sRGB vs Adobe RGB

Community Beginner ,
Feb 26, 2019

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I just had an image rejected for an exposure problem.  I think it's fine considering it was a sunny high contrast day and no shadows are actually blocked.

I was just wondering about the requirement for sRGB images.  All mine are saved as Adobe RGB, and I would have thought Adobe would be the first to accept those.  Could that contribute to my problem?  I'm just starting out (11,000 images to go) and want to start off right.  Thanks

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by ricky336 | Adobe Community Professional

For Adobe, it should be saved as sRGB, which is the standard for computer monitors. The colour space would make little difference in exposure. Adobe also seems to be more picky with what they accept as opposed to other sites like Alamy. I think their quality acceptance is not as high as they claim.

I think this picture is a bit underexposed. There is not so much detail in the shadow areas and because it is a high contrast day, with strong lighting, you have a bit too much contrast, so this has to be brought down a bit. You can bring out the detail in the shadow areas more. They are there.

Have a read about Adobe's quality standards:

Quality and technical issues rejected at Adobe Stock

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sRGB vs Adobe RGB

Community Beginner ,
Feb 26, 2019

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I just had an image rejected for an exposure problem.  I think it's fine considering it was a sunny high contrast day and no shadows are actually blocked.

I was just wondering about the requirement for sRGB images.  All mine are saved as Adobe RGB, and I would have thought Adobe would be the first to accept those.  Could that contribute to my problem?  I'm just starting out (11,000 images to go) and want to start off right.  Thanks

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by ricky336 | Adobe Community Professional

For Adobe, it should be saved as sRGB, which is the standard for computer monitors. The colour space would make little difference in exposure. Adobe also seems to be more picky with what they accept as opposed to other sites like Alamy. I think their quality acceptance is not as high as they claim.

I think this picture is a bit underexposed. There is not so much detail in the shadow areas and because it is a high contrast day, with strong lighting, you have a bit too much contrast, so this has to be brought down a bit. You can bring out the detail in the shadow areas more. They are there.

Have a read about Adobe's quality standards:

Quality and technical issues rejected at Adobe Stock

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Feb 26, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 26, 2019

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For Adobe, it should be saved as sRGB, which is the standard for computer monitors. The colour space would make little difference in exposure. Adobe also seems to be more picky with what they accept as opposed to other sites like Alamy. I think their quality acceptance is not as high as they claim.

I think this picture is a bit underexposed. There is not so much detail in the shadow areas and because it is a high contrast day, with strong lighting, you have a bit too much contrast, so this has to be brought down a bit. You can bring out the detail in the shadow areas more. They are there.

Have a read about Adobe's quality standards:

Quality and technical issues rejected at Adobe Stock

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 26, 2019

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Final transfer should be done with images on sRGB. First Adobe took over stock from Fotolia and second a lot of people (potential buyers) are not prepared to view pictures in anything other than sRGB. AdobeRGB or still better ProphotoRGB are best for the raw processing up to the final jpeg output which should be in sRGB.

And it really makes a difference if a picture in AdobeRGB is viewed as sRGB.

Regards, Abambo
Hard- and Software Engineer and Photographer.

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ReimarG LATEST
Community Beginner ,
Feb 26, 2019

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I hear you.  But out of the dozens of stock sites I've dealt with over the years, all have either required or favored Adobe RGB for the wider gamut.  It is a surprise that Adobe Stock is the first I've seen that asks for sRGB.

And yes, an Adobe RGB image will look awful in an sRGB color space that is not color managed (most are these days).  The contrast of the image will be much lowered.

I did bump the curve up in the middle (the histogram itself looked perfect) and resubmitted.  We'll see.  Thanks for the feedback.

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