TECHNICAL ISSUES every photos, what happen?

New Here ,
May 27, 2021 May 27, 2021

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What is a problem whit this photos?

IMG_1109.jpgIMG_1123.jpg

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correct answers 2 Correct Answers

Adobe Community Professional , May 27, 2021 May 27, 2021
I can't zoom in to confirm, but it appears that the focus is not sharp enough on her eyes. Additionally, there should be catch lights in her eyes. The lighting is very uneven, with harsh blown out bright spots on her face. Composition on the first image is also problematic; it seems the eye is drawn right into the shadowy area between her thighs. A more modest draping of the silk robe would have helped.

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Adobe Community Professional , May 27, 2021 May 27, 2021
Hello, Unfortunately, quite a lot! The lighting is bad in both these shots. It is very uneven, you have strong shadows on the model's face: ... and in contrast, blown-out highlights on the other side. This divides her face in two - dark and light. Is this the effect you wanted?? It's the same with your other photo: The shadow area where the eye is drawn is not a good look either!! You need to work on how you arrange/position your models as well as lighting. This is very important!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 27, 2021 May 27, 2021

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I can't zoom in to confirm, but it appears that the focus is not sharp enough on her eyes. Additionally, there should be catch lights in her eyes. The lighting is very uneven, with harsh blown out bright spots on her face. Composition on the first image is also problematic; it seems the eye is drawn right into the shadowy area between her thighs. A more modest draping of the silk robe would have helped.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 27, 2021 May 27, 2021

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Hello,

Unfortunately, quite a lot!

The lighting is bad in both these shots. It is very uneven, you have strong shadows on the model's face:

InkedIMG_1123_LI.jpg

... and in contrast, blown-out highlights on the other side. This divides her face in two - dark and light. Is this the effect you wanted??

It's the same with your other photo:

InkedIMG_1109_LI.jpg

 

The shadow area where the eye is drawn is not a good look either!!

You need to work on how you arrange/position your models as well as lighting. This is very important!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 28, 2021 May 28, 2021

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First: @Jill_C is correct, the eyes are not sharp. For portraits, they really need to be crisp sharp. You have noise in the shadow areas and as @ricky336 shows and Jill writes, your shows are not helping.

Second: bad cut out, over processed, therefore a painterly look besides the analyses of @ricky336 and @Jill_C.

 

Looking at both of your images, I think you should start training yourself in producing clean cutouts.

Abambo_0-1622200559854.png

 

Clean cutouts on models are, however, very complex, due to the hair. So if you have a model in a studio, get it correct with the right background and the correct lightning. And well, avoid noise. In a studio you can use flashes to get the correct lightning situation and as your model is obviously not jumping, you can choose a slow exposure time.

 

All in all: I recommend you take some training to get your shots right in both, photographing and post-production. Even if it's compelling to photograph half nude women, I recommend starting first with classical portraits and getting those right.

 

If you are new to stock, you should consider these resources: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/tutorials.html
Please read the contributor user manual for more information on Adobe stock contributions: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html
See here for rejection reasons: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/reasons-for-content-rejection.html
and especially quality and technical issues: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/quality-and-technical-issues.html

 

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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