Welcome Dialog

Welcome to the Community!

We have a brand new look! Take a tour with us and explore the latest updates on Adobe Support Community.


Can I Copyright a derivative of an extended licensed image purchased on Adobe Stock?

Community Beginner ,
Feb 11, 2021 Feb 11, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Can I Copyright a derivative of an extended licensed image purchased on Adobe Stock?

 

I buy an extended license. I add my own elements to the original asset, can I then copyright that as a derivative with the copyright office? 

TOPICS
Licensing, Terms of use

Views

76

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 17, 2021 Feb 17, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The extended license does not transfer rights above the level that are transfered and the (c) is never transferred to you. So the simple answer to this is no. Just to be complete: Your part of the artwork is (c) by you and only the original part is still (c) by the original creator. Even Adobe does not claim (c) for the assets, Adobe has been only granted a license to sell (licenses of) the assets under conditions.

 

The complicated answer is: if you create an artwork where the underlying artwork is no more recognizable than the answer is probably yes. But in such a case there are two considerations: Why bothering to license, create from scratch and why bothering to create an extended license.

 

Look here for more information on licensing: https://community.adobe.com/t5/stock/links-for-licensing-terms/td-p/11366788
(Disclaimer: As always with licensing, this is my interpretation of the rules. I think they are correct and advice is based reading and interpreting the license terms and on fair use for both the buyer and the artist/stock company, but I can not rule out that my interpretation is wrong. I'm not an Adobe employee)

 

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Feb 18, 2021 Feb 18, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for the feedback. 

I'd agree on both parts, it is a case where someone came after us for using a hand with a bible verse next to it, we got the hand from Adobe Extended license, and the bible verse, well, it's a bible verse. 

Just curious how it works with copyrights and Adobe stock. I agree however, make my own from scratch. Just wondering how on earth this company can claim such a copyright. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
LEGEND ,
Feb 19, 2021 Feb 19, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

If I take a photo of a bible I get copyright, even if there are a million pics just like it. If the bible was published less than 100 years ago, the publisher and/or editor ALSO have copyright, and I can't claim it exclusively.

You get copyright in ANYTHING you create, even if you make it from completely public elements, even if the composition is trivial or obvious. But you don't get to take away anyone else's copyright. You CANNOT claim copyright on someone else's work, even if the composition is trivial or obvious.

The extended license changes the license, but it cannot change the law of the land...

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Resources
Buy Adobe Stock
Getting Started