Do I own the full copyright of the final image if I used an Adobe Stock image as a part of it?

New Here ,
Jan 01, 2022 Jan 01, 2022

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Hello! I’m a bit confused about the copyright while using an Adobe stock image in a fine art photo composition. If I take and make my own photograph/digital composition and I need one element that I can’t produce myself and I buy it as a stock image (let’s say, an animal that I add there because I don’t have a possibility to go and photograph that animal in the woods/jungle and it is necessary in my concept). The stock photo image is there as a part of an image and I’ve edited and manipulated it so that it will fit in the scene. In some cases, I might even combine two stock photos to create one new element. When the final image is done, do I own the full copyright for my image? I understand I’m allowed to sell the print etc (that’s why I bought extended licence), but if I want to enter the image e.g. in a photo competition and the rules says, that I have to own the full copyright of the image, do I own it? The end image is a photo composition in fine art category and the stock image is only a part of the image. The end image is a whole new piece compared to the stock image that was used.

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LEGEND ,
Jan 02, 2022 Jan 02, 2022

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The copyright of the image remains with the original owner; you do not get copyright to stock images. The composition copyright is yours. You can use the image in the ways granted by the license you buy. For example, you can use it in an advert. But you cannot offer it for sale as a new stock image. Equally, the stock creator gets no right to use your image.

 

In any case where you have to have full copyright, you will not have it.

 

(NB I don't work for Adobe, and this is NOT LEGAL ADVICE)

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New Here ,
Jan 02, 2022 Jan 02, 2022

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Ok, thanks so much for your clarification. This is important information for me, because it would mean than in my future work I would not be able to use in my fine art work an image purchased from an Adobe Stock image, even if it would be a small manipulated image in the composition and even if I buy the highest price of the licence. It would then mean, that all the images that I plan in the future work and all the components that I use have to be done by me to own the full copyright especially if I would like to use it in a competition. I think every artist wants to own the full copyright of their image. I always try to work only with my own images, but sometimes you need something that is out of your reach to make a concept work. So basically, Adobe Stock images is a nice idea for a commercial work but not for artistic work. And no, I would not sell an image made with artistic purpose as a stock footage. Thanks again for your response. If there are anyone working for Adobe that could confirm me this is how it works it would be awesome.

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