Media Production 20 Years Later?

Advocate ,
Nov 30, 2018 Nov 30, 2018

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What were you doing 20 years ago?

Did you watch some of the original episodes of “Law & Order SVU”? They’re hard to avoid. Some days they run on multiple cable channels. Why? “SVU” sometimes gets a million viewers for a rerun. That’s a pretty good audience for cable.

The current season of SVU is the 20th. They are going into the record books for scripted television drama:

https://www.today.com/video/mariska-hargitay-talks-season-20-of-law-order-svu-1329717827986?v=railb&

So, what was (and was not) happening in media technology for 1998 Holiday Season?

Well, we were still shooting on film. The very experimental Nikon D1 was not introduced until June 15, 1999.

We were still involved with “desktop publishing” using Adobe PageMaker or QuarkXPress. Adobe InDesign 1.0 did not ship until August 31, 1999.

Apple gave us the first bite at Mac OS X 1.0 on May 11, 1998, for those of us who were brave explorers. Microsoft shipped Windows 98, 4 days later.

Offset printing press operators thought we were quite amazing that we could do our own proofing with the Epson Stylus Color 3000, which debuted in September 1998.

In North America, HDTV was just starting to gain momentum. The initial live testing started on July 23, 1996, in Raleigh, North Carolina.

We thought Adobe Premiere 5.0 was quite exciting (which was released May 18, 1998). We go back to Premiere 1.0. But, many of the professional video editors we worked with, thought we were playing with toys, to think we could do great work creating video content on a computer tower.

Adobe Illustrator had proven that the Mac version and the Windows version could share a common User Interface. Version 8.0 was released on August 24, 1998.

In today’s environment, Mac and Windows versions sharing operability seems quaint, but designing for the Internet was just ramping up. HTML 4.0 was still evolving and most people were working on a version of HTML 3. Adobe’s PageMill was up to version 3.0 and what would replace it, GoLive, had also released a third version, in 1998. 20 years ago, today, Macromedia Dreamweaver was still in its first version, in its first year. Version 2.0 did hit the streets in December 1998.

Speaking of quaint, creating web images, in Adobe Photoshop, took a little doing, 20 years ago today. Version 5.5 was the one which brought valuable tools to Internet page creation. That happened February 17, 1999.

How about feeling thankful for where media technology has come in the past 20 years?

Many great technological issues have moved the industry forward in that time. But the industry gains have gone deeper.

What are you thankful for?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 02, 2018 Dec 02, 2018

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I think our boss got us a D1. It was horrible and we never really used it, as film was so much better. We did start using computers for our photo processing, starting with PS 5.5. I was thrilled not to have to spend all that time in the darkroom, standing, printing the images. We bought a Scanview drum scanner to scan our negs - 2100 ppi. Never had to use that high of a resolution. We used to make 8X10 overhead transparencies for meetings and Velox halftone prints for hard copies, using a process camera, that started to disappear with Powerpoint presentations. We had artist paint renderings of our satellites for display, then we would copy them and make prints. That stopped too, and I was given 3D CAD renderings of the satellites that I would then enhance in PS to make them look for realistic. We would go to the Cape to photograph the preparation for satellite launches. Back then we shot film, so the file had to be couriered back to our lab on the west coast, so days delay getting the film. If we were in a rush, we would take over a local lab and do our processing there. Finally the folks at the Cape set up a trailer with a processing lab where we could process and print our photos, so that we could get prelaunch images to the astronauts and ground control. Everything is so much easier now!

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Community Beginner ,
Dec 12, 2018 Dec 12, 2018

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The simple use of adobe technology has expanded

media production. which many question the bugs

of the adobe programs.

But they tend to improve performance

and use, leaving improvement better and better.

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Advocate ,
Dec 25, 2018 Dec 25, 2018

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superc51632781  wrote

The simple use of adobe technology has expanded media production.

Adobe apps have opened doors for many who could not become involved in traditional media.

This allows people to ramp up, at their own pace.

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Advocate ,
Dec 25, 2018 Dec 25, 2018

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It's a Safari 12.0.1 thing.

https://forums.adobe.com/people/Chuck+Uebele  wrote

I was thrilled not to have to spend all that time in the darkroom, standing, printing the images.

In a big production environment, the darkroom was a great place to get away from all the workplace conflict. I could go in there and get some serious work done.

All bets were off when someone needed 100 prints which required extensive burning and dodging.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 27, 2018 Dec 27, 2018

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maxresdefault.jpg

images.jpeg

The best thing since sliced bread

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Advocate ,
Dec 27, 2018 Dec 27, 2018

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Thank you, Mo. That's the kind of evolution which came to the minds of Janet & I.

Some of the truly awesome work, which amazes us, is the curation of media libraries from SD to HD and even traditional film reels to 4K. That brings generations of great work to new generations.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 31, 2018 Dec 31, 2018

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I doubt any non Brits of a certain age will remember the TV series Triangle.  It was billed as the first such series to be shot entirely on Video.  It ran from 1981 to 83 according to IMDB.

This is the first comment on IMDB, and it makes interesting reading.

In genre, this series of 'Triangle' was probably more of a 'soap' than a serious drama. The programmes, being broadcast several times a week, would tend to confirm this view. The series was a brave experiment in the use of video. It was probably the first British drama to be entirely shot on the medium. A large percentage of the 'filming' was also done on location, including North Sea ferries. The technical costs were very high. The process of filming on ferries was also plagued by weather considerations, and power supply difficulties. The costs of transporting a technical crew, and performers, must have been huge. It is worth noting that, regardless of any problems in the production process, the screening also suffered from frequent breakdowns. Transmitted from a video source, picture-freezes, playback speed variations, picture break-up and so on, were very common. The acting could best be described as adequate, but was nearly always overshadowed by technical aberrations. The scripts were often very good, when considered alongside other 'soaps', and actually had some substance. Much of the filming was on location in Europe, and was visually very appealing, and competent. Had this series been made a few years later, it might still be with us now. 'Triangle' was a good idea, let down by the vagaries of an emergent technology. 'Triangle' was probably finally 'sunk' by the financial costs involved in production, and the difficulties in transmitting video. Whatever the problems, the series was highly entertaining to watch - other people's misfortunes have always provided the biggest laughs!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 01, 2019 Jan 01, 2019

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The pioneers of video were truly amazing and went through hell to get the shots they needed. The new generation are truly lucky to have been given the technology of today but this has unfortunately led to laziness and complacency. Phones are making this worse. Everyone has suddenly become a DP or director. Yet the benefits are also evident with drones being able to carry phones and GoPros to places inaccessible  in the past. Technology used the right way and out in the right hands can be an amazing thing.

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Advocate ,
Jan 01, 2019 Jan 01, 2019

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https://forums.adobe.com/people/Mo+Moolla  wrote

Phones are making this worse. Everyone has suddenly become a DP or director.

Janet & I are somewhat divided on this

1. We have seen people attempting to record some important events in their family's life on a phone. Something inside us says, "You're making me sad for you!" With years of lay ministry in our history, we have seen some of the same family members getting some serious gear a year or two later.

2. We do meet young people who get a spark lit in them with cheap excuses for a camera, that their parents have. Our hope is that the tiny spark starts a career bonfire.

My mom was a graphic artist. Janet's dad was an ad agency exec. We grew up with some pretty nice still and motion picture tools and libraries of learning.

We have met people who have learned from our books and seminars, so we know we have set a few sparks. But, we still want to light some major bonfires.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 01, 2019 Jan 01, 2019

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Brian the problem with phones from what I seen is this as an example:

At a concert people hold up their phones instead of enjoying the experience. They then bring back this footage and Tweet small clips out. Some even go out and cut thee clips into a mini concert

At the  other end of the spectrum people flood the net with clips they call creative which are far from it. Theres just so much info out there its incredible and only a few truly stand out.

The tech is great but it needs direction. The advent of the DSLR started this trend and I call this the "Lens Flare Era". So people shoot and record but don't know how to put this into a truly thought provoking and emotional journey onscreen. I see the trend slowly changing and watch multiple channels for that glint of a sparkle I know will fuel a new breed of young videographers and DP's.

Mo

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Advocate ,
Jan 01, 2019 Jan 01, 2019

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https://forums.adobe.com/people/Mo+Moolla  wrote

At a concert people hold up their phones instead of enjoying the experience.

You get no argument from me on that one, Mo. The US Dept of Commerce has some fascinating data on the growth of the Service Sector Economy, in North America. They break down the Service Sector and focus on areas such as Media+Entertainment & Hospitality. Many of us can compartmentalize those 3 areas. But, to many consumers, it all blurs into a big leisure-time event.

And, yes, the on stage experience is best if you drink in all of what is happening from the full 360 degrees around you. Yet, some people feel the most important thing to do is record it themselves. We see this at sporting events, too. However, if that's the value they receive from their ticket purchase, so be it.

Do they all become Directors of Photography or Journalists? Probably not. Once they capture fuzzy photos and over exposed footage do they learn that they at least need a high end dSLR and many months of education? I don't think so.

Some classify that behavior as "Lifestyle." There's a desire to communicate what they're eating, where they are staying, and the A&E (arts and entertainment) experiences they are having.

I'm not going to impose my professional image making advise upon them, because they didn't ask for it. I am also not going to suggest they find other ways to value a play, concert, exhibit, or movie. For me, the best images you make at such events are of the people you enjoy them with. But, again, that's my opinion.

Janet & I got into M+E & H through other means, going back to childhood. We went the route of formal education and have never stopped learning.

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Advocate ,
Jan 01, 2019 Jan 01, 2019

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https://forums.adobe.com/people/Brian+Stoppee  wrote

Janet & I got into M+E & H through other means, going back to childhood. We went the route of formal education and have never stopped learning.

That said, we learn from what has happened in the industry over the past 20 years (and yes, 40 some years) and we just keep studying it.

We're read some interesting explorations on "Institutional Awareness." It speaks of people in their 50s, 60s, and beyond, who have lived the evolution of industries and how those industries will lessen when that experience exits the workforce. So, finding out how to hang onto those levels of expertise is essential.

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Advocate ,
Jan 01, 2019 Jan 01, 2019

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https://forums.adobe.com/people/Brian+Stoppee  wrote

We're read some interesting explorations on "Institutional Awareness." It speaks of people in their 50s, 60s, and beyond, who have lived the evolution of industries and how those industries will lessen when that experience exits the workforce. So, finding out how to hang onto those levels of expertise is essential.

Funny related story on how not to it:

For a few minutes a day, a few days a week, Janet & I work with a guy in his mid-20s. He has a degree in IT Management.

Where he works, they play mostly Classic Rock or Classic Jazz or Early Show Tunes. He calls it "old man music." I got a chuckle over how he thought the music from the 1930s and 1940s were from my childhood. I was silly enough to explain to him that this music is part of North America's cultural heritage. Learning about that music would also teach him about the history of the continent where he lives. I just got an eye roll response.

But, he also told me Adobe is just Photoshop and what's the big deal about that, today. (You didn't know Photoshop is so-over, did you?)

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