A font foundry wants to charge me for using a logo created with Adobe Font

New Here ,
Apr 16, 2020 Apr 16, 2020

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I have a design agency. I created a logo with Cora (Adobe Font from typetogether foundry) for a client for a new brand creation.

My client likes the logo & wonder about using the whole font for further materials (website, visuals, products packaging).

I contacted the foundry. They gave me the price for commercial use of the font that the client may purchase (10 times the price of the desktop licence, per type, per year - fyi). I understand & I think the client would be ready to pay for this. 

But they also told me I need to purchase the right to use commercially the logo I created. That I can only use the logo to show in a presentation, but not on products the brand will sell.

Is that so? It seems to contradict everything I read on Adobe font licensing page (https://helpx.adobe.com/fonts/using/font-licensing.html#act-lic) as well as on other Adobe answered post. I read adobe EULA and it doesn't seem to contradict my understanding, but it is a fairly complex law text I must say.  I also wonder, what is the use of using Adobe font if I need to pay to use a logo? 

An official answer would be much appreciated. 

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Apr 17, 2020 Apr 17, 2020

Unfortunately, this is not so simple.

 

If you create a logo using the font from Adobe Fonts and ship the logo to your customer in any finished form such as PDF, EPS, or even a raster format, your client can use that logo artwork without any additional royalties whatsoever to the original font foundry on any product that they sell as well as for any internal use. The same is true if you, a licensee of Adobe Fonts (via your CC subscription), directly design products using that font delivering jus

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 17, 2020 Apr 17, 2020

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If the client wants to use the font in their branding, products and promotional materials, they'll need a license to use the font.  Does your client have a Creative Cloud plan?  If yes, they can use Adobe Fonts and are covered by the Adobe font licensing agreement.

https://helpx.adobe.com/fonts/using/font-licensing.html

 

If not, they'll need to pay for a license directly from the font foundry.

 

Hope that helps,

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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Apr 17, 2020 Apr 17, 2020

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Unfortunately, this is not so simple.

 

If you create a logo using the font from Adobe Fonts and ship the logo to your customer in any finished form such as PDF, EPS, or even a raster format, your client can use that logo artwork without any additional royalties whatsoever to the original font foundry on any product that they sell as well as for any internal use. The same is true if you, a licensee of Adobe Fonts (via your CC subscription), directly design products using that font delivering just the artwork to the client.

 

The only issue comes up if your client wants to license the font outside of a license to Adobe Fonts (i.e., they either aren't licensed for Creative Cloud or choose not to access the font via Adobe Fonts). Then you get into the scenario that you have painted which could be very expensive. 

 

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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