Adobe Fonts for commercial logos, print, and more

Explorer ,
Mar 30, 2013 Mar 30, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Between Apple and Adobe they compose 99.9% of my software and also 99% of my income.

As a freelancer starting out I would like some simple clarification from an administrator, Adobe representative, or anyone who has talked with them regarding font usage rights.

I don't undestand why anyone would ever purchase fonts for personal use, but that is NOT what I am doing. I use them to create logos and print documents for CLIENTS. These documents are not created for 'fun.' Although sometimes they end up being fun

Can I use fonts provided by Adobe either purchased or that come with their software to:

1) Create a logo, brocheure, or business card for a client that will be used commercially?

2) Alter the type (kerning, serifs) for designing a logo, brocheure, or business card for a client that will be used

    commercially?

3) Do I have to read each EULA for the fonts Adobe provided with it's software or is the EULA for all fonts

    installed on the software applicable?

4) I know NOT to send electronic files to my clients and to embed the font so they can not access the font on

   their computer. Is 'embedding' the font ok for my projects?

I am so confused. I don't understand why there can not be a straightforward response for these large corporations. I understand purchasing individual fonts from foundries through databases and reading each EULA is imperative, but not for these large corporations.

Sorry, just went through this with Apple, and so many individuals give variable responses.

Views

6.0K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Apr 03, 2013 Apr 03, 2013

Let me try again! 

There is only one EULA from Adobe for fonts and it applies to all fonts licensed from Adobe, whether the font was designed by Adobe or acquired by Adobe from another foundry. You only need to read ONE EULA from Adobe.

All fonts licensed from Adobe permit at least preview and print embedding (and incurr no further royalties for distribution of PDF and EPS in which such fonts are embedded), meaning that you may use such fonts for logo design, print, etc.

Since there is only one EU

...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Explorer ,
Mar 30, 2013 Mar 30, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Also, the reason I am responding is because after reading this thread:

http://forums.adobe.com/message/4941929

it only brought on more confusion. It sounds like we can't use them for anything a graphic designer would use them for!!

Again, sorry just frustrated with the process and recieving no clear cut answers.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mar 30, 2013 Mar 30, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I think the thread at <http://forums.adobe.com/message/4941929> is fairly clear about you rights in terms of usage of fonts licensed from Adobe, including fonts bundled with Adobe applications.

You may use the fonts provided with any Adobe software in your content such as logos (even if they are created with non-Adobe software while you are licensed for the Adobe software) and you may distribute such artwork to others with the fonts as long as that is distributed in the form of either PDF files or EPS files with the fonts embedded. (Adobe most strongly recommends PDF over EPS for modern, reliable workflows!) You also may modify the fonts, either the metrics and/or the glyph designs themselves, for your use of these fonts and even embed those modified fonts in the resultant PDF or EPS. You may also outline or rasterize your design using such fonts if that is necessary for your output format (such as if you are restricted to raster formats such as PNG, TIFF, or JPEG or to vector formats such as WMF or EMF).

As noted in the original thread, these terms may not necessarily apply (and probably don't apply) to fonts licensed from other foundries.

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Apr 02, 2013 Apr 02, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi Dov,

Sorry if you felt as though it was clear, because I however did not. So again my apologies for wasting your time, but it's greatly appreciated.

You stated:

"On behalf of Adobe Systems Incorporated ...This (that “you can copy and send the fonts for a reproduction house for the sole purpose of reproducing that particular piece or job”) is absolutelynot true! In fact it is not true for any of Adobe's fonts!"

I took the copy as copying the font not the font file itself. The purpose of embedding is to control any users recieving the font without paying for them correct? Copying the image is not giving anyone the file. That's where my confusion came from I think.

You also stated:

"What is true is that your ability to send, share, or even embed fonts is dependent upon the EULA (End User License Agreement) for each and every font you use in your content. And, by the way, any restrictions in the EULA legally override any embedding permissions that might be set in the font itself for TrueType and OpenType fonts!"

From this I gathered that if I purchased the adobe pack I would still have to read " for each and every font you use in your content" the EULA for every font I purchased through Adobe or installed with the software. That's what this comment is stating. True or False?

And when I read this, And, by the way, any restrictions in the EULA legally override any embedding permissions that might be set in the font itself for TrueType and OpenType fonts! I become confused. Are you referring to the type foundry EULA over rides Adobe or vice versa?

Sorry Dov, guess I want to use Adobe correctly, which should be viewed as a positive not stupidity asking for clarification!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Apr 02, 2013 Apr 02, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

For your first question, in terms of Adobe's font library, there is only one EULA – thus false. If you licensed 120 fonts from Adobe, there is only one EULA governing all 120 fonts. I cannot comment on the EULAs for other font foundries. They may or may not have all their fonts covered by a single EULA. You will need to ascertain this for every other foundry whose fonts you license – thus maybe.

For your second question, when I refer to any embedding permissions that might be set in the font itself for TrueType and OpenType fonts, I am referring to codes within the font file itself that serve as indicators to Acrobat, InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, etc. that a font may or may not  be embedded and for what purposes. These codes within a font might not restrict embedding, but the EULA itself may. In the case of such contradictions, the EULA governs. To your particular question, though, there is never a conflict between the EULA of Adobe for fonts licensed from Adobe and the EULAs for fonts licensed from other foundries. The only EULA that applies is that of the font foundry from which you licensed a particular font.

Thanks for asking your questions. They are not at all stupid. This whole area is really as clear as mud! 

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Apr 03, 2013 Apr 03, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Clear as Mud Dov

I believe my confusion has been identified. Adobe does not sell just Adobe fonts, it sells from other foundries meaning there are multiple licenses.

Just to clarify:

  • I have to read each and every EULA when purchasing any font from the Adobe website? That could mean no commercial rights for logo design, print, ect?
  • The EULA needs to be reviewed before any usage including embedding?
  • So purchasing the large font bundle from Adobe like FontFolio would be futile for a freelance graphic designer, because I could not utilze the typography for my clients. I could purchase the bundle and then learn the EULA don't allow the fonts for what I need?

Sorry Dov, your statement below contridicated itself OR I am just slightly ignorant

For your first question, in terms of Adobe's font library, there is only one EULA – thus false. If you licensed 120 fonts from Adobe, there is only one EULA governing all 120 fonts.

I love Adobe products and just want to ensure I am utlizing them correctly! Thanks again, your time is appreciated!


Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Apr 03, 2013 Apr 03, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Let me try again! 

There is only one EULA from Adobe for fonts and it applies to all fonts licensed from Adobe, whether the font was designed by Adobe or acquired by Adobe from another foundry. You only need to read ONE EULA from Adobe.

All fonts licensed from Adobe permit at least preview and print embedding (and incurr no further royalties for distribution of PDF and EPS in which such fonts are embedded), meaning that you may use such fonts for logo design, print, etc.

Since there is only one EULA for all fonts licensed from Adobe, the Font Folio product is very simple to use from a legal point of view. All fonts from Adobe permit your use for logo design, print, etc. (Otherwise, wouldn't they be effectively useless?)

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Apr 07, 2013 Apr 07, 2013

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks Dov!

This response was extremely helpful! I appreciate your time and assistance!

It's nice to know there is one resource out there in which I can just purchase a font without worrying about reading each and every EULA.

Again, thanks for your help it's greatly appreciated!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Mar 23, 2018 Mar 23, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Does that means that we can use the fonts on designs that will be printed in products to sell like shirts mugs etc.? and what about the emojis? are those consider fonts? Can I use apple emojis to make designs that will be printed on products to sell? What about Emoji One emojis?  Do I need a license from emoji one or from Adobe to use the emojis to be printed on products to sell like t shirt and mugs? Thanks in Advance

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mar 23, 2018 Mar 23, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

Our responses on this forum are strictly for fonts licensed from Adobe. For such fonts, per my previous responses in this thread from nearly five years ago, yes, you can use Adobe-licensed fonts in the design of products such as shirts, mugs, etc. You cannot bundle any such fonts themselves as part of a product (such as a computer game, mobile application, etc.).

We cannot comment on Apple emojis or emojis in any non-Adobe font. You would need to consult the appropriate font vendor/foundry for their specific license terms. Any emojis in fonts licensed from Adobe are the same as any other characters in those fonts with the same usage and embedding privileges.

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines