Confused about re-buying an old font: nowhere to be found

Explorer ,
Sep 06, 2018 Sep 06, 2018

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I opened up some old InDesign files and got a message "New Century Schoolbook LT Std Pro" can't be found. In the interest of speed (because my very cheap LG-brand CD can't read some discs) I swapped out Std Pro with non-Pro, but then I figured it can't cost that much so I'd just rebuy it for later.

This face, pro or non-pro, has been around and part of the Adobe library since the days of yesteryear, but I went to Typekit and not even the two words "New Century" could be found. Not even in good-old Type 1. I have not bought a new face in a very long time, and I can't afford the Folio 11 for $3K, so what happened? I recall Adobe jettisoned the Berthold family years ago, but has there been another sea change I slept through? Was NC Schoolbook a part of Berthold?

In a similar vein, take Myriad for example. Time was where you could buy the entire family; now, you can buy some individual and some are free, but there is no option I can see where "look, I just want the whole family."

So basically, what happed to the ability to just buy a family? And where have (at least one, Schoolbook) of the old face(s) gone?

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Sep 06, 2018 Sep 06, 2018

The interesting thing is that Adobe never licensed any font by the name New Century Schoolbook LT Std Pro!

And the name is contradictory. The Std stands for “standard” while Pro stands for “professional.” Adobe did license either individually or part of the Adobe Font Folio the New Century Schoolbook LT Std font OpenType font family. Adobe never licensed any font family named New Century Schoolbook LT Pro. Why you are getting a message prompting for New Century Schoolbook LT Std Pro simply doesn'

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Sep 06, 2018 Sep 06, 2018

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The interesting thing is that Adobe never licensed any font by the name New Century Schoolbook LT Std Pro!

And the name is contradictory. The Std stands for “standard” while Pro stands for “professional.” Adobe did license either individually or part of the Adobe Font Folio the New Century Schoolbook LT Std font OpenType font family. Adobe never licensed any font family named New Century Schoolbook LT Pro. Why you are getting a message prompting for New Century Schoolbook LT Std Pro simply doesn't make any sense to us. Assuming you have the New Century Schoolbook LT Std font, you should be fine.

You still can license (you don't buy fonts but rather you buy licenses for fonts) the full Myriad Pro family via our partner Fontspring at https://www.fontspring.com/foundry/adobe

Fonts that Adobe previously licensed from other foundries such as the New Century Schoolbook family were licensed from Linotype are still available via the Adobe Font Folio product or directly from Linotype https://www.linotype.com/ . In this case, look at https://www.linotype.com/5609139/new-century-schoolbook-family.html

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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Explorer ,
Sep 06, 2018 Sep 06, 2018

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That helps a lot, thanks. And did Adobe cut ties with Linotype, so that we can't by type licensed from them? By the way, did you see the Linotype movie about the machine? One of my favorites.

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Sep 07, 2018 Sep 07, 2018

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Actually, Linotype, Monotype, ITC, Bitsteam, etc. are all part of one big new Monotype, the company that runs fonts.com as well as legacy linotype.com and monotype.com websites.

The relationship has evolved over the years. Adobe is much less involved with direct licensing of fonts other than the remaining Adobe Font Folio product and fonts that may be licensed via Typekit. Part of this is driven by the fact that font licensing is much different for use on websites than for printing or embedding in PDF files.

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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