Conversion tool to convert Postscript to Open Type Fonts

New Here ,
Mar 28, 2006 Mar 28, 2006

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We are in a situation where we must start using Open Type Fonts. We started by using the 'Find font' feature of InDesign to basically replace the Postscript font with the Open type equivalent. We have one that does not come as Open Type; Formata.

This raises two questions -
1 - If we were to convert the Postscript version to Open Type using Conversion Software, would we be breaking Font Laws by doing something illegal? I ask because we would not be the only ones having to use this font. This is a fairly common font used by our customer.

2 - If we were to convert this font to Open Type, what problems could we possibly experience later down the road with Rips when trying to print the job?
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Open Type FDK

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Community Beginner ,
Mar 28, 2006 Mar 28, 2006

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> 1 - If we were to convert the Postscript version
> to Open Type using Conversion Software, would we
> be breaking Font Laws by doing something illegal?

That depends on the exact terms of the End User License Agreement (EULA) that is between you and the font vendor. Some vendors allow user modifications of the fonts, others don't. What you surely are not allowed to do is distribute the converted fonts.

> 2 - If we were to convert this font to Open Type,
> what problems could we possibly experience later
> down the road with Rips when trying to print the
> job?

This depends on whether you convert the font into OpenType TT (.ttf) or OpenType PS (.otf). I wouldn't recommend converting Type 1 fonts into OpenType TT fonts since the outline point coordinates are converted into a different curve system which may result in minimal inaccuraties.

You can convert Type 1 fonts into OpenType PS fonts using Adobe FDK for OpenType or using TransType Pro by Fontlab Ltd. (http://www.fontlab.com/transtype/ ).

When OpenType PS fonts are sent to a PostScript printer or RIP, the printer driver usually converts them to PostScript Type 1 fonts. So in the PostScript RIP, both OpenType PS fonts and Type 1 fonts arrive as Type 1 fonts.

When OpenType TT fonts are sent to a PostScript printer or RIP, the printer driver sends them in the TrueType native format (Type 42) or converts them into Type 1 fonts, depending on the user's settings. But generally,

Adobe documents common problems with OpenType fonts (mostly with OpenType PS fonts) at:
http://store.adobe.com/type/browser/OTReadMe.html

Regards,
Adam Twardoch
Fontlab Ltd.

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New Here ,
Mar 29, 2006 Mar 29, 2006

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Cari,

Out of curiosity, and because it might help with providing advice to you, what sort of situation are you in that requires use of OpenType format fonts? More specifically, what sort of situation requires existing Type 1 fonts to be converted to OpenType rather than just used in their original Type 1 format?

L.

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New Here ,
Mar 30, 2006 Mar 30, 2006

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I don't think I am permitted to say too much due to confidentiality at my workplace. [It's a new system my company is creating that permits a user to login, enter data, submit the form and request 'X' amount of copies of the piece be printed.]

Adam - I wanted to ask a few questions to you directly. We have a copy of TransType Pro so I gave it a try. Problems came up so I logged onto FontLab's site and saw your name there as well.

Would it be possible to ask a few questions regarding TransType Pro to you? For example, I followed the instructed (or so I think) but when I load the fonts (on a PC using Suitcase), something very strange is happening to the styles. I load 'FORMATAC' for Formata Condensed and in InDesign, I get two styles I didn't load - Condensed Italic and Medium Condensed (Condensed doesn't show up at all). Am I doing something wrong?

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Explorer ,
Mar 28, 2021 Mar 28, 2021

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15 years have passed since my last reply in this thread 🙂 Now, Adobe announced end of support for PostScript Type 1 fonts. I work for FontLab, we make the eponymous FontLab pro font editor. We have also created TransType 4, an easy-to-use converted that you can use to convert your obsolete (yet still valuable) Type 1 fonts into modern OpenType fonts, and a few days ago I made a video that shows you how to do it: https://youtu.be/j06_QuBwy7Y 

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