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Different font thickness between InDesign and Word

Explorer ,
Aug 22, 2017 Aug 22, 2017

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I'm currently work on text, which intented to be read on screen. For that reason, body text should be quite large, 15-16 points.

I use both InDesign CS6 and Word 2016 for this project.

As I discovered, at some specific sizes, Adobe fonts looks different in InDesign and Word. I don't understand why. (Any help is welcome).

I tested with Minion Pro, Arno Pro, Garamond Premiere Pro and Times New Roman (the last is TTF, shipped with Windows).

Picture 1: InDesign CS6. Top - Minion Pro, bottom - Times New Roman. There are no problems here, both fonts looks good in all sizes.

indesign.PNG

Picture 2: Word 2016 (or recent LibreOffice Writer, no difference). Top - Minion Pro, bottom - Times New Roman. As you can see, at 16 points Minion dramatically increases it's thickness.

word_.png

Why I have such unpleasant look in Word and LibreOffice? How I could fix it?

Word and Writer works identically, i.e. at 16 points Minion change it look it both programs. That's why, form my point of view, both programs works as they should (correctly), and the problem is somewhere in Adobe fonts (Minion, Arno, Garamond Premiere). And that's why I ask about described problem at Adobe forums, instead of somewhere at Microsoft one's.

... Well, as I discovered during writing this post, the described problem is applicable to almost any serif OTF fonts. But I still think there are a lot of qualified professional typographers, who can explain why it occurs and how it could be fixed.

Summary: TTF fonts - looks good at all sizes. OTF fonts - increases it's thickness at 16 points and above.

Cheers, John.

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