Kozuka Gothic Pro apostrophe question

New Here ,
Jun 05, 2008 Jun 05, 2008

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I have used Kozuka Gothic Pro in InDesign CS3, Word(2007), and Photoshop CS3. When the apostrophe appears in all but Photoshop there is an unsightly white gap after the apostrophe. It works fine in Photoshop. Any ideas why this happens? I am using all of these programs on a Thinkpad running Vista.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 05, 2008 Jun 05, 2008

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Perhaps you're getting the fullwidth apostrophe; Kozuka is, after all, a Japanese font. Enter an apostrophe in Word, select it, and then go to Insert -> Symbol. It should give the Unicode name at the bottom of that window; if it's "FULL WIDTH APOSTROPHE," I'd start asking you about the language settings on your laptop.

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Explorer ,
Jun 05, 2008 Jun 05, 2008

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For those of us completely unfamiliar with Japanese fonts and typesetting, what's the usage of a full-width apostrophe?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 05, 2008 Jun 05, 2008

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I've been hunting for an example online for a while, but I'm coming up empty.

Consider a monospaced font like Courier, in which each glyph is the same width as all the others. One standard method of including European words in Chinese text (which I have primarily seen in newspapers) is to treat a string of Latin glyphs as if they were Chinese; each character is as wide as a standard Chinese glyph, words are allowed to break at any point without hyphenation, no spaces are used, et cetera. On top of that, any font with Japanese support should have a significant degree of Chinese support. So, in most CJK fonts, you'll find a set of fullwidth Latin script characters and punctuation. You may also probably see a halfwidth monospaced set as well. These fullwidth Latin characters wouldn't be used in contemporary Japanese, so far as I know, but as a result of Unihan (unification of Chinese, Japanese kanji, and Korean hanja) there is a lot of crossover in the glyph complements of these fonts.

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Explorer ,
Jun 05, 2008 Jun 05, 2008

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Thanks, Joel.

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