Simple OTF fonts with maximum set of Unicode ranges

New Here ,
Jul 17, 2009 Jul 17, 2009

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I'm shopping around for fonts for use in a global corporate organization that creates printed packaging in numerous languages.  What I need is as small a set of fonts as possible that would include at least the following Unicode ranges (and be all Unicode-friendly, obviously):

Latin (and supplements/extensions), Cyrillic (and extensions), Greek (and exts), CJK Unified Ideograph, Hiragana, Katakana, Hangul Jamo (Hangul Choseong & Hangul Jungseong), Tha, Hebrew and Arabic.  Devanagari would be nice, but isn't needed immediately.

An Opentype version of Arial Unicode MS would solve this issue totally for the sans-serif side of things (we can't use Arial Unicode MS itself for,... stupid reasons), but we also need a serif'd font, anyway.

I've tried digging around on the Adobe fonts site looking for precise, hard, quantitative information like this, but have come up empty handed.  Help?

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New Here ,
Jul 17, 2009 Jul 17, 2009

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PS:  That "Tha" above should be "Thai."

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Jul 18, 2009 Jul 18, 2009

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For better or worse, you won't find such information on Adobe's website since we don't offer any single font family that covers that full range or even a reasonable subset of it.

Another consideration is that the concept of a serifed font is not universal to typography in all languages. Hebrew and Arabic, for example don't have fonts with serifs. Although Monotype's Times New Roman (ships with Windows) supports both the Hebrew and Arabic characters, those characters within the Times New Roman font are hardly serifed characters. They may look good with the truly-serifed Latin and Cyrillic characters in the font, but they themselves are not serifed.

What you will need to do is find a selection of fonts covering the code pages you require which complement each other. I know I'd be very interested in your reporting back what your conclusions are and especially if you can find any on-line discussion of this issue with specific recommendations.

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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New Here ,
Dec 04, 2009 Dec 04, 2009

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Where do you buy fonts?I thought they just came coded in. I didn't know you could buy them. Can you tell me where. Thanks.

David

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