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Type 1 licensing did it cover 'print on demand'?

New Here ,
Oct 24, 2013 Oct 24, 2013

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So here's the issue, in common with many other publishers we maintain a 'reprints' dept. Traditionally publishers made minor changes to 'standing pages' such that the pages did not require re make up, for some publishers usually producing works of reference this is where the real profit is made.

Replacing a T1 font with an OT or TT version is not always possible as there are often 'minor' changes to the font metrics that cause reflow.

The standing pages are held in 'old' versions of applications - both InDesign and Quark have at some stage revised the H&J engines.

Both InDesign and Quark have also at times made changes to graphic (object) handling which can cause line and page reflow.

So I have to maintain 'old' versions of both the applications and operating systems.

Now a possible solution to the reprints issue has been suggested, apply the minor corrections and updates, create PDF's of the sections/pages/titles then make them available to subscribers as print-on-demand addendums.

As I recall Adobe T1 fonts were licensed for print and view and primarily for output/print by a repro house or printer, but I need to know whether the standard license covered 'print on demand'? The online licensing info covers the current font technology.

The PDF's would use a subset of fonts and would be locked.

The PDF's would not be publicly available, they would only be available to the clients who committed to buying a work of reference over an extended period - who have now become subscribers.

Cheers

Phil

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Oct 24, 2013 Oct 24, 2013

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How do you differentiate “Preview and Print“ from “Print on Demand?”

All Adobe-licensed fonts permit embedding in PDF, EPS, and PostScript for at least “Preview and Print.” There are no restrictions whatsoever in the Adobe licenses in terms of what you do with or how you distribute these PDF files. (This is not necessarily true for other font vendors!)

Thus, there should be no problem here!

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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New Here ,
Oct 24, 2013 Oct 24, 2013

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Thanks for your quick response.

At a previous publisher we were taken to task for hosting PDF's and allowing the clients to print as required, and informed that the font license (not Adobe) allowed a locked PDF to be used for preview/soft proofing and commercial print only.

We have a large catalogue of works of reference, that use mostly Adobe T1 fonts and we wanted to be sure there would be no issues with the business model.

It sometimes surprises people that despite the growth of e publications, many customers buy both 'electronic' and print versions of works of reference (such as law) - the e versions are great for search, case history and comparison, they then prefer to read the print version.

Cheers

Phil

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As indicated, you are totally safe with fonts sourced from Adobe. For fonts sourced elsewhere, you really must carefully read the EULA (End User License Agreement) for each font. Some allow embedding, but don't allow distribution of the resultant PDF files without paying an additional royalty.

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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