Using OT fonts in Encapsulated Postscript

New Here ,
May 02, 2003 May 02, 2003

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Hello, I'm writing an Ecapsulated Postscript file which inculdes text.

I've found that any font name that includes spaces fail. For instance, the following PS command works fine:

/Ariel findfont setfont

While this does not:

/Bookman Old Style findfont setfont

I've also tried using a string for the name like so:

/Strfnt (Bookman Old Style) def
/Strfnt findfont setfont

Alas, this fails as well. Can anyone tell me howto use a font name which includes spaces within an EPS file?

Thanks for any help,

landon
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Open Type FDK

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Enthusiast ,
May 04, 2003 May 04, 2003

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You can't. However, you don't need to, either.

What EPS expects to see is the PostScript FontName. This does not have spaces, and usually uses a dash to separate the family name from the style name. For example, "Helvetica-Roman" or "BookmanOldStyle-Regular" (I don't know that's actually the right name, just a guess).

Regards,

T

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New Here ,
May 06, 2003 May 06, 2003

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Thanks! So you're saying that every OpenType font has a corresponding Postscript name?

Am I understanding you correctly?

How can I determine what the Postscript name is? Is it buried in the font file somewhere?

landon

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Enthusiast ,
May 06, 2003 May 06, 2003

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If you're on Windows, or if you're using ATM Deluxe, you can get a font sample sheet that shows the PostScript FontName. Just double click on the font.

Most other font management applications should have some option for showing you the PostScript FontName.

For any OpenType font from Adobe, the file name is in fact the PostScript FontName with ".otf" tacked on the end.

Regards,

T

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New Here ,
Jul 01, 2003 Jul 01, 2003

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You can also use OTFProof to dump the name table of any OTF font and find the PostScript name entry.

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