• Global community
    • Language:
      • Deutsch
      • English
      • Español
      • Français
      • Português
  • 日本語コミュニティ
    Dedicated community for Japanese speakers
  • 한국 커뮤니티
    Dedicated community for Korean speakers
Exit
0

Best processor for Premiere Pro - Intel 7th or 8th generation?

New Here ,
Aug 13, 2018 Aug 13, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hello,

I want to buy a new laptop. I'll mainly use it for Premiere Pro, After Effects and Photoshop. Should I rather buy a 7th or an 8th generation Intel processor?

The 8th generation has more cores, but a lower clock speed. Will Adobe programmes profit from the extra cores? Or should I better choose for the higher clock speed?

Cores
Max Turbo FequencyBase Frequency
Cache
i7-7700HQ (7th gen.)43.8 GHz2.8 GHz6 mb
i7-8750H (8th gen.)64.1 GHz2.1 GHz9 MB SmartCache

Thanks in advance!

Views

7.1K

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Aug 13, 2018 Aug 13, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Moved to Hardware forum.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Aug 13, 2018 Aug 13, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks!

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
LEGEND ,
Aug 13, 2018 Aug 13, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Well, you will see little difference in Photoshop because the heavy processing work is only performed relatively briefly. But in Premiere and After Effects, since a large amount of time is done rendering, the  go with the i7-8750H: Despite having more cores, it's the all-core and maximum Turbo speeds that matter here. You will seldom, if ever, see the base clock speed out of either of those CPUs unless you spend most of the PC's time solely on battery power (which you shouldn't be when running such CPU-intensive apps to begin with); instead, you will more likely see closer to the maximum Turbo speeds there. In case of the all-core Turbo speed, that of the i7-8750H is actually 3.9 GHz - higher than the maximum single-core Turbo speed of 3.8 GHz on the i7-7700HQ, in fact - while the all-core Turbo speed of the i7-7700HQ is only 3.4 GHz. One of the few times when the i7-7700HQ feels more responsive than the i7-8750H would be navigation of the programs' interfaces.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Aug 13, 2018 Aug 13, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you very much! RjL190365

But in Premiere and After Effects, since a large amount of time is done rendering, the  go with the i7-8750H

I was told After Effects can't use multiple cores to render, so it's better to have a fast single-core clock speed. Is that true?

And how's that for Premiere Pro?

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
LEGEND ,
Aug 13, 2018 Aug 13, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

You will almost always see significantly higher than the base clock speed on any modern CPU that also supports Turbo Boost, in your case. It's the Turbo speed that matters much more than the base clock speed, in this case - and there (clock-speed-wise) is where the older quad-core CPU falls short in single-core mode compared to the newer 6-core CPU in all-core mode.

Premiere Pro can effectively use up to around 8 to 10 CPU cores. (This is the reason why in Premiere Pro, an i7-7700HQ turboing to 3.4 GHz in all-core mode needs more than 70% longer than an i7-8750H turboing to 3.9 GHz in all-core mode just to perform rendering duties.) Beyond that, the law of diminishing returns kicks in big time.

By the way, the maximum Turbo clock speed for both of those CPUs are in single-core mode. However, After Effects absolutely gets choked on a system with only a single-core CPU because a single-core CPU falls far below Adobe's minimum hardware requirement of a multi-core CPU.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines