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Is the i7 3770 Sufficient to Run Premier Pro and After Effects?

New Here ,
Aug 13, 2020 Aug 13, 2020

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There seems to be quite a bit of anecdotal evidence that the i7 3770 is still a capable processor in 2020:

 

See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ni_iZd-pM-M&feature=emb_logo

See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMqC5AEXW4I

 

Do you think it is capable of running Premier Pro and After Effects?

 

 

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LEGEND ,
Aug 13, 2020 Aug 13, 2020

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That eight year old Ivy Bridge gen processor is long past being really useful except for simpler things. Gaming and an NLE are not equivalent things. Not nearly close even.

 

Neil

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New Here ,
Aug 13, 2020 Aug 13, 2020

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Many thanks for your helpful response, Neil. It sounds like I should give up all hope on my 2013 XPS desktop.

 

I also have a 2018 XPS laptop with a i7 8550U and 8GB RAM, but the ram is not upgradable (soldered) and, of course, there is no dedicated graphics card. Do you think I have any hope whatsoever of using Premier Pro on this machine?

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Community Expert ,
Aug 13, 2020 Aug 13, 2020

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Test your computer to find out how well it will work
https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/PugetBench-for-Premiere-Pro-1519/
-Benchmark test program available for Premiere Pro CC2019 and CC2020
https://community.adobe.com/t5/video-hardware/premiere-pro-cpu-performance-intel-core-10th-gen-vs-am...

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New Here ,
Aug 13, 2020 Aug 13, 2020

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Many thanks indeed for these leads.

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Community Expert ,
Aug 13, 2020 Aug 13, 2020

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Moved to the Video Hardware forum.

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New Here ,
Aug 13, 2020 Aug 13, 2020

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OK I have two machines. Are either one of them able to successfully run (or be upgraded to run) Premier Pro/After Effects?

 

1. 2018 Dell XPS laptop: i7 8550U/ 8GB (not upgradable)/ integrated graphics

2. 2013 Dell XPS8500 desktop: i7 3770/ 8GB (upgradable)/ 1GB NVIDIA GeForce GT 640

 

I'm in desparate need of solutions!

 

Many thanks!

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LEGEND ,
Aug 13, 2020 Aug 13, 2020

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The desktop of yours has a few problems:

 

  • The i7-3770 has a relatively slow turbo-boost clock speed by current standards, even  when only one core is in use. After Effects, especially recent versions, is not well multi-threaded to begin with while at the same time demands relatively high CPU clock speeds. Older CPUs simply cannot reach such high clock speeds even under a lightly threaded load.
  • Worse, the i7-3770 simply cannot keep up at all with even a new Comet Lake (10th-Gen) i3 CPU, let alone today's multicore CPUs, in performance. In relation to current Intel and AMD CPUs, the i7-3770 not only falls in between a 10th-Gen quad-core i3 and a Comet Lake-based dual-core Pentium, but it also gets dominated by even the cheapest AMD Ryzen 3 3100 CPU. Only the Ryzen 5 3400G APU (which is actually based on the older Zen+ architecture rather than the newer Zen2 architecture) comes anywhere close to the performance of that i7-3770.
  • To top (or bottom) it all off, the GT 640 is not only old, but it is excruciatingly sluggish by current discrete GPU standards. Worse, the Kepler architecture that it uses has aged very ungracefully, just like every single older-generation Nvidia GPU architecture up to and including the recently discontinued (for midrange and high-end desktop) Pascal.

 

As such, I think you made a wise decision to give up all hope for that desktop PC, especially since the few upgrades that are needed to bring its performance up to even the minimum recommended performance requirement (the GPU, RAM and storage) would cost you as much money as or more money than what the rest of the system combined is currently worth. After all, why spend nearly $500 on new components (based on the average street prices of a GeForce GTX 1650 Super, four 8 GB sticks of DDR3-1600 RAM and a 1 TB 2.5" SATA SSD) just to bring the overall performance of a system whose remaining components (including the CPU) are worth less than $250 combined anywhere close to par? To me, that's just plain foolish.

 

And in addition, you should also give up all hope for your laptop: The low-power (and thus low-clock-speed) 4-core/8-thread CPU is bad enough, but the lack of a discrete GPU and the lack of sufficient RAM will result in your system getting depleted of usable RAM - and when that occurs, your entire laptop will crash, often in the middle of a work job. The culprit, in this case, is the memory subsystem that's shared between the integrated graphics and the main system RAM, and that the integrated graphics can steal more than 6 GB of that paltry 8 GB of RAM just for itself, leaving you with less than 2 GB total available for the software in your system whenever the iGPU is performing heavy video processing. Don't even bother running Creative Cloud at all on that laptop. Now if it had more installed RAM, or if it came with a decent discrete GPU, then maybe.

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New Here ,
Sep 21, 2020 Sep 21, 2020

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I might as well jump in and say I have the I7 3770K with 32GB of RAM, I run After Effects, Premiere Pro AND Photoshop all at the same time without issue. 

A 1080P video render in Premiere does seem to take awhile, so there's that but it works just fine. Off the top of my head I feel like a 15 min video takes about 20 mins to render. It's not the end of the world. 

I have done a full render only to remember I forgot to include something and have to render again, 40 mins down the drain. Can't go wrong with a newer system but I should thought I should let you know things will work just fine on the old system. 

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