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PC for premiere pro and after effects

New Here ,
Jan 05, 2021 Jan 05, 2021

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As the title says, I'm now looking for a PC for video editing. I want to buy a powerful enough machine so I won't have to upgrade again for a few years and be able to smoothly edit 4k footage. Most of the pre-made pcs I'm finding don't have more than 16gb ram so I'll need to upgrade to 32gb at least.

My current old PC has a Geforce Gtx 1060 6gb graphics card that I bought 3 years ago. Is this card worth putting into a new PC? Does it have any value for re-sale?


I'm looking on bestbuy.ca, amazon.ca and https://www.memoryexpress.com/

How about this 1? Is the 500 w power supply a problem? I don't see the motherboard anywhere on the listing. Where could I find that?

https://www.bestbuy.ca/en-ca/product/asus-rog-strix-gl10cs-gaming-pc-iron-grey-intel-core-i7-9700k-1...

Here's an open box for the same price with 850w power supply and NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8GB GDDR6 graphics card.

https://www.bestbuy.ca/en-ca/product/alienware-aurora-r9-gaming-pc-intel-ci7-9700-1tb-hdd-256gb-ssd-...

Any advice much appreciated.

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Hardware or GPU

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Community Expert ,
Jan 05, 2021 Jan 05, 2021

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I recently heard that you make far better use of your GPU if you dedicate it solely to hardware rendering. Apparently (and I did not know this) if you use your GPU for both display and hardware rendering, you could lose a significant portion of the rendering power because the card is split in two when used for both options. However, since display performance typically eats up about 5-10% of the card's capacity, you may end up not using 40-45% of your card for hardware rendering.

 

If you can, attach your monitor(s) to the on-board graphics card and reserve the GPU for hardware rendering...

 

This is my main advice.

 

For this purpose, you may choose to re-house your 1060Gt card and then buy another, more modern card for GPU hardware rendering. I have had a ton of help choosing hardware for my editing station by following the videos of Puget Systems, such as this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63iYIXgOvSg

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Community Expert ,
Jan 05, 2021 Jan 05, 2021

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