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Using a GPU not on the Recommended Video Card List

New Here ,
Feb 18, 2019 Feb 18, 2019

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Hi Guys,

I am building a PC on a budget for personal video projects. Render times are not a huge concern to me.

I have an AMD Ryzen 5 2600 + 16gb of 3000mhz RAM with 1 SSD and 2 HDD

I am trying to save some money on the GPU and am wondering if I can use any Nvidia Cuda card or if it has to be on the recommended list?

Is a 2GB GT 710 DDR5 enough to get Premiere running and editing / scrubbing smoothly? I am also ok with using an older version of CC if that helps (ie: before the GPU requirement was listed as mandatory)?

Thanks!

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

LEGEND , Feb 19, 2019 Feb 19, 2019

Don't waste your money on that GT 710, even with DDR5 memory. It is an extreme weakling of a GPU these days, with only 192 CUDA cores and is based on a low-end version of Kepler (GK208) that should have been put out to pasture three years ago. It is, in fact, weaker in GPU processing for GPU acceleration than your planned CPU alone in software-only mode! Worse, it may prevent your new CPU from ever being fully utilized even if the software load requires it, resulting in your system potentially p

...

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LEGEND ,
Feb 19, 2019 Feb 19, 2019

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Don't waste your money on that GT 710, even with DDR5 memory. It is an extreme weakling of a GPU these days, with only 192 CUDA cores and is based on a low-end version of Kepler (GK208) that should have been put out to pasture three years ago. It is, in fact, weaker in GPU processing for GPU acceleration than your planned CPU alone in software-only mode! Worse, it may prevent your new CPU from ever being fully utilized even if the software load requires it, resulting in your system potentially performing slower overall than even a 13-year-old Intel Core 2 Duo CPU-based rig.

If you really can't afford even the least expensive GPU that's on the "recommended" list, go for a GTX 1050 Ti at a minimum with that rig. Any GPU with at least 2 GB of VRAM (4 GB or more VRAM recommended) will enable CUDA acceleration (with the current (13.0.2) version of Premiere Pro CC), as long as the driver that's compatible with your particular GPU supports CUDA 9.2 or higher (for WHQL drivers, this means version 397.64 or higher).

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New Here ,
Feb 19, 2019 Feb 19, 2019

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Thanks for the detailed answer, really appreciate it!

Would the CPU bottleneck with that GPU also apply to older CC versions? Or just the latest? I'm not sure how the changes in the new version affect GPU usage

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Community Expert ,
Feb 19, 2019 Feb 19, 2019

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mkai33479542  wrote

Would the CPU bottleneck with that GPU also apply to older CC versions?

Yes.

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LEGEND ,
Feb 21, 2019 Feb 21, 2019

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As Peru Bob stated, yes. Even in apps that don't utilize the GPU at all, such as word processing apps! What happens there is that the total available CPU capacity gets capped by the severely underpowered GPU to some level that's much, much less than 100% of its capability. That has the effect of capping your would-be new rig's performance on absolutely everything, even in programs that don't use the GPU at all, to the level of a 10-year-old quad-core CPU-based PC (if not worse).

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New Here ,
Feb 21, 2019 Feb 21, 2019

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Thanks guys, I have gone for the 1050ti with 4gb just to be safe

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