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Will my HP Envy X360 support Adobe Premiere Pro

New Here ,
Dec 22, 2020 Dec 22, 2020

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Hi, I'm really new to video editing and not much of an IT expert. I was wondering if anybody could advise me regarding this. I've read the minimum specs on the adobe site and I think maybe my laptop falls below in a few areas. For example my graphics card just says AMD Radeon whereas the minimum seems to be a Radeon Pro.

 

Will this mean that Premiere Pro won't work at all, or would it still work but not up to it's full potential?

Also, and I'm sure I should know what this is, there is a minimum network storage connection - does this mean I need cloud storage?

 

Thanks for any advice

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Community Expert ,
Dec 22, 2020 Dec 22, 2020

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Moved to hardware forum.

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LEGEND ,
Dec 22, 2020 Dec 22, 2020

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We need to know the exact model and specs of that computer. The Envy x360 comes with a choice of Intel and AMD CPUs, whereas the AMD-powered models almost always come with integrated on-CPU AMD Radeon Vega graphics (no discrete GPU). The Intel-powered models come with either integrated Intel graphics or a very-low-end discrete Nvidia GeForce MX-series mobile GPU that has neither NVDEC nor NVENC support at all whatsoever.

 

That said, if you have "AMD Radeon" graphics in that Envy x360 laptop, it's a giveaway that you have some form of an AMD Ryzen CPU with integrated AMD Radeon Vega graphics. As such, that laptop will render slower than (literally) a turtle, especially if the CPU that's in your particular laptop is an AMD Ryzen 3000-series APU (which is actually a Zen+/Ryzen 2000-series-derived architecture rather than the Zen2 architecture of Ryzen 3000-series CPUs without an integrated GPU).

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New Here ,
Dec 29, 2020 Dec 29, 2020

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  • Hey. Thanks for the response. It is a Ryzen 7 4700U. The graphics card is a AMD Radeon (TM). If I need to upgrade the graphics card, what would you recommend? Is there anything else that I should be looking at? Really appreciate the advice.

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LEGEND ,
Dec 29, 2020 Dec 29, 2020

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In that laptop the Radeon GPU is not a discrete one, but it is just an integrated on-CPU Radeon Vega 7. And no laptop in this class can be upgraded internally at all (as far as the GPU is concerned). Plus, an external GPU won't work properly on that laptop as it lacks Thunderbolt support at all whatsoever.

 

In other words, you're stuck with what that laptop already has. Just about the only part that can be upgraded, if at all, would be the RAM.

 

And I have seen results with that APU without a discrete GPU in the Puget System's PugetBench results list. It is widely variable. The best results were still below the level of a four-year-old quad-core CPU-based desktop PC with a typical discrete GPU of its vintage, while the worst scored worse than even a 7-year-old dual-core CPU-based PC. There variances mainly boil down to the differences in the storage (disk) systems, where the worst probably used a slow 5400 RPM HDD as its sole disk.

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New Here ,
Dec 30, 2020 Dec 30, 2020

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Thanks for all the info. I guess I'll be getting a new laptop in that case.

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LEGEND ,
Jan 02, 2021 Jan 02, 2021

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I wouldn't rush getting a new laptop yet. It depends on how much RAM you have in that laptop, as well as what SSD that you have in that laptop (whether SATA or PCI-e), plus you might need additional external SSDs for your source footage and project files. Unfortunately, you have only USB 3.1 Gen 1 ports in that laptop (retroactively renamed as USB 3.2 Gen 1x1), which means that any external devices plugged into your laptop is limited to around 450 MB/s in writes (500 MB/s in reads). With the addition of an external USB 3.2 Gen 1x1-compatible SSD, that laptop should perform fairly respectably, if not quite at the level of a four-year-old quad-core CPU-powered desktop.

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