Noise Reduction Destruction

New Here ,
Jul 24, 2017 Jul 24, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi Adobe Community,

I am currently working on an audio strip that contains an interview of a friend for a video that I first worked on in Premiere Pro -- I merely wanted to reduce the background noise within the clip so I exported and imported the clip into Adobe Audition. This is my first time using Audition so I was following some tutorials and it had me take the 'noise print' of the background noise I wanted to eliminate and although it did minimize a majority of the noise in the background it seemed to greatly affect the main audio foundation of the interview. Then my friend's voice became very gurgily and some what metallic.The tutorial did advise me that this would happen since noise reduction process is a very finicky and powerful tool. Later the tutorial had me use 'adaptive noise reduction' to take care of this gurgily and metallic sound. However, this only took care of some more background noise and hardly touched the distorted sound that was affected after reducing the noise.

I had the noise reduction bar setting in 'noise reduction process' around 80dB and the 'reduce by' setting at 30. My advance settings were:

- Spectral decay rate: 10%

- Precision Factor: 15

- Smoothing: 900

- Transition Width: 15 dB

I didn't think that was too bad and I recorded everything on a rode mic. I have fiddled with these settings all I can, having some up and some down and nothing seems to get rid of this metallic gurgily effect. Honestly, I have followed many tutorials about this issue but I can't seem to find one that can directly pinpoint that gurgily after effect once the noise reduction is applied. Any help to solve this issue would be greatly appreciated! Thanks everyone!

Here are the links to some of the tutorials I followed:

Advanced Noise Reduction in Audition - YouTube

Removing Background Noise From Audio With Adobe Audition CC - YouTube

How To Make Your Voice Sound Better (Secrets Revealed) - YouTube

HOW TO MAKE YOUR VOICE SOUND PERFECT FOR VIDEO | AUDITION CC TUTORIAL - YouTube

Views

3.1K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
LEGEND ,
Jul 25, 2017 Jul 25, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The artefacts that you are hearing are due to trying to remove too much noise all at once. The general advice is to do several passes at no more than about, at the most, 10db of noise reduction. Increase the FFT size at each pass and take a new noise sample for each.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 25, 2017 Jul 25, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

If you want a little more detail about this, then try reading this thread:

Workflow for noise reduction and speech volume level

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
LEGEND ,
Jul 25, 2017 Jul 25, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Nov 12, 2019 Nov 12, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

this link has a great title! and it comes up when i google the subject as well. but i'm guessing it's part of the old forum. because it's gone! or... did anyone save it? (like the author maybe? here's hoping!)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jul 25, 2017 Jul 25, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi ryclark, I really appreciate you responding so quickly. I took your advice and slowly applied smaller reductions with increasing FFT sizes with each pass. Though I didn't hear the audio getting any better, I feel it just continued to get worse.

Does the percentage of the Noise Reduction stay at 10% and the Reduce by setting at 10dB as well, or should those change with each pass? And as far as the advanced settings should I just leave those alone? Thanks!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
People's Champ ,
Jul 26, 2017 Jul 26, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Yes, Noise Reduction slider should stay at 10% (maybe 15% in a pinch) and keep the amount of reduction around 10dB (which, if you think about it, is a fairly big level change.  As before, start with a relatively low FTP setting, then increase by one preset for each pass.  This will normally do a good job of reducing any relatively continuous background noise--air conditioning, hiss from a mic pre amp, that sort of thing.

A couple of things...for this to work you need to have gone back to you original recording.  It doesn't remove artefacts from something you've already tried NR on.

Second, you haven't told us what kind of noise you are trying to remove.  The NR process is great on continuous back ground noise but if you have something variable, you may find you get more luck with the Sound Remover tool.  There's a tutorial here:  Use the Sound Remover effect |   Obviously this also needs you to go back to your original.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 26, 2017 Jul 26, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

https://forums.adobe.com/people/Bob+Howes  wrote

Yes, Noise Reduction slider should stay at 10% (maybe 15% in a pinch) and keep the amount of reduction around 10dB (which, if you think about it, is a fairly big level change.  As before, start with a relatively low FTP setting, then increase by one preset for each pass.

I'd say that 10dB was too much for a single pass, especially at a low FFT setting. I've always got better results when removing no more than 6dB at a time, although you might get away with a bit more than that at a really high FFT setting.

Because the size of the analysis 'window' varies in inverse proportion to the FFT number, the higher the number, the smaller the window. And, it stands to reason that this is reflected in the size of the artifacts. So an individual 'bubble' artifact is going to be a lot larger and more noticeable with a lower FFT size than it will be with a larger one...

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
LEGEND ,
Jul 26, 2017 Jul 26, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Perhaps you could post a clip from the original recording somewhere like Dropbox for us to take a listen and advise. It must be in it's original .wav format for it to be of any use for analysis.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jul 26, 2017 Jul 26, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

So the noise I am trying to remove is consistent through the entire clip -- and it's just merely room/background noise underneath the interview. Honestly I figured it would be easier to remove but it's proven difficult. I am using the original recording, I haven't added any effects or changes to it since importing it from the original interview recordings. All I did was export and import it into Audition as a nested file.

I'll try posting the recording on Dropbox, but I assume I would need your emails for you to be sent it or view it. If that is alright with you. I've already posted it. Let me know!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 27, 2017 Jul 27, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

PG_93  wrote

I'll try posting the recording on Dropbox, but I assume I would need your emails for you to be sent it or view it. If that is alright with you. I've already posted it. Let me know!

If you post it into Dropbox's 'public' folder, you can right-click on the file and get a direct public link to it. All you have to do is copy that, and post it here...

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jul 31, 2017 Jul 31, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Sorry for responding so late, but here is the link to the audio file:

Dropbox - WNAUDIO.wav

I could use all the help I can get, I really want the audio to sound good!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 01, 2017 Aug 01, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I can get the noise in this to reduce reasonably well using three passes (but see further on in this reply). The settings I've used typically have the NR set to 60%, Reduction set to 5dB and in Advanced, set the Smoothing value to at least 700 - in terms of reducing bubbly noise, this can be significant. I started with an FFT of 16,384 and then resampled the remaining noise, and did a pass at 4096, and repeated this process at 512, removing only a small amount at each pass.

The worst problem with the original is that somebody seems to have gated it, and in the process lost amplitude at the start of one of the clips. It really is a lot easier to start with absolutely unprocessed audio, straight from the recording.

The other thing that's not helping this too much is that in the noise, there's a lot of room tone, as whoever was speaking was nowhere near close enough to the mic. Contrary to what it may say in the tutorial, Adaptive NR will NOT help clean this up - unfortunately, nothing will, as it isn't noise as such, but early reflections that are intrinsically now part of the recorded speech - sort-of like ingredients baked into a cake; you can't unbake them. The upshot of this is that you really will have to take this in very gentle stages to get any sort of acceptable result at all. That said, even with what you've posted I can make a significant improvement, as outlined above.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Aug 04, 2017 Aug 04, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi SteveG,

Thanks for reviewing that file and editing it, really appreciate it. Yeah I at this point I figured that some of the noise is engrained into the audio which is a real bummer but unfortunately it happens. Would there be any way for you to send me the file that you were able to edit, perhaps it is better than any of the ones I edited?

Thanks!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 06, 2017 Aug 06, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I don't tend to keep these, but if you use the same settings I did, you'll end up with the same result.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Jul 27, 2017 Jul 27, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Yes, Noise Reduction slider should stay at 10% (maybe 15% in a pinch) and keep the amount of reduction around 10dB (which, if you think about it, is a fairly big level change.  As before, start with a relatively low FTP setting, then increase by one preset for each pass.  This will normally do a good job of reducing any relatively continuous background noise--air conditioning, hiss from a mic pre amp, that sort of thing.

hi

it's a great start for every kind of noise isn't it?

i will save as preset , what's about the advanced ? are the default a good point to start

spectral 65%

smoothing 1

precision factor 7

transition 0dB

about fft size 4096 is too high , are 1024 & 2048 the best start

thanks

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 27, 2017 Jul 27, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Giovannivolontè  wrote

about fft size 4096 is too high , are 1024 & 2048 the best start

Not unless you've got really deep constant rumble, and you really don't need more than 3-4dB NR levels with them. Ideally you wouldn't use these numbers on anything below about 200Hz! This is all to do with the way 'windowing' works, and how much of any given part of a waveform the 'window' can see. HIgh FFT numbers create smaller windows, and these can 'get into' higher frequency parts of the waveform, whereas the larger windows misinterpret what's there completely, which is another reason for all the bubbly noise...

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Jul 27, 2017 Jul 27, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

hi

i 'm really doing right now and yes

The general advice is to do several passes at no more than about, at the most, 10db of noise reduction. Increase the FFT size at each pass and take a new noise sample for each.

makes a great difference!

thanks Ryclark

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines