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How can I reproduce this (geometrical figure with one half filled with a pattern)?

Contributor ,
Mar 23, 2021 Mar 23, 2021

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Dear all,

the graphic designer left the workgroup and I have to learn, reproduce and continue their work.

I am trying to reverse engineer the SVGs they sent us before but I cannot understand how to create these geometrical figures so that half of them (or a part of them) is filled with the diagonal strokes you can see in this picture.

Screenshot 2021-03-23 at 17.29.29.png

The geometrical figures are easy enough, no problem, as well as their division in more or less proportional parts, but how to create those regular strokes?

When I enter isolation mode up to those lines I get this picture:

Screenshot 2021-03-23 at 17.29.19.png

Could you please help me reverse-engineer this?

Thank you very much

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Draw and design, How to, Tools

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Mar 23, 2021 Mar 23, 2021
Since it's an SVG, this is a clipping mask. Inside Illustrator you could also use a pattern.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 23, 2021 Mar 23, 2021

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Since it's an SVG, this is a clipping mask.

Inside Illustrator you could also use a pattern.

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Contributor ,
Mar 23, 2021 Mar 23, 2021

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Thank you.

I am just beginning to learn Illustrator (my learning started 2 weeks ago, FYI).

Could you please illustrate (pun intended) me how best to do this? 

Both as a clipping mask and as a pattern. 

Thanks

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 23, 2021 Mar 23, 2021

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As a clipping mask: create whatever "fill" you want, draw the path on top, select all and Object > Clipping mask > Make

 

Bildschirmfoto 2021-03-23 um 23.02.29.png

 

For a pattern, use the Pattern editing tool (see documentation) to create a pattern and then apply it. Make patterns horizontal or vertical and rotate them after applying using the transform tools (see documentation)

 

https://helpx.adobe.com/illustrator/how-to/create-apply-patterns.html

https://helpx.adobe.com/no/illustrator/user-guide.html/no/illustrator/using/transforming-objects.ug....

 

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Contributor ,
Mar 24, 2021 Mar 24, 2021

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Thanks! I'll do my best to try this but maybe it's better to start from scratch because in the current state of the SVG (attached) I seem unable to select the "fill" (the slanted lines) and make them be applied to a new path.

Creating a new path in a new figure, selecting the lines and the path and then Object > Clipping Mask > Create only makes the lines disappear from the other figure (100% me doing something wrong, just thinking out-loud).

I'll report back if I cannot do this but still, your answer is the correct one.

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 24, 2021 Mar 24, 2021

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Please show screenshots of your process and embed them in your posts. Also: please do include the layers panel, because the stacking order of objects is important for this.

 

You can copy objects from an existing clipping mask, you would just need toedit it in isolation mode.

 

I would suggest you read a few chapters of the documentation about handling selections, the layers panel, the isolation mode. Those concepts are important for understanding and editing other peoples' artwork.

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Contributor ,
Mar 25, 2021 Mar 25, 2021

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Update!

By double-clicking to the core I managed to isolate the pattern (or object) that was used to make the fill in the SVG.

Screenshot 2021-03-25 at 12.15.29.png

I then added it to my CC Library so that I could insert it elsewhere. 

Created a path equal to half the pentagon I needed, changed the layer so that it sit on top of that object and made the clipping mask. So, at least, I can work around this. 

My last question is: if I have multiple geometrical figures, can I have all of them be clipping mask for that same object? If so, how?

Right now I have to reinsert the same object multiple times, once per every figure. 

This is what I see: the single lines are what the previous designer did, the frame to the right is what I did.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/hy1hu6sgn8ab700/Illustrator%20Clipping%20Mask.mov?dl=0 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 25, 2021 Mar 25, 2021

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You would have to first combine all the shapes to a compound path. And then you can make them into a clipping mask.

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