Websites stripping EXIF data?

Contributor ,
Mar 06, 2017 Mar 06, 2017

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Hi

I just did an experiment where I downloaded a photo I have taken and uploaded to LinkedIn and noticed that the EXIF data is missing. Basically any author data is missing making this photo available and free to anyone to use.

When I open the original exported JPEG on my desktop (using Mac Preview) all that data exists so how can it be stripped when published online? I thought that the point of EXIF data was to reduce or eliminate the risk of malicious use of photos.

Thanks

Mic

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Mar 06, 2017 Mar 06, 2017

The point under discussion here is that it does not matter if you include EXIF (meta)data in Lightroom then upload the image, LinkedIn and other social media sites strip it out by design

Did You Know That Social Media Sites Strip Images of IPTC Metadata? – Libris Visual Storytelling Blog

What Social Networks Protect Your EXIF (And GPS Location) Data From Other Users? – GPS For Today

I assume the reasons include security and privacy of the individuals in the images.

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Adobe Employee ,
Mar 06, 2017 Mar 06, 2017

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Hi studiomigo,

You need to save the metadata to the file so that it should save the EXIF data within the image.

Select one or more photos in the Grid view of the Library module and choose Metadata > Save Metadata To File(s), or press Ctrl+S (Windows) or Command+S (Mac OS)

Refer the article for information: Metadata basics and actions in Lightroom

Let us know if that helps.

Regards,

Mohit

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 06, 2017 Mar 06, 2017

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The point under discussion here is that it does not matter if you include EXIF (meta)data in Lightroom then upload the image, LinkedIn and other social media sites strip it out by design

Did You Know That Social Media Sites Strip Images of IPTC Metadata? – Libris Visual Storytelling Blo...

What Social Networks Protect Your EXIF (And GPS Location) Data From Other Users? – GPS For Today

I assume the reasons include security and privacy of the individuals in the images.

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Contributor ,
Mar 06, 2017 Mar 06, 2017

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Thanks Mohit

i do save my metadata even though I add the metadata during the import process. I don't understand why the need to save metadata if it's already included and I can see it after exporting the file.

I guess John's answer is the correct one which I will investigate farther. If that's true it's really disturbing that some sites strip off IPTC and EXIF data as it means they can do whatever they want with the image.

Cheers

Micha

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 06, 2017 Mar 06, 2017

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as it means they can do whatever they want with the image.

I guess social media sites would say that uploaded images are low res and are unlikely to be used outside their social media platform. The EXIF may also contain sensitive info such as where you live, give clues as to your movements (for example leaving home to go on vacation) and divulge when the photo was taken.

Additionally, they may say that unwanted EXIF data in almost all the millions of images on their platform would consume unnecessary file space and add to download times.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 06, 2017 Mar 06, 2017

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studiomigo  wrote

If that's true it's really disturbing that some sites strip off IPTC and EXIF data as it means they can do whatever they want with the image.

That's not how copyright law works, at least not in Europe. Full copyright to the photographer exists from the moment the shutter is released, regardless of anything else. Marking the file as copyrighted is redundant and not required. It's implicit.

Of course, the photographer's name needs to be associated with the image in some way. But that can be in a caption, it doesn't have to be embedded in the file.

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Contributor ,
Mar 06, 2017 Mar 06, 2017

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A caption will be hard to trance no? Do you want to tell me that marketing ads on FB or Instagram that use propriety photos are not copyrighted or have some embedded data that can be traced?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 06, 2017 Mar 06, 2017

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I'm just telling you how the legislation works. If you find your work used inappropriately, the copyright is there, metadata or not. It's easy enough to remove if that was all it took.

But I also think that social media and copyright are incompatible entities. If you worry about usage, don't post them there.

Copyright was invented to protect printed, physical material. It doesn't really work well on the internet, and it's almost impossible to enforce or follow up. That's why Creative Commons license models are becoming increasingly common. That doesn't mean free for all, but accepting that distribution is almost impossible to prevent, you instead specify conditions for that distribution. Naming the author, no alterations, no commercial use, that sort of thing.

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Contributor ,
Mar 06, 2017 Mar 06, 2017

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Cool thanks.

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