Photoshop CS5 Qualified Graphic Cards

Community Beginner ,
Apr 28, 2010 Apr 28, 2010

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Updating computers to Windows 7 64bit with a new graphics card and need to know Adobe's recommended graphic cards for Photoshop CS5. Is there any information regarding this. They have them listed for Photoshop CS4. I would like to be like a good carpenter and measure twice and only cut once.

Thanks.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 28, 2010 Apr 28, 2010

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Photoshop doesn't rely heavily on the video card so you'll be fine with any discrete card made by Ati or Nvidia in the last ~5 years

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New Here ,
Nov 25, 2010 Nov 25, 2010

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I have a Radion 600 258mb

card that runs my video editing fine but it

is not enough to us the 3d in cs5 it says

I need to upgrade my driver are my video card. openGL is disabled.

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Participant ,
Jun 17, 2011 Jun 17, 2011

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Why even get a video card?

Most processors come with built-in graphics.

Is Photoshop going to run any better with a graphics card than with a system's integrated graphics, especially if you hve a SandyBridge processor with Intel's HD3000 integrated graphics?

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LEGEND ,
Jun 17, 2011 Jun 17, 2011

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Because Intel's OpenGL drivers basically suck.

-Noel

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Participant ,
Jun 17, 2011 Jun 17, 2011

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Hi Noel,

Can you elaborate on how "sucky" Open GL Drivers would make Photoshop underperform?

Could you please cite evidence indicating that Intel's Open GL Drivers "suck?"

And, does this apply to  Intel's SandyBridge CPUs which have the vastly improved integrated graphics compared to earlier Intel offerings?

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LEGEND ,
Jun 17, 2011 Jun 17, 2011

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I develop OpenGL applications myself.  I recently ran a big beta test, and I had virtually no problems with ATI-equipped systems, some problems with nVidia-equipped systems, and a whole bunch of serious problems with systems with Intel GPUs, some of which actually required re-architecting my software.  Just one of many major issues is that while the OpenGL standards support the ability to pass a rendering context between threads, the actuality of Intel's driver implementation is that if you do this you will utterly CRASH the application.  ATI and nVidia drivers deal with it just fine.

Intel's poor OpenGL implementations literally cost me several months delay in releasing my OpenGL products.  At one point I was wondering whether to even allow my users to enable OpenGL acceleration on an Intel GPU at all, though I ultimately did find sufficient workarounds to their problems to make it work.

I don't believe any of the systems my beta testers used were specifically Sandy Bridge-equipped, but since an OpenGL implementation is HUGELY complex, it's a fair assumption that they're using at least some of the same architecture for implementing the drivers as they have used for their past GPUs.  It would be practically impossible to build an OpenGL implementation from the ground up in less than several years.  It's that enormously complex.

I have great respect for Intel for their processor development, and Intel's latest drivers do seem to be improving, but it appears they have still a long way to go in tidying up their implementation of OpenGL.

So, regarding how well Photoshop is going to work with an Intel GPU...  I can only guess that Adobe has already had to work around many of the problems I saw, but there are advanced operations that I could never get to work on Intel-based systems, and like Adobe, I had to implement several OpenGL "modes" to compensate.  So you might find that Photoshop will only run in Basic OpenGL mode, if it enables OpenGL at all, with an Intel GPU.  And it might just be less stable over long-term use.

I certainly hope that Intel adds some discipline to their OpenGL driver software development process and comes up to to speed soon.  More competition is certainly better for us.  They're just not there yet.

My confidence is high that each new ATI driver release will work, though they have occasionally caused unexpected problems (their recent 11.3 and 11.4 releases broke OpenGL in Photoshop).  It's less high that nVidia will release good drivers every time, especially with video cards that are no longer current.  At this point I simply have even less confidence in Intel, even with their latest GPUs.  They'll need to prove themselves.

-Noel

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New Here ,
Jun 17, 2011 Jun 17, 2011

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Noel,

Thanks for the excellent description of the problems. It would be great if you could make this information known to publishers of PC & photo-related media, such as PC World, Maximum PC, and Popular Photography. All of these have had articles related to Photoshop and/or Sandy Bridge, many of which (but not all) have given the impression that we don't really need graphics cards. This might be true for general users, but not for advanced amateurs and pro's who do serious graphics. Your discussion might help clarify the situation for their readers.

Regards,

DocDJ

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LEGEND ,
Jun 17, 2011 Jun 17, 2011

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Problem is, while I have some insight into display driver implementations, it's hard for me to extrapolate to Photoshop the problems I've had with my own products.  Clearly Adobe has some brilliant people doing OpenGL development, and I'm awed by the fact that a company with as much at stake as Adobe has embraced OpenGL for their serious applications (opposed to video games, which have led the development of new GPU technology and still are).  I think getting GPUs to offload the CPUs is leading to a brighter future for us all, in which our computers will do 100x more graphics stuff in the same amount of time (and with floating point accuracy), all the while CPUs are starting to max out their clock speeds.

For all I know Photoshop may actually work marvelously on a Sandy Bridge GPU using Intel's latest drivers.  But I wouldn't bet on it just yet.  Once bitten, twice shy.

-Noel

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Participant ,
Jun 18, 2011 Jun 18, 2011

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I wonder if it depends on what you are doing with Photoshiop, also.       For instance, I wonder if photo editing even requires Open GL.       As compared to doing something  that involves a 3D effect and rendering.

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LEGEND ,
Jun 18, 2011 Jun 18, 2011

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Photoshop CS4/CS5 do use OpenGL to display 2D images, to add some interactive UI features, and to do some of the pixel processing for display preparation.  For example, Adobe has implemented color-management that runs on the GPU when you set Photoshop for "Normal" or "Advanced" modes.

These pages describes Photoshop's GPU use in some detail:

http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/405/kb405745.html

http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/404/kb404898.html

-Noel

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New Here ,
Jun 19, 2011 Jun 19, 2011

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Hi.

I'm getting the same message in PS CS5 ('No GPU options available with Photoshop Standard') with a Nividia GeForce 6600 GT. I noticed Adobe don't have this on their list of tested cards.

I have updated to the latest driver.

Does anyone know if this is a problem with this particular card, or is there a system setting somewhere - I've checked that there are no extra drivers on the system.

Running Windows XP 64bit 2GB RAM

Thanks

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 29, 2010 Apr 29, 2010

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You should not have any problems with any decent card as long as it isn't from the 10 bucks "budget" tray at WalMart.

Mylenium

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Participant ,
Apr 29, 2010 Apr 29, 2010

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Get a card capable of at least OpenGL 2.0, with at least 512MB of on-board RAM. (Photoshop will find a use for 1GB if you have it.)

If NVIDIA, then a GeForce GTX 285 is currently a very good choice. I don't know current ATI cards.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 29, 2010 Apr 29, 2010

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The price of the GTX 285 skyrocketed in the past months since nvidia basically stopped making anything from GTX 260 and up so there's absolutely no reason to buy one of those cards. If all you'll use is Photoshop then any ~100$ card will do (even cheaper cards will do just fine if you can't spare the money).

Also, no point in worrying about OpenGL 2.0 support as you won't find any PCI-e cards that don't support it (or Shader Model 3.0 for that matter)

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Participant ,
Apr 29, 2010 Apr 29, 2010

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The price of the GTX 285 skyrocketed in the past months since nvidia basically stopped making anything from GTX 260 and up so there's absolutely no reason to buy one of those cards.

There is absolutely no logic in this sentence. Hard to know what you mean.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 29, 2010 Apr 29, 2010

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Nvidia stopped the production of the GTX 260, 275 and 285 which lead to huge price hikes to those cards so now a GTX 285 costs more than a Radeon 5850 even though it's slower. There is absolutely no (sane) reason to buy a GTX 285 at the current prices, especially not for Photoshop where you won't notice the difference between a 50$ and a 500$ video card.

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Participant ,
Apr 29, 2010 Apr 29, 2010

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Where is this pasted from?

NVIDIA don't (usually) make graphics cards. They make graphics controllers, and provide reference designs for graphics cards. Stopping production of a particular card is not in their capacity to choose. You're talking nonsense.

Where I am (in New Zealand), the price of a GTX 285 has hardly moved in the past year.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 29, 2010 Apr 29, 2010

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Nitpicking eh? i can do that: nvidia doesn't make graphics controllers, they don't make anything at all as they're a fabless company so they put TSMC to make their chips and then hand off the assembly of the reference designs to Foxconn or whoever.

The fact that nvidia stopped the production of their high end GPU's a while back isn't official but they might as well have as after the Radeon 5xxx series showed up the supply of high-end stuff from nvidia started to disappear and a lot of nvidia board partners discontinued their GTX series cards. Check for yourself, just google GTX 285 eol. You can also check the prices from NewEgg, the GTX 285 starts from 350$ while being slower than a 5850 that starts from 310$. When Ati introduced their 5xxx series the normal response for nvidia would have been to lower their prices but that hasn't happened, instead the supply went down so the prices started to go up, compare the prices of today to those from around september 2009 and you'll see (the prices should have dropped by ~100$ for the 285 to compete with the 5850)

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Participant ,
Apr 29, 2010 Apr 29, 2010

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Yes, nitpicking, not worth it, quite right. And perhaps you're right and the production of G200 series chips has stopped or will soon stop. But to say that the price of GTX 285 has skyrocketed, when what you seem to mean is that the prices have stayed about the same in circumstances where you would have expected them to fall, is, well, not what you meant to say. I'd still buy the GTX 285 today, and think it's still good value. (In preference to a GTX 470 or 480.) I stick with NVIDIA only because I use software that does GPGPU computing via CUDA. I expect you're right to steer towards ATI instead for best current value.

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Community Beginner ,
May 12, 2010 May 12, 2010

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Zeno Bokor wrote:

nvidia doesn't make graphics controllers, they don't make anything at all as they're a fabless company so they put TSMC to make their chips and then hand off the assembly of the reference designs to Foxconn or whoever.

That's like saying developers don't make programs, the compilers do. Nvidia develops GPUs and chipsets.

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Guru ,
Apr 29, 2010 Apr 29, 2010

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Wait until PS CS5 30 day free trial listed. Download that, give it a test spin and if it works with your card that you have now then there is no need to update and waste money.

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New Here ,
Aug 03, 2010 Aug 03, 2010

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I'm runing WIndows 7- 64 bit and have an ATI 4850 graphics card with CS5 trial and latest updates to both ATI  driver and CS5. CS5 still says there is a GPU problem and when I look in "preferences/Performance", there is NO video card detected. Every time I re-enable the GPU, CS5 turns it back off. Anybody have any hints? The ATI 4000 series is a supported GPU.

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LEGEND ,
Aug 03, 2010 Aug 03, 2010

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Probably some leftover driver junk. Uninstall your video card drivers, restart your system into Safe Mode, run DriverSweeper* to get rid of the leftovers and then install some new drivers

* http://www.guru3d.com/category/driversweeper/

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New Here ,
Aug 03, 2010 Aug 03, 2010

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Zeno Bokor wrote:

Probably some leftover driver junk. Uninstall your video card drivers, restart your system into Safe Mode, run DriverSweeper* to get rid of the leftovers and then install some new drivers

* http://www.guru3d.com/category/driversweeper/

Zebo,

Thanks for the info. I have completely uninstalled ALL ATI programs and drivers and have run DriverSweeper in Safe mode, then re-installed CCC with all options except the game demo. Still no help

CS5 doesn't even SEE my video card (in Preferences/Performance). I don't know of any other apps that test for the card,so I can't really say if THIS PARTICULAR failure is a driver problem or if CS5 just doesn't use the proper recognition-trigger for the card. My error message says, "Photoshop has encountered a problem with the display driver and has temporarily disabled GPU parameters." There's more, but not relevant.

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