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Real estate “window pull”

New Here ,
Jan 18, 2021 Jan 18, 2021

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I am new to real estate photography and I'm wondering if it's possible to use elements to create a layer with a layer mask to lighten up over exposed windows. It appears most photographers use Lightroom/Photoshop to do this. Does anyone know of this is possible with Elements?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 18, 2021 Jan 18, 2021

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Photoshop Elements has most of the tools in Photoshop to deal with overexposed parts of your photos, and the same techniques do apply. You can download a trial version for 30 days to test by yourself. In your case, you'll find that even tutorials and videos for Photoshop will work the same.

Note that Photoshop editing is not the only factor to get a realistic tones balance between indoor and windows:  it's often important to deal with the issue in the shooting session. You can use fill light, you can use bracketed exposure on a tripod and use exposure Photomerge option in Elements afterwards.

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New Here ,
Jan 19, 2021 Jan 19, 2021

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I took a ambient shot and flash shot of the window on a tripod. So that's essentially the bracketed exposure you are speaking of correct? It does look like the photomerge feature is what I'm looking for. 
 
Looks like it's just a different way to accomplish a window pull. The process I see others do is put the overexposed picture over the underexposed picture and then paint over the overexposed area to bring the colors out. Can this be done on Elements?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 19, 2021 Jan 19, 2021

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The process I see others do is put the overexposed picture over the underexposed picture and then paint over the overexposed area to bring the colors out. Can this be done on Elements?

Yes, absolutely no difference with Photoshop, everything is available.

You are using layers and masks.

If you want more flexible 'burning', you can use the same 'paint with light' techniques.

I recommend shooting raw to take advantage of the increased dynamic range; your highlights are less likely to be clipped than with jpegs.

 

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