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Productions migration process from standalone to Productions unclear!

Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 13, 2020 Apr 13, 2020

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In the Productions documentation, for migrating an existing standalone project to a Production process, these are the entire instructions:

 

Migrate an Existing Project to a Production
If your work uses a single project file
1. Create a new production
• A new Untitled project is created and it can be left alone;
2. Use the Add Project to Production command to bring the existing standalone project into the production;
3. Open the added project;
4. Create a new project for each bin, then move the contents of each bin into a corresponding project in the production. Leave all the projects open while doing this step
5. When the original project file is empty it can be renamed to be used later or put in the trash.

 

What the hay does the comment "and it can be left alone" in Step 1 mean in real-life?

 

Step four is completely non-sensical. So if I have a project with bins for say media, graphics, audio, and sequences, each of those is supposed to be a completely new and different project file? I have five media clips in a bin, that's supposed to be a complete project in and of itself?

 

What the ... ????

 

Neil

 

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correct answers 2 Correct answers

Adobe Employee , Apr 13, 2020 Apr 13, 2020
Hi Neil! Sorry the steps there aren't clear, I can take this feedback and make them more clear. First though to answer your questions: What does 'it can be left alone' in step 1 mean? Well, the gist of this process is to create a new Production, import your existing project, then break it apart into multiple projects. When you create a new Production you get an empty project to start with, and we figured in writing these steps that rather than twist into a verbal pretzel explaining all the thi...

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Adobe Employee , Apr 13, 2020 Apr 13, 2020
You don't need to open the standalone project at all. 1. Create a new production 2. Use "Add Project to Production" to add a copy of the project to your production 3. Break apart that project as you see fit

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Adobe Employee ,
Apr 13, 2020 Apr 13, 2020

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In step one, when a new Production is created, a new untitled project is created by defaut within it - you may rename it or ignore it.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 13, 2020 Apr 13, 2020

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So ... is it basically a house-keeping file? Or is it a space-filler until there are more projects in the folder? It would be nice to know.

 

What about the Step 4 stuff ... very unclear what that means. And I've rather a few years spent working with the app and asking tons of questions from Jarle & others ...

 

Neil

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Adobe Employee ,
Apr 13, 2020 Apr 13, 2020

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Hi Neil! Sorry the steps there aren't clear, I can take this feedback and make them more clear. First though to answer your questions:

 

What does 'it can be left alone' in step 1 mean? Well, the gist of this process is to create a new Production, import your existing project, then break it apart into multiple projects. When you create a new Production you get an empty project to start with, and we figured in writing these steps that rather than twist into a verbal pretzel explaining all the things you could do with that project, we just wrote it to leave it alone since you don't need it.

 

Your interpretation of step 4 is spot on. See the graphic early in the document that shows a sample project and how that project might look translated to a Production. The tricky thing is you don't _have_ to do it that way...that's just how most, especially those collaborating will do it. What was a bin in a single project would be a project in the Production.

 

If you're a solo editor, yeah that might be too much breaking up. No problem – do what works for you!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 13, 2020 Apr 13, 2020

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Matt,

 

The steps for moving things aren't clear. Do you need both the project in Productions open and the standalone project open separately and drag/drop ... what?

 

Neil

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Adobe Employee ,
Apr 13, 2020 Apr 13, 2020

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You don't need to open the standalone project at all.

 

1. Create a new production

2. Use "Add Project to Production" to add a copy of the project to your production

3. Break apart that project as you see fit

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