"Go to selected clip end" goes one frame before the clip end

Participant ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi,

When I press the shortcut for "go to selected clip end" the cursor goes just one frame before the very end of the clip like this :

2019-05-02 13_04_13-Adobe Premiere Pro 2019 - H__Rushs_Mexique_Guerrero_Pamela + Marcos_Projects_Pre.png

It was not like this before I think it appeared after the april update

How can I fix this ?

Views

3.1K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019
***UPDATE***It was determined that this is a behavior update and NOT a bug. However, i'm keeping the Report link in case some users wanted to up-vote for a feature.It looks like this is a bug. I was able to recreate it.However, if you right click on the timeline's work area and select "Show audio time units", the behavior seems to be corrected.I have filed a bug report, please upvote: "go to select clip end" bug: Goes one frame before clip's end – Adobe video & audio appsKevin-Monahan​ Can you p...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Behavior might have changed.

The cursor is now on the last frame and not on the first frame of the next clip.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
LEGEND ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Use Go to Next Edit Point - Keyboard shortcut: Down Arrow

MtD

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

***UPDATE***

It was determined that this is a behavior update and NOT a bug. However, i'm keeping the Report link in case some users wanted to up-vote for a feature.

It looks like this is a bug. I was able to recreate it.

However, if you right click on the timeline's work area and select "Show audio time units", the behavior seems to be corrected.

I have filed a bug report, please upvote: "go to select clip end" bug: Goes one frame before clip's end – Adobe video & audio apps

Kevin-Monahan​ Can you please help us out with that?

I agree with Meg, I have never used this shortcut before, and it is better to use "Go to Next Edit Point" Instead.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Not a bug: by design.

Behavior changed with 13.0.2.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Why though. Since "Go to select clip start" does not behave the same way?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Employee ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Christian.Z  wrote

Why though. Since "Go to select clip start" does not behave the same way?

That's because the Playhead represents an entire frame, which has a leading "edge" and a "tail." At the start of the clip, the leading edge is right on the edit. At the end of a clip, the playhead appears to be one frame short. It's not. The tail end of the playhead is touching the end of the clip (so you can mark OUT accurately this way, instead of moving back one frame and then marking out).

Zoom way in on the Playhead. The Playhead is NOT a "needle." It's represents an entire frame of film/video, so it's got that head and tail once you zoom in. That is why you never mark OUT after using the DOWN arrow. If you do, you'd be slicing off a frame of your IN point every time you do that.

Some people edit for years not knowing this small idiosyncrasy.

If I am not explaining this correctly, please let me know.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

hmmmm. Interesting ….

I think I always went back from edit point one frame to do something like keyframe for opacity or whatever ...so this sorta makes sense.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Kevin-Monahan

makes sense, a bit.

excuse me if I bother you with one more question to better understand how it works: why does it behave differently when “show audio time units” is selected, and thus moves exactly to the end of the frame and not one frame earlier?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm just guessing but even though it's only one frame the 'sound' for that frame extends to the tail of that frame... the end of the frame.

????

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

so, like in the old days, optical track on film, the sound goes to the end of that frame... right ???  so maybe that's why.

hehe...  otherwise  you would be doing something like editing that last frame sound stuff one frame early ?  who knows.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Audio units are milliseconds or samples, not frames.  So, instead of 24 marks or 30 marks per second (assuming 24p or 30i) on the Time Ruler, you have 1,000 marks if going will milliseconds or 32,000 or 48,000 if going with samples (assuming 32kHz or 48kHz). 

The blue vertical line being 1/1000th or 1/48,000th to the left is either so narrow that one can't differentiate it or so narrow that the software doesn't visibly differentiate it.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

that would be an interesting test...

Christian, using audio thing .. go to last frame of clip ( where you see it at the edit point between clips) and insert a few frames of something ( just copy paste or whatever ) … and see what happens..

??

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Edits can only be placed at a frame.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Maybe this graphic with dashed pink lines drawn over the screen grab from the original post will help.

  • The horizontal blue line that extends to the right from the Playhead (circled in pink) represents the width of the frame along the Time Ruler.
  • The blue vertical line that extends down from the Playhead is the left edge of the frame.
  • The rectangle formed by those two lines (indicated with diagonal dashed lines inside the Clip Boundary of the A clip, C0313.MP4) represents the current frame being shown in the Program tab.

PR Timeline Where the Frames Are-01.png

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I guess if in doubt you can always use left right arrow key to jump back and ahead one frame and look at program monitor to see where you're at exactly.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

hehe, how can something so simple be so complicated...

it should be noted that the 'cut' you make is actually on the needle that's not a needle....

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Actually, it’s exactly as it should be where to the left is earlier and to the right is later.

The blue vertical line shows exactly where an “add edit” action will take place.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

yep. I think that was the whole point of the poster's question. The behavior changed apparently ( as per above post). Meg dog was saying use up down arrows to go to 'next edit point' ( meaning back or forward one clip or cut or whatever ).

So in THIS CASE we are now one frame BEFORE where you would typically do something like " insert clip" or common edit things between clips.  It is now one frame BEFORE that point.

duh... maybe I don't get the question cause I'm an idiot, but the poster now knows that it is set up this way now so that you can add something like a keyframe or out point or whatever on that last frame...

Thanks for helping explain !

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I was wondering if I could compare the last frame scenario to a freshly baked bagel, where you want to slice it and share it with a friend after adding cream cheese and lox.  But it was really stupid.  " Now you have the last frame firmly in your grasp, like a fresh bagel...," etc.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

It could be renamed “Go to last frame of selected.” 

But that’s the same thing as selected clip end.

The “go to” feature is newer, the play head visual is not.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You are correct.  Please keep in mind the POSTER of this thread is asking this question....

Please answer him as succinctly as possible ...and how this behavior can be a benefit, rather than using the up down arrow keys for going to cuts and clips etc.  Thanks !

"Go to selected clip end" goes one frame before the clip end

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Warren

========

makes sense, a bit.

excuse me if I bother you with one more question to better understand how it works: why does it behave differently when “show audio time units” is selected, and thus moves exactly to the end of the frame and not one frame earlier?

==========

So if Christian has show audio units selected he can't edit anything ??

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
May 02, 2019 May 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Been a few years.. but fired up cs6 and put in a mov file ( had to download QT to do it , sheesh ) and went to audio units.. and yep, there's no frames at all indicated.. so I guess that's basically to see where you're at so you can make note about timecode and go to audition or something to work on sound stuff.

Interesting stuff..

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 03, 2019 May 03, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The main advantage of working with Show Audio Time Units enabled is creating keyframes on audio clips in the Timeline (probably for volume) at the millisecond level.

It might feel like the Playhead behaves differently when "Show Audio Time Units" is enabled, but it doesn't.  You'll want to keep an eye on whether or not your current zoom level is good for how you want to work.

For example, If you enable Show Audio Time Units and don't zoom in more, it may feel like Step Back 1 Frame (left arrow) and Step Forward 1 Frame (right arrow) don't do anything (especially if you're viewing samples and not milliseconds).  When you do zoom in, Step Back 1 Frame and Step Forward 1 Frame be obvious; however, it can feel like regular edit actions don't work like clicking and dragging the left or right edge of a Clip Boundary just one frame.  

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines