Welcome Dialog

Welcome to the Community!

We have a brand new look! Take a tour with us and explore the latest updates on Adobe Support Community.


Locked

Account Cancellation as a Contributor

New Here ,
Sep 21, 2020 Sep 21, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Good Morning
How do I cancel my account as a photographer, because I think Adobe wants photographers to edit the photos, and I'm just a photographer, I didn't think the evaluation system was very clear
Thank you

TOPICS
Contributors

Views

194

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Sep 21, 2020 Sep 21, 2020
Photographs have always been "edited" even in the times of film cameras or even with the very first cameras. This was called developing and if you did not do that, the laboratory did it for you. A lot of the tools used in Photoshop are simulating this editing. And today the situation is similar. In camera processing develops your pictures. But the decisions the camera takes are not always suitable. That's why photographers use computer programs like Lightroom and Photoshop to process the pictu...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 21, 2020 Sep 21, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Digital photography requires more than holding a camera.  A robot drone can take pictures. 

 

Instead of giving up on Stock, why not get a subscription to the Photography Plan for $10/month and see how easy improving your digital photos can be?

 

Creative Cloud Photography Plan includes the very latest versions of these great products & services:
-- Photoshop CC and Photoshop on iPad
-- Lightroom on desktop, mobile and the web
-- Lightroom Classic
-- Portfolio website + hosting (ties in with Behance, Lightroom and your Adobe Stock submissions)
-- Spark with premium features
-- Bridge
-- 20 GB cloud storage (upgradable to 1 TB).
https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/photography.html

 

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Sep 21, 2020 Sep 21, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Good afternoon
I have been a photographer for over 45 years, as I said a photographer and
not an editor, in my day I didn't have robots or drones, so it's not my
case.
After this answer, arrogant and rude and I really prefer to leave Adobe.
Be more professional.

Good luck

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 21, 2020 Sep 21, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Nobody here has been arrogant or rude to you.  NASA has been sending probes with cameras to distant planets for over 50 years.  Robot captured images are nothing new.  But they are rarely perfect without some post production work.

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 21, 2020 Sep 21, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Photographs have always been "edited" even in the times of film cameras or even with the very first cameras. This was called developing and if you did not do that, the laboratory did it for you. A lot of the tools used in Photoshop are simulating this editing.

 

And today the situation is similar. In camera processing develops your pictures. But the decisions the camera takes are not always suitable. That's why photographers use computer programs like Lightroom and Photoshop to process the pictures.

 

Stock photography requires pictures that are good for being used for a wide range of applications. That's why Stock needs neutral processing. But still, very often, some areas of a picture are to dark or too light, there is dust, or there are other disturbing elements. Also, there are some legal requirements to edit pictures, like visible logos.

 

BTW: I have probably very few pictures that get distributed without some minor adjustments. Even when I'm taking pictures of an event, I need to process the pictures to make them look best. Most of it are easy adjustments with seconds of my time spend, but some require more time.

 

This said, if you really want to cancel your contributor account, you need to contact Adobe stock contributor support: Need help? (stock contributor support) 

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Apr 17, 2021 Apr 17, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks, I want to cancel too.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Apr 17, 2021 Apr 17, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

When I started (in design back in the 80s) the photographer may have developed their own photos if they were B&W but hardly ever color. Even my pro photographer brother only processed B&W photos, color negs & slides were sent to a lab because they required special equipment to develop & print.

  Later when photoshop came in, the computer operator at the printers did the editing with instructions from a designer, not a photographer. The OP here is better off doing editorial which doesn't require much editing. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 17, 2021 Apr 17, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

quoteThe OP here is better off doing editorial which doesn't require much editing.

===========

That's not an option, unfortunately.  Individuals cannot submit image for "Editorial Use Only."  Adobe works with trusted partner agencies only.

 

Also, this discussion is several months old.  I think it's fair to say the OP is gone and will never see this.

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 17, 2021 Apr 17, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

@duns123 wrote:

When I started (in design back in the 80s) the photographer may have developed their own photos if they were B&W but hardly ever color. Even my pro photographer brother only processed B&W photos, color negs & slides were sent to a lab because they required special equipment to develop & print.


Colour processing was more difficult and unforgivig on errors, that was was the reason why many photographers decided not doing colour processing. https://emulsive.org/articles/darkroom/printing/making-colour-prints-in-the-darkroom-welcome-to-ra-4...

 

I would also suggest to look into this: https://youtu.be/_2mQsUIc97E

 


@duns123 wrote:

  Later when photoshop came in, the computer operator at the printers did the editing with instructions from a designer, not a photographer.


That's still the case. But that's not the point here. At the time you needed to scan images and the scan would be worked in Photoshop. 

 

Your simply distorting historical facts:

  • pictures did always gotten edited to show the best of the picture. This does not need to be done by the photographer. Indeed you can hire me to do the job for you.
  • Pictures got worked on also by the designers/printers. I have seen examples of my company (150years of history, so we've made it all...from glass plate to digital). In all those 150 years, we "photoshopped" our photographs quite the same way we do today with Photoshop. 

 

As I said before, even my editorial work does need dodge and burn, lens correction and sharpening. What it does not need (should not need!!!) is editing out people like in good old Russia. I, however, did even that for a familly picture, where the boyfriend of the moment was shortly after the picture take persona non grata.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer
LinkedIn Learning is the next generation of Lynda.com. Grow your skills by exploring more Photoshop courses today: https://www.linkedin.com/learning/topics/p...

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 17, 2021 Apr 17, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied


@duns123 wrote:

Thanks, I want to cancel too.


Read my answer, especially the last part.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines