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Two rejected images

Community Beginner ,
Mar 19, 2018 Mar 19, 2018

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This first one was rejected for an "Artifacts Problem." I did just a touch of sharpening on the RAW file, and not much else. Should I not do any sharpening at all on this one?

SanFrancisco-1.jpg

Second one was rejected for an exposure problem. Is it a little too dark? (Just the rock?) Looks fine to my eye, but I'm trying to get a better feel for what Adobe's looking for here.

CaboSanLucas_Mexico-8.jpg

Any input is appreciated.

Matt

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Engaged , Mar 20, 2018 Mar 20, 2018
Hy.Thanks for your request.picture 1:Please have a look at: Stock Contributor User Guide > Review process > Quality and technical issues > Artifacts"ArtifactsThe most common artifacts problem is excessive noise, which causes the image to look grainy. Artifacts are often caused by a high ISO setting for images captured in low-light situations. Get to know the limitations of your camera. Most cameras are excessively noisy at ISO 1600, and some at lower settings. Artifacts can be caused by invasive...

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Advocate ,
Mar 20, 2018 Mar 20, 2018

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Hi,

You took the pictures with an Olympus E30 at ISO 200. In general you should be very careful with the image processing, because this camera obviously has a bad noise behaviour. This is particularly noticeable with high-contrast images.

In the first picture you can see the artifacts on the window frames and I find it exposed too dark. More contrast in the image could not hurt either.

The second image is severely underexposed and has strong noise in the area of the sky. The image looks dull and could use a little more contrast/saturation. I would change the composition of the picture according to the rule of thirds so that the sea lion moves more into the focus of the viewer and the horizon moves up a bit.

You should be very selective when correcting technical image errors and further processing, as the source material is not particularly good and new image errors are created or amplified otherwise.

Greets,

v.poth

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 20, 2018 Mar 20, 2018

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When zoomed in your image shows artifacts/noise:

You can try to reduce the noise a bit, maybe use a mask as well to mask out the sky.

You also have a small halo along the building edge.

untitled.png

You can see this in the sky.

As for the second shot, yes, it is too dark, therefore underexposed. You should take note of the histogram in Lightroom/Adobe Photoshop, or any other raw editing programme, as it is too much on the left.

You need to bring the exposure up.

histogram.png

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Engaged ,
Mar 20, 2018 Mar 20, 2018

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Hy.

Thanks for your request.

picture 1:

Please have a look at: Stock Contributor User Guide > Review process > Quality and technical issues > Artifacts

"Artifacts

The most common artifacts problem is excessive noise, which causes the image to look grainy. Artifacts are often caused by a high ISO setting for images captured in low-light situations. Get to know the limitations of your camera. Most cameras are excessively noisy at ISO 1600, and some at lower settings.

Artifacts can be caused by invasive post-processing. Always save your original file. If you get a rejection based on artifacts, compare the image you submitted with the original and assess where artifacts were introduced. 

Finally, artifacts can be caused by sensor dust. The smallest speck of dust on your sensor can cause spots on your image. Sensor dust spots can be removed in post-processing, but a simpler solution is to keep your sensor clean. We recommend that you check with your local camera store for cleaning options and advice."

If you open your picture in 100% view you will see a noise. 

You can reduce/remove the noise in photoshop. >>> Photoshop User Guide > Image repair and restoration > Reduce image noise and JPEG artifacts

picture 2:

...stone on the left side is very dark:

02_01_user.jpg

...align horizon:

02_02_user.jpg

...picture noise (100%):

02_03_user.jpg

I hope you don't take my opinions personally.

Best regards,

Mario

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