I used to LOVE Dreamweaver. But now...?

Explorer ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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I once loved Dreamweaver back in the good old days. Back when Macromedia released Dreamweaver in late 1999/2000. I introduced Dreamweaver to my college campus and we abandoned Adobe Pagemill in our web design class. This was so long ago it seems like another life.

 

This was the Stone Age of modern web design, but Dreamweaver was an amazing tool that made it easy for a graphic designer like myself to layout a page. It still wasn't WYSIWYG, but it was pretty easy. You could also dive into the code and do whatever you wanted. It actually introduced me to writing code. I still remain primarily a Designer, but I can mostly do what needs to be done in code when required. I'm just a little rusty at it now.

 

Adobe acquired Macromedia and Dreamweaver was still my go to for creating any web pages for years. Even now I keep installing Dreamweaver and updating as needed always excited for those new features. I appreciated all the improvements, but I was so very excited when a Designer-focused feature was added, like the CSS Designer palette.

 

That excitement left long ago. Dreamweaver is still very capable and very solid in regards to performance. That hasn't changed. But I'm so confused why it has been left on the side of the road when it comes to WYSIWYG editing. It's almost like it has been abandoned.

 

There is a wide variety of web-based software and some you install on your machine that all offer Adobe XD style layout capabilites while generating usable code. A well-skilled developer may scoff at the term "usable code", but you have a functioning web page with your interactions and layout intact. Wrappler.io has been suggested numerous times. It looks great!

 

My problem is, it's another subscription or cost. I already have what should be the best web design software on the market. Why should I pay for another? These features should be usable in software I subscribe to already. I subscribe to Adobe Creative Cloud for a reason. Adobe is my one-stop for video, photo, web, animation, illustration, etc. and has been for literally decades now.

 

Adobe XD is fantastic for prototyping, but I have struggled exporting and translating a design from XD to HTML. I understand the concept of exporting your graphics, copying your CSS code, etc. but it seems that it should be easier to translate. Other users also suggest using WebExport, Zeplin, and other Adobe XD plugins but I have had varying levels of success. There is still an incredible amount of coding that must be done.

 

Maybe that's the point? Dreamweaver never really was a WYSIWYG editor and it's obvious that it never will be. I should brush up on my coding and just get over it. Or hire a Developer. It seems to me though that Adobe is dropping the ball here. Adobe XD is so fun, but if I can't easily translate my work from XD to somewhat usable HTML then I have wasted considerable time learning XD. Adobe Muse was awesome, but the code it generated was an abomination. No improvement to Muse, it was just discontinued due to the rise of XD.

 

I know it's not as easy as just "export it". It will take a lot of effort for Adobe to make this happen. I have just been trained to jump from one Adobe software to another with ease like I have been doing for years. I design a layout in Illustrator or Photoshop and then import it to XD to add interations. But from XD to Dreamweaver? Not a chance.

 

I apologize for the rant. I'm getting really deep into web design again with a personal project and I have run into some speedbumps. Translating that really nice layout to HMTL isn't the end of the world in regards to difficulty. It will just take time. Frustrated doing it the "hard way" when there should be an easier way. It just seems like Adobe is missing out on a market they should already have locked-in.

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LEGEND ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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I apologize for the rant. I'm getting really deep into web design again with a personal project and I have run into some speedbumps. Translating that really nice layout to HMTL isn't the end of the world in regards to difficulty. It will just take time. Frustrated doing it the "hard way" when there should be an easier way. It just seems like Adobe is missing out on a market they should already have locked-in.


By @JoshuaLeeClark

 

The party is unfortunately over for Dreamweaver. For your information, if you don't already know, its now only minimally maintained so don't expect any new features or major updates anytime soon. DW was never really a WYSIWYG editor - it attempted to show your page how it was meant to look but the more complex your code became the more it failed. I dont think its improved much over time, a lot has been left to rot down over the years.  Adobe, although its not official stopped competing in the web-editor arena as more and more players, both stand-alone and online editors appeared, which diluted their slice of the cake and revenue. To them its probably no longer financially viable to maintain and progress beyond a few minor updates when and if they feel like it. Take the example of Bootstrap 5 (responsive toolkit), now nearly a year old and no support for it beyond manually coding in DW, whilst other editors were ready to implement support shortly after its official release.

 

The editor is WAPPLER not W'R'APPLER. That is more suited to probably the likes of yourself having a more visual, designer orientated background or those that have passed their 'sell by date' in web development but professional coders most likely would avoid it as it uses some niche workflows, which most likely wouldnt sit well with them or their ethos. In my opinion its target market is those that have a limited requirement to delve into the web/app development at times. If anyone buys into it thinking they can get a development job or career, beyond what they can source themselves, they are sadly mistaken. It serves a purpose. Yes its subscription based, but so is Dreamweaver now, Wappler to its credit if you buy into the pro version does provide 'bang for buck' if you intend to use it frequently and of course you can subscribe for a few months and then cancel once your project is finished. I think you would be well advised to investigate it, although it pains me to say so (as a pure coder) because of your background. I would not be advising anyone who is thinking about a long-term serious career in web-devlopment though, its a dead end street, in my opinion.

 

There's plenty of freely available editors out there such a VS Code, Sublime Text, Codelobster, Atom etc but they dont have a WYSIWYG enviroment, you need to be adapt at coding. Other possiblilities are Wordpress, still going from strength to strengh. I avoided it like the plague throughout my career but in hindsight I wished now I had given it more time as we are in an era where skill and knowledge count for very little and you need very little skill and knowledge to use Wordpress. It was the forerunner to the batch of point, shoot and forget low-code, no-code tools which are now available and are infused into the arena of low budget clients. 

 

Whatever, you can either stick with DW and run with it. Its still a good basic editor, but mostly these days for coders, just dont expect any future progression or you can investigate solutions which are still actively being developed and have a future.

 

 

 

 

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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Preaching to the fairly small choir of DW hold outs I'm afraid.

DW is now only minimally maintained. It no longer receives bug fixes or new features. Just OS updares, security patches, and updates to third-party dependencies.

I'd be willing to bet if it weren't part of the full CC subscription, the userbase would be so small that Adobe would just EOL it and be done with it all together. 

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New Here ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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If you're interested in the Front End, I think you should take a look at pinegrow. Its price is very very affordable, and in my opinion it is much better than dreamweaver or wappler for this task.
Another issue is the backend, personally I don't like cms like wordpress and I prefer a custom administrator.
For this task you have either wappler, or dreamweaver in its beta version with php 7 support, or dreamweaver + webassist extensions. (very good extensions in my opinion)

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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Writing is on the wall for Dreamweaver I'm afraid .... Just releases for compatibility with the latest OS updates and dependencies is all it is getting. Next step is likely to be an official EOL announcement at some point in the future. It's been a slow death for years, well I say death, more like destruction! .....

Paul-M, ACP

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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I use multiple tools for web development.  DW is not the only tool I use nor should it be your only tool. 

 

CODE EDITORS:
-- Atom (free) - https://atom.io/
-- Codespaces (free, browser-based) - https://github.com/features/codespaces
-- Nova (Mac only, formerly called Coda) - https://nova.app/
-- Pinegrow - https://pinegrow.com/
-- Sublime Text - http://www.sublimetext.com/
-- Visual Studio Code (free) - https://code.visualstudio.com/
-- Wappler ~ Visual Web App Builder - https://wappler.io/

 

Adobe puts their main resources into design apps, not stand alone web authoring tools.  Look at how many people work on PS, AI, Substance 3D  compared to DW.   Adobe lost interest in web authoring as evidenced by the EOL of  GoLive, Muse, Flash/Shockwave, and countless others.  Trends change. Businesses must adapt to what they feel the majority of their users want.

 

For non-coders who want a web presence, Adobe offers 3 options:
-- Adobe Behance (free) - https://help.behance.net/hc/en-us/articles/204483894-Guide-Intro-to-Behance
-- Adobe Portfolio (free with a paid Creative Cloud Plan) - https://portfolio.adobe.com/

-- Creative Cloud Express (formerly called Spark)- https://www.adobe.com/express/

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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LEGEND ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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quote

 

 

Adobe puts their main resources into design apps, not stand alone web authoring tools.  Look at how many people work on PS, AI, Substance 3D  compared to DW.   Adobe lost interest in web authoring as evidenced by the EOL of  GoLive, Muse, Flash/Shockwave, and countless others.\

 


By @Nancy OShea

 

Fireworks being another high profile victim of Adobe which was EOLed before it should have been, in my opinion. Adobe seem to eventually generally trash a lot of what they buy into. They have a very poor track record when it comes to competing with smaller innovative teams but have a very good track record of offering financial temptations that cant be refused, showing themselves to be a very 'ugly' company, who take no interest in their users, like most monoliths in my opinion.

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Explorer ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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You're right. Dreamweaver shouldn't be my only web development tool in the modern age. It's just a shame that Adobe has let this segment of the market slip. But like you said, it's all based on where the market is and where there's money to be made.

Adobe Behance, Portfolio, and Creative Cloud Express are all great, but by simplifying the creation process, they put you in a box that is difficult to escape. Templates are a wonderful thing, but if you can't fit your square graphics into their round hole, you can't customize things much at all to make things work. I actually use Creative Cloud Express quite often in my advertising work. Sometimes you need some inspiration or you find that good starting point that you can flesh out into something greater.

I have no choice but to really work on my coding skills to to actually give Wrappler a try. Thank you very much for your links and suggestions!

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