CPU Usage on 100% During Export

Community Beginner ,
Mar 31, 2019 Mar 31, 2019

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When exporting my RAW images to JPEGs to send to clients Lightroom uses up all of the available CPU power which makes the mouse stutter and makes it very hard to do any other task whilst the export is occuring.

This is not a new problem. It has been happening for quite a while now since version 6 or 7, I can't remember exactly but I do know this wasn't a problem with older versions of Lightroom before the Adobe Subscription service.

I've tried enabling/disabling GPU utilization and that made no difference.

I own an Intel i7 3.4GHz CPU so lack of power isn't the problem.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 31, 2019 Mar 31, 2019

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Make sure Sync, Address Lookup, and Face Detection are all paused as shown below.

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LEGEND ,
Mar 31, 2019 Mar 31, 2019

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AzzBlock  wrote

When exporting my RAW images to JPEGs to send to clients Lightroom uses up all of the available CPU power which makes the mouse stutter and makes it very hard to do any other task whilst the export is occuring.

This is not a new problem. It has been happening for quite a while now since version 6 or 7, I can't remember exactly but I do know this wasn't a problem with older versions of Lightroom before the Adobe Subscription service.

I've tried enabling/disabling GPU utilization and that made no difference.

I think this is expected behavior by Lightroom. Exporting is a very CPU intensive task, and it will use up most of the CPU power. They did change the behavior a few versions ago (I don't remember when) to make more use of the CPU, causing some CPUs to hit 100% on long exports.

I own an Intel i7 3.4GHz CPU so lack of power isn't the problem.


You can say this all you want, but the evidence is clear: your CPU is at its capacity on this task.

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LEGEND ,
Mar 31, 2019 Mar 31, 2019

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To build on dj_paige's reply, Adobe Official Rep Rikk Flohr said a couple months ago:

This behavior is expected. Changes were made in a previous version to more aggressively use CPU cores during the Export operation. Export takes priority over local operations to facilitate much faster exports.

In years past, people complained that LR exports took too long and weren't using all of their CPU's processors. So Adobe changed LR to use all your CPU (no matter how fast or slow it is) to get the export done as fast as possible.

A number of people have complained about this. I suggest you post a feature request on the official Adobe feedback forum, where Adobe wants all product feedback: Lightroom Classic CC | Photoshop Family Customer Community . Adobe product developers read everything posted there but rarely participate in this forum.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 01, 2019 Apr 01, 2019

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Thanks. I actually searched for Adobe technical support which lead to this community forum meaning they obviously don't have any. I will try the feature request as you suggest.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 01, 2019 Apr 01, 2019

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This behaviour in my opinion needs to change even if it results in a slightly slower export or at least have the option to limit CPU usage.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 01, 2019 Apr 01, 2019

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If you are willing to let the export process take longer, you can use your OS tools (Windows Task Manager or the Mac equivalent) to lower the process priority of LR before you start the export. This will smooth out the system throughput.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 01, 2019 Apr 01, 2019

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Thanks but I tried that and it makes no difference.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 01, 2019 Apr 01, 2019

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Can you describe "makes no difference"?

During the export processing, LR is going to pretty much max out your CPU. The question is how well it plays with the other processes.

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New Here ,
Jun 20, 2020 Jun 20, 2020

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No fix? I do have a i9 9750h and experiencing this myself. CPU stays at 100% usage the whole export time(95 Degrees Celsius) and cursor it's choppy. Audio on spotify also. Pls help

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LEGEND ,
Jun 20, 2020 Jun 20, 2020

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As stated above, this is the expected behavior of Lightroom exports, and from that point of view, since this is expected, there is nothing to fix. Since you have a very fast CPU, it will get through the exporting process faster than people who don't have such a fast CPU. Any change to make the CPU not use 100% would slow down the export time, but it would probably also improve the Spotify problem. Take your choice, and provide feedback to Adobe as instructed above.

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Community Beginner ,
Jun 09, 2022 Jun 09, 2022

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How is this not something to be fixed? High CPU temps for long periods of time are detrimental do the longevity of the hardware.There should be an option to limit CPU usage.

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LEGEND ,
Jun 09, 2022 Jun 09, 2022

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Running a CPU at high utilization for long periods of time won't hurt it. Modern CPUs have temperature sensors and will throttle back the clock frequency if the chip truly overheats to a dangerous level, and if that fails, the CPU will simply shut down.

 

But I agree that LR should provide users with an option that ensures they can use LR interactively or do other things on their computer during a long-running export. For most installations, LR uses about 80-90% of total CPU during an export and remains reasonably responsive. But for a significant minority of users, it uses close to 100% and makes the computer otherwise unusable.

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Community Beginner ,
Jun 14, 2022 Jun 14, 2022

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That is absolutely incorrect. I have an i7 10th gen it still gets to 85~90 ºC at 100% usage. Not one singles person who knows hardware would argue against the fact that this temperature is detrimental to the CPU. My computer is still very much usable even when exporting in these conditions, but I would definitely opt for waiting 10 more minutes if it meant not sacrificing my CPU in the export process..

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LEGEND ,
Jun 14, 2022 Jun 14, 2022

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"I have an i7 10th gen it still gets to 85~90 ºC at 100% usage. Not one singles person who knows hardware would argue against the fact that this temperature is detrimental to the CPU."

 

Do you have an authoritative technical reference (not a folkloric reddit thread)?

 

Intel designs its processors to avoid overheating and damaging the processor by automatically throttling the clock frequency or shutting down.  Most of Intel's processors have a Tjunction max of 100°C, and the processors will run at full clock frequency for extended periods of time as long as the Tjunction is less than 100.  Do you think Intel deliberately set Tjunction max too high to shorten the lifetimes of its processors and juice their sales?  And that AMD would not make competitive hay about that? (Or vice versa.)

 

See this article for Intel's explanation:

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000005597/processors.html

 

Note these paragraphs:

 

"Could my processor get damaged from overheating?

"It's unlikely that a processor would get damaged from overheating, due to the operational safeguards in place. Processors have two modes of thermal protection, throttling and automatic shutdown. When a core exceeds the set throttle temperature, it will reduce power to maintain a safe temperature level. The throttle temperature can vary by processor and BIOS settings. If the processor is unable to maintain a safe operating temperature through throttling actions, it will automatically shut down to prevent permanent damage."

 

"Is it bad if my processor frequently approaches or reaches its maximum temperature?

 

"Not necessarily. Many Intel® processors make use of Intel® Turbo Boost Technology, which allows them to operate at very high frequency for a short amount of time. When the processor is operating at or near its maximum frequency it's possible for the temperature to climb very rapidly and quickly reach its maximum temperature. In sustained workloads, it's possible the processor will operate at or near its maximum temperature limit. Being at maximum temperature while running a workload isn't necessarily cause for concern. Intel processors constantly monitor their temperature and can very rapidly adjust their frequency and power consumption to prevent overheating and damage." [Emphasis added]

 

 

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Community Beginner ,
Jun 29, 2022 Jun 29, 2022

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Can you even grasp the concept of service life? Of course the Tjunction temperature Intel or other manufacturers would publish is somewhat high. Of course they promise safeguards and that it won't be detrimental in the long run. But they also don't intend your hardware to last more than 5 years... Having my own temperature buffer so I can make sure my CPU runs for as long as intend for it to last is a precaution! You might be fortunate enough to live in a country where replacing a CPU every few years is not a worry, unfortunately for me that is not the case.

On a more technical aspect, as you required, higher CPU temps increase electrical resistence, decreasing efficiency, it speeds up degradation of electrical pathways within components that can lead to errors and can even cause low temperature solder to melt. All these issues do happen. There is not one single place I've researched that didn't find temperatures higher than 90ºC to be detrimental to the service life of the CPU, and that you should try to cool it down if that ever happens - in fact it's absurdly naive to think that wouldn't be the case.

Copying and pasting a manufacturer's web page as source for such an issue is hardly an "authoritative technical reference" and can be better categorized as insane naivety. Furthermore, my argument is that this should be a choice provided by Adobe, so misinformed folks such as yourself could degrade their hardware as they please but more cautious people could try and mitigate the damage that 93~95ºC at 100% load on their CPU for 30min 4 times a week during export would cause..

In conclusion, if you're not gonna positively contribute to a discussion, just refrain from making a comment. Thank you

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LEGEND ,
Jun 30, 2022 Jun 30, 2022

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So you can't provide an authoritative reference. And you think Intel, AMD, and Apple knowingly set their maximum temperatures too high, which shortens the life of their hardware, while the class-action lawyers look the other way.   

 

It's important that readers here get help in distinguishing folklore from fact.

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Community Beginner ,
Jul 01, 2022 Jul 01, 2022

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You seem to be painfully unaware of planned obsolescence as a common practice. I wish I lived in this colorful little rainbow world you live in.

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LEGEND ,
Jul 02, 2022 Jul 02, 2022

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"You seem to be painfully unaware of planned obsolescence as a common practice."

 

If it were even mildly plausible that Intel, Apple, and AMD were deceiving customers about the effect of their maximum temperatures for the last decade, the class-action sharks would have smelled the blood. Just look at the $500M settlement for Apple's iOS battery performance, the two actions about the iPhone antennas,  the actions about alleged Intel security defects, etc. etc. etc.

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Community Beginner ,
Jul 04, 2022 Jul 04, 2022

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LATEST

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LEGEND ,
Jun 09, 2022 Jun 09, 2022

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quote

How is this not something to be fixed? High CPU temps for long periods of time are detrimental do the longevity of the hardware.There should be an option to limit CPU usage.


By @gabrielb26338486

 

It is behaving as Adobe designed it, so from their point of view, there's nothing to fix. Just because you don't like this, that doesn't mean that its broken and needs to be fixed. In one of the other posts in this thread, there is a link where you can ask Adobe to add in the option to limit CPU usage. I suggest you do that.

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Community Beginner ,
Jun 14, 2022 Jun 14, 2022

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It's not a question of  "me" not liking it. Look it up, it's been a common complaint amongst users and definitely something that should be an option to the user. Just because it was intended doesn't mean it wasn't bad design, and bad designs are definitely something that should be fixed.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 14, 2022 Jun 14, 2022

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Have you tried using today’s Lightroom Classic 11.4 update? One of the new features is GPU acceleration for export. I just got done running some tests, and because the GPU now takes on a significant amount of the export load, CPU usage is down, so temperatures and fan noise also went down…and the export of over 600 images finished about one-third faster than in Lightroom Classic 11.3.1.

 

Do you find that Lightroom Classic 11.4 export GPU acceleration frees up the CPU on your system as well?

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Community Beginner ,
Jul 01, 2022 Jul 01, 2022

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That did work! It didn't speed up the process however it did take a load off the CPU. Before a constant 100% now load sits at an 70% average avoiding the 85+ºC temps. Thank you!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 01, 2022 Jul 01, 2022

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@gabrielb26338486 wrote:

That did work! It didn't speed up the process however it did take a load off the CPU. Before a constant 100% now load sits at an 70% average avoiding the 85+ºC temps. Thank you!


 

Then this seems to be the solution Adobe decided to work on: Instead of adding a CPU usage tweak (which I’ve seen in other applications but is frankly, very rare), they chose to look at the computer as a whole and use available resources in a comprehensive way, like making better use of today’s more powerful GPUs. A CPU limiter would have slowed performance; instead, the solution of handing the load to the GPU simultaneously drops the CPU power/heat load and should export more quickly…win/win.

 

This is a better solution, but it took a while for Lightroom Classic to get there…video and 3D applications currently use the GPU much more heavily throughout the application than Lightroom Classic and Photoshop do. So this is a good change, but now we have to hope that they are going to continue to add GPU acceleration to other areas that are still too CPU-based and heat up the computer, such as rendering previews and thumbnails, face recognition, etc.

 

This is not necessarily a solution if a computer has weak graphics or low VRAM, because then export GPU acceleration will not be able to have much impact and the CPU will continue to max out. But chances are most users who are hammering Lightroom Classic already have graphics hardware that meets the updated requirements that allow export GPU acceleration.

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