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Daltonism

New Here ,
Jan 15, 2023 Jan 15, 2023

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Hello everyone. I have an unusual and very annoying problem. I'm color blind. I confuse red with green and I have a big problem with shades in general. I wanted to know if there is any proven way to properly set colors in lightroom so that they look correct and natural. Maybe someone has a similar problem, or knows someone who deals with photography being colorblind. Thanks for any replies.

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Community Expert ,
Jan 15, 2023 Jan 15, 2023

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I do remember that Joel Grimes is colorblind. 

 

He talks about it here:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xHUR09U8lcM


Sean McCormack. Author. Magazine Writer. Former Official Fuji X-Photographer.

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New Here ,
Jan 15, 2023 Jan 15, 2023

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Thanks for the answer. Joel says in this video that he can't just see the color green. Unfortunately, I have a bigger flaw. I am confused by reds, oranges, greens, and all their shades. Thanks again for your reply.

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Community Expert ,
Jan 15, 2023 Jan 15, 2023

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I think the technique of boosting the various colors to see where they are is still a valid approach. 


Sean McCormack. Author. Magazine Writer. Former Official Fuji X-Photographer.

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Community Expert ,
Jan 15, 2023 Jan 15, 2023

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I can see your future as a great monchrome photographer!

My thoughts-

As in the Youtube link- Joel talks about 'Saturation'.

You could also use HSL 'Luminance' to judge 'brightness' of the color channels.

The Histogram in the Develop module shows RGB Color channel percentages for the tones under the cursor, which might be helpful.

2023-01-16 12_26_36-Roberts Catalog-v12 - Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Classic - Develop.jpg

For Monochrome images- choose a B&W profile, then use the B&W panel to change the 'luminance' -'tones' of each color to alter contrasts.

2023-01-16 12_28_06-Roberts Catalog-v12 - Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Classic - Library.jpg

 

Regards. My System: Lr-Classic 12.1 Photoshop 24.0.1, ACR 15.1, Lightroom 6.1, Lr-iOS 8.0.8, Bridge 13.0.1, Windows-11.

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Community Expert ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

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quote

…if there is any proven way to properly set colors in lightroom so that they look correct and natural…

By @Łukasz27948058ggwm

 

The first thing to try in the Develop module is Settings > Auto White Balance or its keyboard shortcut. That applies AI-powered color balancing, which works pretty well. For many images, it might be all you need to do to get natural color balance.

 

Back in the days before accurate color monitors, old prepress pros learned what color values certain objects should be. For example, they knew the proportions of CMYK values that various skin tones have. Some bragged that because of that knowledge they could color-correct on a black-and-white monitor (which early Macs had), as long as they could see a color value readout.

 

So that's one thing to try…understand the typical RGB values for what photographers call “memory colors” — the colors we associate with specific things. The obvious one would be anything that is supposed to be neutral gray should have equal proportions of red, green, and blue. Then learn the RGB value for things like trees and blue sky. Then, as you move the pointer around a photo, check the RGB (or Lab) values shown under the histogram in Lightroom Classic.

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Community Expert ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

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Here’s another idea: Get a pocket color chart such as the sturdy plastic ColorChecker shown in the photo below. Common colors are in specific places on the chart, so you can always know what color each square is. When you want to take a picture, take one frame with the color chart in it. When you look at the photo later in Lightroom Classic, the color chart is a reference for the various colors in the scene. If you are not sure of an object’s color in the scene, see which chart square is most similar. For example, with the chart you can know which object is red and which is green, and that the background is supposed to be a warm wood color, not white or gray.

 

And if you click the White Balance tool in a gray square in the chart, Lightroom Classic will correct the photo to neutral color. Then you can copy those corrections to all other photos of the same scene.

 

20230116-170253-_DSC7195.jpg

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