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Lightroom Classic CC 7.2 still slow with high resolution

Community Beginner ,
Feb 13, 2018

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Are there any plans on making Lightroom work fast with higher resolution screens as well? I run it on a lower res monitor just for the speed but on my 4k display at full screen the software is painfully slow. When I make LR window smaller on the same monitor then it speeds up again.

I have 2 fast m.2 hard drives (C: and D:) and decent computer so it should be able to handle it in full screen.

Lightroom Classic version: 7.2 [ 1156743 ]

License: Creative Cloud

Language setting: en

Operating system: Windows 10 - Business Edition

Version: 10.0.16299

Application architecture: x64

System architecture: x64

Logical processor count: 8

Processor speed: 4,0 GHz

Built-in memory: 63080,0 MB

Real memory available to Lightroom: 63080,0 MB

Real memory used by Lightroom: 11926,7 MB (18,9%)

Virtual memory used by Lightroom: 13962,6 MB

GDI objects count: 896

USER objects count: 2909

Process handles count: 2510

Memory cache size: 9036,1MB

Internal Camera Raw revision: 894

Maximum thread count used by Camera Raw: 5

Camera Raw SIMD optimization: SSE2,AVX,AVX2

Camera Raw virtual memory: 4636MB / 31540MB (14%)

Camera Raw real memory: 4820MB / 63080MB (7%)

System DPI setting: 144 DPI

Desktop composition enabled: Yes

Displays: 1) 3840x2160, 2) 2560x1440

Input types: Multitouch: No, Integrated touch: No, Integrated pen: Yes, External touch: No, External pen: Yes, Keyboard: No

Graphics Processor Info:

DirectX: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (23.21.13.8813)

Application folder: C:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Lightroom Classic CC

Library Path: D:\Lightroom Catalog-2.lrcat

Settings Folder: C:\Users\FotoSander\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Lightroom

SanderTaats  wrote

It is more demanding to show larger files but the difference in speed is too large between working with a 8 MP image (4k monitor) vs a 2 MP image on a smaller display. The original raw file is the same 50 MP.

None of this is surprising. The larger the image size and the larger the screen size (in pixels) means that the computer has to work harder (it takes longer) to generate the image. In the past, people could claim that the problem was that Lightroom code was poorly written, but the new release of Lightroom takes most of that reason away, and the other possible cause of slowness is hardware that can't keep up. Your 8 Megapixel display and 50 MP images certainly will take huge amounts of processing power to produce reasonable speed as judged by the user, and the evidence indicates that your computer doesn't have that much power.

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Lightroom Classic CC 7.2 still slow with high resolution

Community Beginner ,
Feb 13, 2018

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Are there any plans on making Lightroom work fast with higher resolution screens as well? I run it on a lower res monitor just for the speed but on my 4k display at full screen the software is painfully slow. When I make LR window smaller on the same monitor then it speeds up again.

I have 2 fast m.2 hard drives (C: and D:) and decent computer so it should be able to handle it in full screen.

Lightroom Classic version: 7.2 [ 1156743 ]

License: Creative Cloud

Language setting: en

Operating system: Windows 10 - Business Edition

Version: 10.0.16299

Application architecture: x64

System architecture: x64

Logical processor count: 8

Processor speed: 4,0 GHz

Built-in memory: 63080,0 MB

Real memory available to Lightroom: 63080,0 MB

Real memory used by Lightroom: 11926,7 MB (18,9%)

Virtual memory used by Lightroom: 13962,6 MB

GDI objects count: 896

USER objects count: 2909

Process handles count: 2510

Memory cache size: 9036,1MB

Internal Camera Raw revision: 894

Maximum thread count used by Camera Raw: 5

Camera Raw SIMD optimization: SSE2,AVX,AVX2

Camera Raw virtual memory: 4636MB / 31540MB (14%)

Camera Raw real memory: 4820MB / 63080MB (7%)

System DPI setting: 144 DPI

Desktop composition enabled: Yes

Displays: 1) 3840x2160, 2) 2560x1440

Input types: Multitouch: No, Integrated touch: No, Integrated pen: Yes, External touch: No, External pen: Yes, Keyboard: No

Graphics Processor Info:

DirectX: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (23.21.13.8813)

Application folder: C:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Lightroom Classic CC

Library Path: D:\Lightroom Catalog-2.lrcat

Settings Folder: C:\Users\FotoSander\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Lightroom

SanderTaats  wrote

It is more demanding to show larger files but the difference in speed is too large between working with a 8 MP image (4k monitor) vs a 2 MP image on a smaller display. The original raw file is the same 50 MP.

None of this is surprising. The larger the image size and the larger the screen size (in pixels) means that the computer has to work harder (it takes longer) to generate the image. In the past, people could claim that the problem was that Lightroom code was poorly written, but the new release of Lightroom takes most of that reason away, and the other possible cause of slowness is hardware that can't keep up. Your 8 Megapixel display and 50 MP images certainly will take huge amounts of processing power to produce reasonable speed as judged by the user, and the evidence indicates that your computer doesn't have that much power.

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Feb 13, 2018 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 13, 2018

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Do you have activate the GPU support?

Adobe Lightroom GPU Troubleshooting and FAQ

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Feb 13, 2018 0
Community Beginner ,
Feb 13, 2018

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Yes, it's activated and camera raw cache size is 25 GB. Also using smart previews.

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Feb 13, 2018 0
LEGEND ,
Feb 13, 2018

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SanderTaats  wrote

Are there any plans on making Lightroom work fast with higher resolution screens as well? I run it on a lower res monitor just for the speed but on my 4k display at full screen the software is painfully slow. When I make LR window smaller on the same monitor then it speeds up again.

I have 2 fast m.2 hard drives (C: and D:) and decent computer so it should be able to handle it in full screen.

Slow at what? Be specific. The announcement about LR 7.2 doesn't say anything about speeding up the Develop Module, it says:

Experience faster Lightroom Classic performance on machines with 12 GB of RAM or more, when you import and export photos, move between photos in Loupe view, or create HDR images and panoramas.

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Feb 13, 2018 1
Community Beginner ,
Feb 13, 2018

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Don't get me wrong, this latest version is a lot faster at the things mentioned but it's still slow. I ran some more tests and the software gets faster at everyting when you make the lightroom window smaller but if it's too small then you can't see what you are working with. It is more demanding to show larger files but the difference in speed is too large between working with a 8 MP image (4k monitor) vs a 2 MP image on a smaller display. The original raw file is the same 50 MP.

For this test I used only moving between photos in library view but the experience when working in develop mode is the same, it speeds up when the image is shown in a smaller window.

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Feb 13, 2018 0
Community Beginner ,
Feb 13, 2018

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I tried viewing large resolution images with the default photo viewer in Windows 10 and it didn't matter if I was viewing them in full 4k screen or in a small window. It was equally fast with all sizes. It feels like if only that algorithm was rewritten then the whole software would feel faster in all resolutions.

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Feb 13, 2018 0
LEGEND ,
Feb 13, 2018

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SanderTaats  wrote

It is more demanding to show larger files but the difference in speed is too large between working with a 8 MP image (4k monitor) vs a 2 MP image on a smaller display. The original raw file is the same 50 MP.

None of this is surprising. The larger the image size and the larger the screen size (in pixels) means that the computer has to work harder (it takes longer) to generate the image. In the past, people could claim that the problem was that Lightroom code was poorly written, but the new release of Lightroom takes most of that reason away, and the other possible cause of slowness is hardware that can't keep up. Your 8 Megapixel display and 50 MP images certainly will take huge amounts of processing power to produce reasonable speed as judged by the user, and the evidence indicates that your computer doesn't have that much power.

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Feb 13, 2018 1
Community Beginner ,
Feb 13, 2018

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How come there are other softwares that do the same thing a lot faster then? I like the Lightroom / Photoshop workflow except for the lack of speed. It's still poorly written code somewhere that is holding rest of the code back.

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Feb 13, 2018 0
LEGEND ,
Feb 13, 2018

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Because other applications are coded differently, even Photoshop would be faster than Lightroom. It's a tradeoff, to get certain benefits, you have to give up speed in some places.

It's still poorly written code somewhere that is holding rest of the code back.

And it's hardware that isn't up to the task of 50MP images on an 8K monitor.

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Feb 13, 2018 0
Explorer ,
Feb 28, 2018

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The latest release of Lightroom Classic CC release 7.2 is much slower for me as well. and I'm running a brand new Dell Mobile Workstation Precision 7720 (purchased one month ago) with 64 GB RAM and a 16GB NVIDIA P5000 graphics card, and "Use Graphics Processor" activated.

1. Opening a photo from Lightroom to Photoshop for editing (right-click > edit in Photoshop) takes 2 minutes or more to open in PS. Before upgrading to release 7.2, this was almost instaneous.

2. Once I finish editing the photo in Photoshop, and save it back to Lightroom, the edited image never appears in the folder in Library module. So I try clicking off the folder, and then back onto the folder again, and I get a message that says "loading", but it never reloads the images in the folder, or any other folder for that matter. Eventually I have to shut down Lightroom and restart it to get the folder to load, and voila, the edited image is now in the folder.

All of this was taking too much time, so I had to downgrade back to Lightroom Classic CC release 7.1. The following is my system info before downgrading:

Lightroom Classic version: 7.2 [ 1156743 ]

License: Creative Cloud

Language setting: en

Operating system: Windows 10

Version: 10.0.16299

Application architecture: x64

System architecture: x64

Logical processor count: 8

Processor speed: 3.0 GHz

Built-in memory: 65385.5 MB

Real memory available to Lightroom: 65385.5 MB

Real memory used by Lightroom: 4174.9 MB (6.3%)

Virtual memory used by Lightroom: 4716.9 MB

GDI objects count: 878

USER objects count: 2907

Process handles count: 2048

Memory cache size: 213.2MB

Internal Camera Raw revision: 894

Maximum thread count used by Camera Raw: 5

Camera Raw SIMD optimization: SSE2,AVX,AVX2

Camera Raw virtual memory: 1092MB / 32692MB (3%)

Camera Raw real memory: 1094MB / 65385MB (1%)

System DPI setting: 96 DPI

Desktop composition enabled: Yes

Displays: 1) 1920x1080, 2) 1920x1080, 3) 1920x1080

Input types: Multitouch: No, Integrated touch: No, Integrated pen: No, External touch: No, External pen: No, Keyboard: No

Graphics Processor Info:

DirectX: NVIDIA Quadro P5000 (22.21.13.8266)

If anyone has any revelations as to how to improve performance with release 7.2 of Lightroom Classic CC, I'd love to hear it. Otherwise, I'll stick with release 7.1.

Thanks...

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Feb 28, 2018 0
Explorer ,
Feb 28, 2018

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The latest release of Lightroom Classic CC release 7.2 is much slower for me as well. and I'm running a brand new Dell Mobile Workstation Precision 7720 (purchased one month ago) with 64 GB RAM and a 16GB NVIDIA P5000 graphics card, and "Use Graphics Processor" activated.

1. Opening a photo from Lightroom to Photoshop for editing (right-click > edit in Photoshop) takes 2 minutes or more to open in PS. Before upgrading to release 7.2, this was almost instaneous.

2. Once I finish editing the photo in Photoshop, and save it back to Lightroom, the edited image never appears in the folder in Library module. So I try clicking off the folder, and then back onto the folder again, and I get a message that says "loading", but it never reloads the images in the folder, or any other folder for that matter. Eventually I have to shut down Lightroom and restart it to get the folder to load, and voila, the edited image is now in the folder.

All of this was taking too much time, so I had to downgrade back to Lightroom Classic CC release 7.1. The following is my system info before downgrading:

Lightroom Classic version: 7.2 [ 1156743 ]

License: Creative Cloud

Language setting: en

Operating system: Windows 10

Version: 10.0.16299

Application architecture: x64

System architecture: x64

Logical processor count: 8

Processor speed: 3.0 GHz

Built-in memory: 65385.5 MB

Real memory available to Lightroom: 65385.5 MB

Real memory used by Lightroom: 4174.9 MB (6.3%)

Virtual memory used by Lightroom: 4716.9 MB

GDI objects count: 878

USER objects count: 2907

Process handles count: 2048

Memory cache size: 213.2MB

Internal Camera Raw revision: 894

Maximum thread count used by Camera Raw: 5

Camera Raw SIMD optimization: SSE2,AVX,AVX2

Camera Raw virtual memory: 1092MB / 32692MB (3%)

Camera Raw real memory: 1094MB / 65385MB (1%)

System DPI setting: 96 DPI

Desktop composition enabled: Yes

Displays: 1) 1920x1080, 2) 1920x1080, 3) 1920x1080

Input types: Multitouch: No, Integrated touch: No, Integrated pen: No, External touch: No, External pen: No, Keyboard: No

Graphics Processor Info:

DirectX: NVIDIA Quadro P5000 (22.21.13.8266)

If anyone has any revelations as to how to improve performance with release 7.2 of Lightroom Classic CC, I'd love to hear it. Otherwise, I'll stick with release 7.1.

Thanks...

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Feb 28, 2018 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 28, 2018

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Feb 28, 2018 0
paulunde LATEST
Community Beginner ,
Mar 06, 2018

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After reading the so-called solutions the performance of Lightroom Classic is HORRIBLE! Thumbnail images do not update as more images (eventually) are imported into Lightroom. Importing takes far too long to be productive. I just admit I am surprised. This experience reminds me of when Apple started screwing up their applications. I guess Adobe is now following along the same path. If it continues, I will look elsewhere for an application with speed a performance. Maybe On1 or perhaps EyeCandy's Exposure. This ain't going to work. I shoot thousands of photos a night doing concert photography. Adobe FIX THIS!

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Mar 06, 2018 0