Welcome Dialog

Welcome to the Community!

We have a brand new look! Take a tour with us and explore the latest updates on Adobe Support Community.


Problem adding images without taking up whole background

New Here ,
Jul 19, 2021 Jul 19, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

What is a good way to drag images from the photobin into a blank canvas without the image taking up the whole background/layer? I tried resizing the image beforehand but inserting the image into the blank canva causes the iamge to take up the same size? The goal of my prpoject is to drag and drop several smaller resized images into a larger canvas size.

TOPICS
How to

Views

52

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Jul 19, 2021 Jul 19, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Be like Nike.... Just do it.  Make your canvas and  start dragging. Resize them once they are on the canvas.

When you drag an image from the photobin onto the canvas, it becomes a smart object.  Wwhat that means is that all the info about the picture is still there, regarless of how small you make it.  Smart objects are a good thing, with one bit of caution: You have to often simplify that layer it's on to apply many effects, and filters.


2021-07-19_152645.jpg


Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Jul 19, 2021 Jul 19, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

@Backinthegrind12, Your blank background canvas is too small or too low of a resolution. Make your blank canvas larger and higher resolution. The blank canvas needs to be larger than the photos you want to drag into it. After you drag and drop a photo from the bin onto the blank canvas you can resize it and move it around. When you've placed all the photos onto the blank, the whole thing can be resized as needed.

 

If you have a blank canvas that is 1600 px X 1000 px and you drag a photo that is 1920 px X 1200 px onto the smaller blank canvas, of course it's going to fill up your blank. But, you can click on one of the "handles" on a corner and drag it smaller to suit.

 

Walter in Davie, FL

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Jul 20, 2021 Jul 20, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

Good point about the canvas size.  I tend to use a preset I made that's 2500 x 2500 / 300ppi.  Most of the photos  I take with my wifes fancy camera are easilly double that size.  I just made a preset canvas  that is 6000 x 6000 just for that purpose- dragging those big photos onto a canvas. 2021-07-20_040811.jpg

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 19, 2021 Jul 19, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

A third way to understand 'dragging from photobin'.

The idea is to make the most common task for compositing images on your canvas much easier and above all 'flexible = non destructive'. That's why the process uses 'smart layers'.

You have defined your canvas, size and resolution.

You have a number of files to 'drag' on that canvas. Some will be smaller than the whole canvas, beware of the resolution. You might have to upsize them, losing quality. Others (most in my case) are already much bigger in pixels than the resulting canvas.

So 'getting' one of those files on the canvas absolutely requires resizing the dragged image, moving it, possibly straighten it... keeping in mind the resolution. Since the program can't know what you have in mind, it cares for the first step: dragging the image into the canvas while allowing you to see the max size of the dragged image and all the handles to do this. Hence the necessity to show all the image and to see it better ('fit in canvas'). What you see is a 'preview' for doing the best of your image, using a 'smart layer' in your layer palette. That layer displays the current state of your image depending on your choices for size, location and orientation. You can always change your mind later in your editing process. The smart layer is always calculated from the original dragged image. No quality loss. Warning you visually if the dragged image has to a low resolution.

You can still use older ways for bringing new images on your canvas, like the 'place' command or dragging layers from files opened at the same time. You don't get the ease of use, speed and flexibility (destructive workflow) of the 'drag from photo bin).

 

 

 

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines