Welcome Dialog

Welcome to the Community!

We have a brand new look! Take a tour with us and explore the latest updates on Adobe Support Community.


Clarification of technical issues on these images.

Community Beginner ,
Aug 08, 2021 Aug 08, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi

Can I have some more advice please? These images have been rejected on technical issues too. I'm thinking it is focus/sharpness? The Statue's face looks focused on thee chin, but not the eyes? The hand is focused on the thumb but depth of field is too shallow so fingers are not clear?

Thank you in advance for your time and patience!

TOPICS
Contributor critique

Views

157

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 3 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Aug 08, 2021 Aug 08, 2021
Zoom in on both photos to 150%. On the first you can see a blue halo between the sphere and her forehead. The second photo has artifacts.

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional , Aug 08, 2021 Aug 08, 2021
In addition to the halo that Ralph has pointed out, I think the forearms in the first image are underexposed. The second image seems to have almost nothing in focus, and the finger, or whatever it is, on the far right edge of the frame has been chopped off. Adobe Stock does not accept black and white conversions, per the instructions they've issued to Stock Contributors. The assumption is that Buyers can do that themselves if that's what they're looking for.  Even if both images were NOT rejecte...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional , Aug 08, 2021 Aug 08, 2021
1. Adobe Stock customers expect the highest visual and technical quality for use in their own projects. 2. Nobody buys B&W images.  Adobe Stock customers want full color with neutral white balance.  They can adjust color to their project's specifications in Photoshop or Lightroom, if required. See links below: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/reasons-for-content-rejection.htmlhttps://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/quality-and-technical-issues.htmlhttps://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html/stock/contributor/help/photography-illustrations.ug.htmlhttps://helpx.adobe.com/stock/how-to/tips-stock-image-acceptance.html...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 08, 2021 Aug 08, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Zoom in on both photos to 150%. On the first you can see a blue halo between the sphere and her forehead. The second photo has artifacts.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Aug 09, 2021 Aug 09, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you all for your feedback.
What causes the blue halo?
Many Thanks

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Aug 09, 2021 Aug 09, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Perhapse I should add that the Image was taken on an Sony Alpha a57 at ISO 640 1/320 at f6.3 with minimal post processing. So I would not have expected a problem. I would not have thought any dust was on the sensor either. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 09, 2021 Aug 09, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The blue halo is chromatic aberration. It's also present here:

Abambo_0-1628538165568.png

Why should a picture “taken on a Sony Alpha a57 at ISO 640 1/320 at f6.3 with minimal post-processing” cause no problems?

 

First ISO640 causes a lot of noise but 1/320 suggest that you would have reserves. If you did not shoot raw, the JPEG conversion was not exactly praised in the tests. There is possibility to use a digital zoom, you should never use that. Chromatic aberration needs post-processing. The contrast level and the exposure is not good.

 

And you are right: you need absolutely put the focus on the correct places. With portrait, the eyes are to be aimed at.

 

Additionally, I agree with @Jill_C on the IP problem.

 

If you are new to stock, you should consider these resources: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/tutorials.html
Please read the contributor user manual for more information on Adobe stock contributions: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html
See here for rejection reasons: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/reasons-for-content-rejection.html
and especially quality and technical issues: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/quality-and-technical-issues.html

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Aug 10, 2021 Aug 10, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi

Ok thank you. I know the higher ISO gives noisy images on the a57 but I though ISO 640 was relatively ok. It was also taken with a zoom. I did not know about the post processing for CA. Most of my photographic knowledge is from the old 35mm days and post processing is a new thing for me. 

 

One of the problems I am experiencing is that my monitor is a bit old and small and not easy to see these issues. Sure I can zoom in, but not sure what to expect at what level of magnification. 

 

I will study the tutorials.

Thank you 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 10, 2021 Aug 10, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST
quote

Hi

Ok thank you. I know the higher ISO gives noisy images on the a57 but I though ISO 640 was relatively ok.


By @PeteSW64

You need to look into all parameters: film speed (ISO for the youngsters), exposure and aperture.

 

Speed should be as low as possible to avoid noise. Just as a side note: noise is an interesting mean for adding character to your pictures. I've even added noise to bad pictures to make them optically more appealing, as noise hides other flaws easily and noise is not as unpleasant for the eye as are compression artefacts. But stock images need to be as noise free as possible to allow the buyer to modify at his needs.

 

Aperture should be chosen to give the required DOF. DOF should be used as an artistic mean to make the subject more visible against the (crowded) background. However, it is vital that the correct parts of the picture stay in focus.

 

Exposure time should be correctly chosen for a correct and equilibrated exposure, with details as well in the lighter areas as in the darker ones. Knowing the fact, that it is easier to recover detail in shadows than in highlights will help to expose correctly. The rest needs to be done in post.

quote

Most of my photographic knowledge is from the old 35mm days and post processing is a new thing for me. 

That's OK, there have been not that many changes meanwhile, except that the camera sensor, who has replaced the film is both, more flexible in some sense, and more restricted in other senses. But as you came from film, you've certainly learned to get it right in-camera, for most of the time.

 

However, post-processing did not change that much, even if there are many automatics built in the programs nowadays. But sure, it changes from using an automated Lab development. This was standard for most of the amateur photographers, because of the investment that needed to be made in space and equipment to develop on your own and especially for colour development. The lab is now been taken over by in-camera processing, and you should really consider RAW shooting and Lightroom or similar for post-processing.

quote

One of the problems I am experiencing is that my monitor is a bit old and small and not easy to see these issues. Sure I can zoom in, but not sure what to expect at what level of magnification. 

Good newer monitors are available for little money. As for the zoom level: 100% to judge sharpness, 200% to detect most artefacts.

 

 

 

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 08, 2021 Aug 08, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

In addition to the halo that Ralph has pointed out, I think the forearms in the first image are underexposed. The second image seems to have almost nothing in focus, and the finger, or whatever it is, on the far right edge of the frame has been chopped off. Adobe Stock does not accept black and white conversions, per the instructions they've issued to Stock Contributors. The assumption is that Buyers can do that themselves if that's what they're looking for.  Even if both images were NOT rejected for Technical Issues, they might have been rejected for Intellectual Property violations since a Property Release might required for these artworks.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 08, 2021 Aug 08, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

1. Adobe Stock customers expect the highest visual and technical quality for use in their own projects.

 

2. Nobody buys B&W images.  Adobe Stock customers want full color with neutral white balance.  They can adjust color to their project's specifications in Photoshop or Lightroom, if required.

 

See links below:

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines