Adobe Type Basics

New Here ,
Apr 09, 2018 Apr 09, 2018

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Where can I download Adobe Type Basics? I can no longer find a link on the Adobe site.

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Apr 09, 2018 Apr 09, 2018

The only font products that Adobe directly licenses are the Adobe Font Folio products. For purchases of licenses for individual Adobe original typefaces or font families, go to https://www.fontspring.com/foundry/adobe.

That having been said, the Adobe Type Basics collection of fonts is no longer available for licensing or for download.

          - Dov

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Apr 09, 2018 Apr 09, 2018

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The only font products that Adobe directly licenses are the Adobe Font Folio products. For purchases of licenses for individual Adobe original typefaces or font families, go to https://www.fontspring.com/foundry/adobe.

That having been said, the Adobe Type Basics collection of fonts is no longer available for licensing or for download.

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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New Here ,
Apr 09, 2018 Apr 09, 2018

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Thank you for the response. Strange that I'm no longer allowed to download a product I've licensed, and which should still work with current operating systems, but them's the breaks....

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Apr 10, 2018 Apr 10, 2018

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Actually there were a few different Adobe Type Basics packages over the years, the first of which included Type 1 fonts, the latest of which included OpenType CFF fonts.

I understand your angst about not being able to download a product that you licensed years back, but Adobe licenses do not guarantee that a download link will be available for the indefinite future afterwards, especially for these font products which didn't have any serial numbers associated with them. Quite frankly, this is exactly the scenario in which we continually advise any and all computer users to regularly backup their systems so that they can access old files.

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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Community Beginner ,
Jun 27, 2019 Jun 27, 2019

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I have a related question/problem.

I purchased the Adobe Type Basics package many moons ago and successfully used it on my Windows machines for quite some time. Recently I've updated my computer to Windows 10 and my Microsoft Office installation to the current version.

What happens now is that when I try to use one of these fonts within Word, it displays incorrectly. However, when I use Acrobat to convert the resulting document to PDF, it displays correctly. This says to me that the font installation has somehow gotten scrambled, so that Word doesn't know about the font properly even though Acrobat does.

Is there a way to reinstall all these old font files on my windows 10 system to ensure that everything is installed correctly. Note that unlike the earlier poster, I did save all my download files.

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Jun 28, 2019 Jun 28, 2019

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You didn't say what “vintage” Adobe Type Basics you have. If you have the older version that had Type 1 format fonts (.pfb and .pfm files) as opposed to OpenType CFF format fonts (.otf files), that would explain the problem. Current versions of Microsoft applications on Windows no longer support the old style Type 1 fonts that were part of the earlier versions of Adobe Type Basics. These applications do support the OpenType CFF versions of these fonts.

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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Community Beginner ,
Jun 28, 2019 Jun 28, 2019

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You are correct: I have the older version that has Type 1 fonts.

Here's an example of my problem: My machine has a font called "Palatino" that is one of the Adobe Type Basics font and, so far as I know, is only a Type 1. Word does not display that font correctly, although if I use Acrobat to "print" that same Word document as a PDF file, it displays correctly.

It also has a font called "Palatino Linotype," which, as far as I know, is distributed as part of Windows. That font works just fine, but its spacing and appearance are subtly different from the "Palatino" font.

So I'm trying to figure out how best to resolve the discrepancy without changing the appearance of old documents that use the older font.

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Jun 28, 2019 Jun 28, 2019

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ark@acm.org  wrote

You are correct: I have the older version that has Type 1 fonts. …

… So I'm trying to figure out how best to resolve the discrepancy without changing the appearance of old documents that use the older font.

As I mentioned in my previous response, recent versions of Microsoft Office applications on Windows no longer support any Type 1 fonts even though Windows 10 itself does provide limited Type 1 support. There is nothing that Adobe can do about that. (Windows does fully support OpenType CFF and OpenType TrueType formats!) The Palatino Linotype font family is as you noted, different than Adobe's Type 1 Palatino font family. Although Adobe used to license an OpenType CFF version of Palatino, we no longer do so other than part of the Adobe Font Folio product – that would be a very expensive solution.

A font that comes with Windows that is as close as possible to Adobe's Type 1 Palatino family is the Monotype Book Antiqua TrueType font family that is bundled with Windows. The font metrics match those of Palatino and the design is very close to that of Palatino. Windows TrueType Arial is font metrics equivalent to Adobe Type 1 Helvetica. Windows TrueType Times New Roman is font metrics equivalent to Adobe Type 1 Times Roman. Windows TrueType Century Gothic is font metrics compatible with Adobe Type 1 ITC Avant Garde. Windows TrueType Century Schoolbook is font metrics compatible with Adobe Type 1 New Century Schoolbook.

Hopefully this helps you a bit.

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020 Sep 25, 2020

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Hello, I work in music publishing, and work collaboratively with two colleagues in an effort to create a music typesetting program that would enable "legacy files" of a defunct, 16bit MS-DOS music typesetting program to be read and editable. This particular MS-DOS app, given the technology at the time, made provisions only for postscript type 1 fonts. Specifically, it allowed reference to all type 1 fonts contained in the Adobe Type Basics set.

By now, the type 1 fonts in this Adobe set are deprecated. In our current software development, we are drawing to screen via postscript, but to display these legacy fonts, we have to rely on emulated fonts, which is less than ideal, and a serious obstacle to processing legacy files properly.

My question pertains to licensing. Given that the postscript versions of the Adobe Type Basics set are no longer available for purchase and download, would we be able to embed these fonts in our envisioned release of the new software, without violating copyright and licensing restrictions? The original EULA, under "Transfer," states:

"You may not, rent, lease, sell, sublicense, un-bundle and/or repackage for distribution or resale ..."

Do you have any insight? Many thanks!

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LEGEND ,
Sep 25, 2020 Sep 25, 2020

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"would we be able to embed these fonts in our envisioned release of the new software, without violating copyright and licensing restrictions?" Absolutely and completely not! Licenses and copyright do not expire just because something is no longer sold. This is true of all old software, but doubly true of fonts, which can still be purchased in another form. This could be a very expensive mistake. (Caveat: I don't speak for Adobe).

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New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020 Sep 25, 2020

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Thank you for that; the reason for my asking is precisely because I know of no "release" into the public domain of these fonts as POSTSCRIPT type 1 fonts (not their open type equivalents); and I will need to track down some definitive answer as to Adobe's stance toward this deprecated set. I found a press release statement, dated May 1996, that stated, "A free (GNU Licensed) commercial-quality set of the basic 35 PostScript Type1 fonts is now finally available," but from that statement it is not clear to me whether this refers to the actual Adobe set, or the emulated set that forms part of Ghostscript (I suspect the latter). An online chat with some at Adobe has proved totally useless today... does anybody here know if Adobe has removed the licensing requirements? The set itself otherwise has no commercial value.

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LEGEND ,
Sep 25, 2020 Sep 25, 2020

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(no inside or privileged info included or implied in this reply)

"does anybody here know if Adobe has removed the licensing requirements?" Adobe not only has not removed the licensing requirements (why should they? It would assist people in making competing products), they CANNOT remove them. This is because they did not own the fonts. They licensed them. For example, Palatino was licensed from URW GmbH. While the terms are secret, I think we can assume Adobe paid URW and others for every PostScript printer shipped, and for every copy of Adobe Type Basics sold. So you would face action, not just from Adobe, but from type foundries, perhaps more than one foundry. The foundries, not Adobe, would also be free to give away their own fonts, and you could contact them for their terms. 

 

"The set itself otherwise has no commercial value." There are many situations where type 1 fonts are still usable, and the set has just as much value as it always did, even though it is no longer sold. And even if they are utterly useless, Adobe has never been inclined to give away IP because it is old.

 

I am not sure the obstacle of using a secondary level of good emulated fonts is as high as you state. Countless millions of clonescript printers (cheaper non-Adobe PostScript printers) used them. Did people really turn up at the printer makers with flaming torches...?

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New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020 Sep 25, 2020

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That's interesting, thank you very much for engaging with me on this.

 

You write, "Palatino was licensed from URW GmbH." In fact, URW was explicity (and solely) referenced in the press release I cited above. In that release one Peter Deutsch (apparently of Aladdin Enterprises) also wrote:

 

>>

The copyright holder of these fonts, URW++ Design and Development Incorporated (the successor to the former well-known URW company), was willing to release the fonts with the GPL and the AGFPL because they judged (correctly in my opinion) that these particular fonts have become such a commodity item, with such low profit margins, that the value to URW++ of having URW++`s name widely visible and appreciated on the net is now greater than the loss of profit from those future sales that the free licenses will cause not to occur.

<<

 

I get your point a a "secondary level of good emulated fonts". In fact, the screen display at the moment with Ghostscript equivalents is very good. But the "legacy files" will not contain these font references. We'll have to think about this some more, clearly...

 

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New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020 Sep 25, 2020

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Just realized (did not know this before) that Deutsch is the author of Ghostscript...

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LEGEND ,
Sep 25, 2020 Sep 25, 2020

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He is indeed.  

For an interpretation of the press release you may want to contact URW. Adobe, as I said, have no rights [that I know of] to start giving away URW's property. 

Clonescript interpreters have always included font name mapping for the base 13 or 35 fonts. Clonemakers weren't looking to make a product that only worked if you used different font names.

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New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020 Sep 25, 2020

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Thanks again! I really appreciate your insights; this is all very helpful.

 

I'll discuss with my colleagues. Cheers for now!

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Sep 25, 2020 Sep 25, 2020

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On behalf of Adobe, the definitive answer is absolutely no!

 

The original license terms still apply. You may not redistribute those fonts. You can embed the fonts in PDF and EPS files for display and print by others, but that is it!

 

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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