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NVidia GPU not being used

New Here ,
Oct 26, 2018 Oct 26, 2018

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Hi,

I have an Acer laptop with Intel 630 and NVidia GTX1060 6GB. CPU is i7 7700HQ.

However I noticed that while encoding videos in PPro CC 2019, it only uses the Intel 630. I have tried many methods to get it to use the NVidia, but all failed.

The video I'm encoding was taken with GoPro Hero7 in 4K. It has 13 files, a total length of nearly 2 hours. So the task is to join them into one and exporting in 4K.

When exporting, the Intel 630 usage would surge to 100% (in 3D) and stay up there, CPU is around 20%-30%, but the 1060 would stay at 0% - 5%, basically not getting any work at all.

I updated drivers for both CPU to the latest. Made sure in Media Encoder, AE and PPro that all set the encoder to CUDA - no help.

If I disable the Intel GPU, then PPro put all work load on the CPU and choking it.

I also tried in NVidia's PhysX settings, forcing the 1060 to be default GPU for PPro, and 1060 to be the CUDA GPU, still no good.

Tried the method in other posts, which is to disable the Intel 630, then run GPUSniffer, no good either.

Pretty much out of ideas now. Does anybody have a good answer to this?

Thanks very much!

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

LEGEND , Nov 09, 2018 Nov 09, 2018

In addition, what do (or did) you have for a CPU? A weakling 4-core/4-thread i5, even one of the Skylake generation, cannot take anywhere close to full advantage of that GTX 1060 with most workflows to begin with. This is because the GPU will become idle most of the time, waiting for the CPU to catch up. On the other hand, you do not want your GPU to be severely underpowered; otherwise, the CPU will be prevented from operating at its full potential even if the workload demands it.

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LEGEND ,
Oct 31, 2018 Oct 31, 2018

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Are there any effects on the export that are on the GPU Accelerated Effects list? If not, that would be the answer. PrPro uses the GPU for effects on that list (like color corrections & warp stabilizer) and for major resizing operations.

If you don't have any GPU Accelerated effects on the sequence, try setting an in/out point fairly close together, then apply a bunch of things in the Lumetri color panel just to use as many tools there as possible, then export just that section. See if the GPU use is higher.

Neil

GPU Accelerated Effects: https://helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/using/effects.html

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Explorer ,
Nov 08, 2018 Nov 08, 2018

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You're not alone ...  Same issue here with the GTX 1060 6GB, except my computer can only recognize one GPU, so my CPU gets blasted during sequence playback while my GPU is barely used.  (And yes, I have CUDA enabled)  I have also seen this issue discussed with other NVidia graphics card.   Sadly, I have not found any solution to the issue, so it appears for now that a GPU is not a very good investment for improving performance in Adobe Premiere Pro!

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LEGEND ,
Nov 08, 2018 Nov 08, 2018

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PrPro is lousy at getting past an enabled on-board "gpu" chipset. That's another series of posts on the UserVoice ... pushing for allowing user-selection of the GPU to be used when there are multiple ones enabled on a machine. This is ​badly​ needed!

As always, one needs to know what PrPro is going to do before building/buying a computer. Then you can make one that really does make PrPro quite happy. Or ... you can spend a lot of money, and get not much for it.

My first build for video editing was a bust ... my builder was a hot gamer, "knew" video work, and made a machine accordingly. After he and I both cooled off ... and gave that machine to my wife (we have a portrait studio, she does all the stills processing) he built one for PrPro ​as it is.​ Which had vastly better performance and only moderately higher cost. And completely different parts.

We need to all press for better utilization of the GPU within PrPro ... and in the meantime ... it is also wise to learn what PrPro will use before spending money on rigs. If you're gonna go sand-racing, you don't go buy a hot Audi, right? Sadly, this is much the same.

Neil

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Explorer ,
Nov 09, 2018 Nov 09, 2018

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I have an interesting update to share ...  Previously I only used the GTX 1060 6GB, because why would I bother hooking up any of my monitors to the integrated Intel HD Graphics 530, right?  But as I previously posted, Premiere Pro didn't seem to use the GPU much and would blast my CPU at 100% usage, requiring me to constantly render in/out to get smooth playback of the timeline.  Well, I tried hooking up one monitor to the GTX and one to the integrated graphics and then tried playback in Adobe Premiere Pro ...  And what do you know?  Now I can play unrendered 4k h264 footage and my CPU utilization doesn't go above 30%, the Intel 530 utilization is at about 60% and the GTX sits at about 6%.  If I play footage that I previously rendered with the GTX, usage on the GTX goes up to 15% and Intel usage goes down to about 15%.  Proof if you needed it that Premiere Pro works better with integrated graphics than more powerful discrete graphics cards.  I'm shocked that Adobe hasn't fixed such a big issue.  I guess I'll sell my GTX 1060 to a gamer.

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LEGEND ,
Nov 09, 2018 Nov 09, 2018

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In most rigs, PrPro works fine with dedicated GPUs. When you can disable the integrated one as on most desktops there is no issue of course.

But he users need the ability to set which GPU is in prime use by the program. Which is where posts and votes about this on the UserVoice system are most effective to get that change.

Neil

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Explorer ,
Nov 09, 2018 Nov 09, 2018

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What is your CPU % utilization and GPU % utilization when playing unrendered h264 video? 

When my integrated GPU was disabled, Premiere Pro mostly ignored the GTX 1060 during playback and relied heavily on CPU.  This causes the need to work with proxies or to constantly render.  It was only during rendering, adding special effects and exporting when I saw the GTX utilization spike.  Everyone keeps saying that is normal, that Premiere Pro doesn’t use the GPU for playback, BUT that does not appear to be the case because when I enabled my integrated Intel GPU, Premiere began using that GPU heavily for playback and CPU usage went way down.  That is why I think this is an issue.  When my integrated GPU is disabled, why isn’t Adobe utilizing the dedicated GPU for playback like it utilizes the integrated GPU when that is enabled? 

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LEGEND ,
Nov 09, 2018 Nov 09, 2018

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In addition, what do (or did) you have for a CPU? A weakling 4-core/4-thread i5, even one of the Skylake generation, cannot take anywhere close to full advantage of that GTX 1060 with most workflows to begin with. This is because the GPU will become idle most of the time, waiting for the CPU to catch up. On the other hand, you do not want your GPU to be severely underpowered; otherwise, the CPU will be prevented from operating at its full potential even if the workload demands it.

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LEGEND ,
Nov 09, 2018 Nov 09, 2018

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Oh, I forgot to mention this:

Since you're playing back (decoding) H.264 video, CUDA is NEVER used, in your case. Only Intel's QuickSync feature is used - but the CPU MUST both be equipped with integrated graphics AND have that integrated graphics enabled. So, if your CPU doesn't have integrated graphics at all, or if it does have integrated graphics but the feature is disabled, then there is no QuickSync feature, and thus Premiere will only use software-only (or CPU-only) playback.

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Explorer ,
Nov 10, 2018 Nov 10, 2018

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Thank you for this explanation...  But I wonder why Adobe doesn’t take better advantage of a discrete GPU for h264 decoding.  If I open any 4K h264 videos in the Windows default TV & Movies application, I can see that it’s utilizing my GTX 1060 and as a result I have perfectly smooth playback. 

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New Here ,
Dec 01, 2019 Dec 01, 2019

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It definitely needs it. It´s very very annoying to pay that amount of money and to be not able to utilize specific GPUs without disabling the integrated GPU in the system.

I have a RTX 2070 and the Premiere Pro uses my integrated GPU, while freeware video software are able to let me choose, even if they are years older??

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Community Beginner ,
Dec 16, 2018 Dec 16, 2018

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I have been doing some research on this and it looks like there are two points :

1. Quick Sync Video enablement for H.264 using the inbuilt Intel chipset. This leverages Intel's previously developed software capability and enables you to encode to h.264 faster (not render).

2. GPU rendering Adobe will only support a certain number of chipsets going forward and yours is not one of them. This is to do with the GPURendering and not related to the H.264 Quick Sync Video encoding as far as I understand it :

NVIDIA hardware rendering engine (CUDA) no long works with Premiere Pro 2019/AME and NVIDIA (P6000)

Adobe Premiere Pro CC System Requirements

Hope this helps, I need to upgrade my Nividia Quadro 2000 graphics card as a result if I want faster GPU rendering.

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LEGEND ,
Jul 27, 2019 Jul 27, 2019

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Peter_Sodhi  wrote

GPU rendering Adobe will only support a certain number of chipsets going forward and yours is not one of them.

That policy has been changed as of the 13.1.x release: Adobe has now expanded its "recommended" CUDA list to include almost all of the currently available GPUs down to the GTX 1650. That includes the GTX 1060 and its mobile variants. And of the GTX, RTX and Titan GPUs that can use the NVIDIA Studio Drivers, only the GTX 1050 and 1050 Ti are left off the list.

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Community Beginner ,
Feb 10, 2024 Feb 10, 2024

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