Unwanted execution of Javascript function with forms on different pages

Adobe Community Professional ,
May 12, 2022 May 12, 2022

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Hi all, I'm using Acrobat DC Pro 2022.001.20112 and this is my first time doing any javascript in Acrobat although I'm otherwise comfortable with ExtendScript from other Adobe apps. I'll explain my set up first and then explain my problem.

 

I've set up a document with 2 pages and some form elements on each page. Page 1 has a few Checkboxes with no calculations. Page 2 has a bunch of text fields that each have a javascript calculation that calls a document-level javascript function to do a simple calculation. The function itself works fine, but I'll post it here just in case it has a bearing on my problem:

function getBudgetCostDifference() {
    console.println(event.target.name);
    var index = Number(event.target.name.split('.')[1]),
        val1 = Number(this.getField('budget.' + index).value),
        val2 = Number(this.getField('cost.' + index).value),
        result = 0;

    if (val1 === val1 && val2 === val2)
        result = val1 - val2;

    event.value = result;
    console.println('  done!');
}

So there are about 20 fields on page 2 that have the following calculation:

getBudgetCostDifference();

This set up works perfectly and the calculations work fine... except:

 

When I click a checkbox on page 1 the form on page 2 is re-calculated. Every time. Even though nothing is happening to the form on page 2 I see the console output from the above function. The field names are totally different: checkbox.1 checkbox.2 etc. on page 1 and budget.1 cost.1 difference.1 etc. on page 2.

 

So anyone know what's going on here? Is this normal behaviour? If the forms are treated as a single form, can I logically separate them? My ideal aim is for the javascript function to only be executed when the form fields values it refers to are modified.

 

Any help is much appreciated!

- Mark

TOPICS
JavaScript , PDF forms

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

LEGEND , May 12, 2022 May 12, 2022

1. There is only one form, made up of all of the form fields on all of the pages. There is no way to subdivide into logically separate forms. 
2. All calculation scripts run after any change. Acrobat has no way to know the dependencies between fields (since scripts can refer to field names dynamically), so it runs them all in calculation order. 
3. Except for occasional performance problems, this shouldn't be an issue. Calculation scripts run a LOT so they should be efficient and without side effe

...

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LEGEND ,
May 12, 2022 May 12, 2022

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1. There is only one form, made up of all of the form fields on all of the pages. There is no way to subdivide into logically separate forms. 
2. All calculation scripts run after any change. Acrobat has no way to know the dependencies between fields (since scripts can refer to field names dynamically), so it runs them all in calculation order. 
3. Except for occasional performance problems, this shouldn't be an issue. Calculation scripts run a LOT so they should be efficient and without side effects. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 12, 2022 May 12, 2022

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Thanks @Test Screen Name, excellent clarification! Knowing that, I'll do some actual tests and, if performance seems lacking, I'll explicitly specify each field by name rather than working it out dynamically which will remove a few steps.

 

Do you know whether there are performance advantages to using "Simplified field notation" over hard-coded javascript calculation?

 

I realise I may be over-thinking things.

- Mark

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LEGEND ,
May 13, 2022 May 13, 2022

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I've never really checked, but I *think* that Simplified Field Notation is turned into JavaScript behind the scenes, then executed.  Your script does not look too expensive - this starts to be an issue if

- the calculations have large overhead 

- there are a large number of form fields

- a large number of calculations are triggered as side effects, for example needlessly setting the values of other fields in calculate scripts, which will trigger further calculations, calling all calculate scripts...

Also, do check the calculation order carefully. Don't assume it will just run from top to bottom.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 13, 2022 May 13, 2022

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Thanks again @Test Screen Name. Yes I appreciate the mention of calculation order—it was definitely something I had to adjust.

- Mark

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 13, 2022 May 13, 2022

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if (val1 === val1 && val2 === val2)

Why does you use this if?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 13, 2022 May 13, 2022

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This checks for NaN. It's a weird fact that in JavaScript NaN ≠ NaN. So a var containing NaN won't equal itself.

 

EDIT: See try67's comment below. I didn't realise there was a built-in method. Best to use that. I'll change my line to

if (isNaN(val1) && isNaN(val2))

- Mark

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 13, 2022 May 13, 2022

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Use the built-in isNaN() method for that.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 13, 2022 May 13, 2022

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Thank you! That is much better! 🙂

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