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is there a good tutorial to rip a vinyl and edit with audition?

Enthusiast ,
Jan 02, 2017 Jan 02, 2017

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hi

i know there several program maded to rip vinyl to computer

i own a Pro-Ject good record player and great cable to connect even my pc to my amply

i have audition the last version of audition cc , acon Acon Digital Restoration Suite & RX Plug-in Pack in trial mode

a friend of mine has RX Post Production Suite and a program to rip the vinyl the result is really amazing

about me , i can affort such program is so exansive i can't buy it

is there a deep resource on the net that help me to obtain the best?

i googled a lot , there are a lot of sites and videos ,but mostly or all of them (which i found) doesn't go in the deep

thanks

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People's Champ ,
Jan 02, 2017 Jan 02, 2017

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To transfer vinyl into a computer is more a case of needing hardware rather than software.  Basically you need a turntable, a phono preamp (both of which is sounds like you have) then an analogue to digital converter.   You may be able to do this with an adaptor cable to convert the L/R RCA/Phono jacks on your amplifier to plug into the 3.5mm stereo jack on your computer.  However, built in sound cards are notoriously poor quality and, if you want best results, you're better off with an external USB audio interface.

Probably the cheapest of these that could do the job for you would be a Behringer UCA222 which would allow you to patch from your amplifier to the interface and into Audition.  There's also a unit called the UFO202 that has a builti in phono pre amp that would let you bypass your amp--though as long as you amp is a decent one there's no reason to do this.

Anyway, once you have the vinyl disk recorded in your computer, Audition has a nice range of retoration tools that would probably do the job for you.  If you check under Effects/Noise Reduction and Restoration you'll find tools to remove background noise/his and also a click remover.  For serious clicks, you can do some manual editing in the Spectral Frequency Display.

There are various tutorials on using these features but if you go to Help/Audition Learn and scroll down, you'll find a good tutorial on noise reduction.

To end, there are highly specialised tools for restoring vinyl but you'd likely spend more on just one feature there than for all of Audition.  I know of at least one person who makes his living restoring vinyl who uses Audition as part of his workflow.

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Community Expert ,
Jan 02, 2017 Jan 02, 2017

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Well, if you want a little more depth, let me begin to explain what some of the issues you will run into are:

Bob Howes wrote:

 

To transfer vinyl into a computer is more a case of needing hardware rather than software. Basically you need a turntable, a phono preamp (both of which is sounds like you have) then an analogue to digital converter.

 

You have to be a little careful. Whilst Audition and software like iZotope's RX can do an excellent job of removing most of vinyl's shortcomings, the results still obey the basic rules of all recording - nothing can be made any better than the inherent quality of your original. If you don't expend a significant amount of both money and time on setting up a good turntable and cartridge then the results you will get will at best be mediocre - whatever software you apply to them. Getting good results out of vinyl really isn't the easiest thing to do, although mediocre results - well that's not difficult. But you won't be able to improve on this with the software, whatever you do.

 

The mediocre results usually come about because of tracking errors, which cause significant distortions, and these have many causes. Not the least of these would be the use of an indifferent cartridge and stylus. On top of that, you'll have any damage already caused to the disk by careless playing to deal with, and it's a little perverse, but the more you clean up a recording made like this, the more obvious these defects become.

 

So if you only have a cooking-grade turntable and cartridge, then it's really not worth spending a fortune on software. I use a Thorens turntable with an SME arm and a specialist Technics cartridge, and I can get really good results from this (think roughly CD quality from a good-condition disk), but this hardware rig, even before we've even digitised the results, would cost over £1500 to replace at today's prices*. But in order to get this to work well, I've had to adjust six interacting settings around the pickup arm, and it took about a day to get it right. And also arrange for the turntable to be isolated and carefully leveled. And you have to be really careful to clean records, and try to eliminate the static build-up, before recording them, otherwise you end up with far more work to do than you really need.

 

Doing a good job of transferring vinyl is at best a time-consuming job, and generally it's only worth it if you can't get the CD from anywhere. If you have the time and inclination, then fine, go for it - but it can be quite frustrating to get things to work properly. Out of the cheaper end turntables, the Pro-ject ones get quite good reviews - but you still need to spend the time on them to get them to work properly - and the arms they come with are a little on the 'basic' side, so it's unlikely that you'll get absolutely the best results. It's worth looking at proper arm setup instructions though - try http://thevinylfactory.com/features/how-to-balance-your-tonearm-a-step-by-step-guide/ for instance.

 

*updated 2023

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Enthusiast ,
Jan 02, 2017 Jan 02, 2017

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hi

thanks a lot

i own a soundblaster Sound Blaster Audigy Rx  is not godd enough isn't?

do i need a external USB audio interface ? or my sound card is enough

thanks a lot because my approach was different , record platey -> amply -> linout ->audio card  ->record with my pc and start to play viny

happy new year (late)

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Community Expert ,
Jan 02, 2017 Jan 02, 2017

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Giovannivolontè wrote:

hi

thanks a lot

i own a soundblaster Sound Blaster Audigy Rx is not godd enough isn't?

do i need a external USB audio interface ? or my sound card is enough

If you have a turntable with a cartridge output and no RIAA preamp, the Rx won't do, as it doesn't have a phono preamp. If you have a turntable with a preamp in it, so it has a line output, then you will be able to use the Soundblaster (even though we don't like them because of their dodgy drivers) - just use a line input. If you have a turntable with a USB output, you don't need a sound device at all to get signals from your turntable, as it will have digitised the signal already.

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Enthusiast ,
Jan 02, 2017 Jan 02, 2017

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hi Steve

turntable with a preamp in it

is a record player with an amplificator inside ?

and are there external very good external audio card usb?

what do you have inside your pc?

thanks

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Community Expert ,
Jan 02, 2017 Jan 02, 2017

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Giovannivolontè wrote:

hi Steve

turntable with a preamp in it

is a record player with an amplificator inside ?

Yes... If you tell me exactly which version of the Pro-Ject turntable you've got, I can tell you what you need! For instance, the Essential 2 needs a phono preamp, but (fairly obviously) the Elemental 2 USB doesn't!

and are there external very good external audio card usb?

what do you have inside your pc?

For a Pro-Ject Essential 2 turntable, something like the Rega Fono Mini A2D would be an appropriate choice. The sound device in my PC you can't get any more - it's an E-Mu 1820M,  but it does a heck of a lot more besides having a phono preamp in it.

Should also mention that if you are going to make a good job of any digitising, you need a fairly decent set of monitor speakers to listen to the results on, otherwise it's rather difficult to tell what, if anything, you need to do with the frequency response and stereo spread, etc - both of these are often compromised on vinyl to take account the physical limitations of the media.

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Enthusiast ,
Jan 02, 2017 Jan 02, 2017

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hi

i own exactly a PRO-JECT Debut Carbon DC Black , i avoid the record player with usb stick

a friend of mine owns PRO-JECT Essential II Digital Black

in short i have to use Rega Fono Mini A2D to connect the record player -> to Rega Fono Mini A2D  -> to my pc and avoid my amply

Should also mention that if you are going to make a good job of any digitising, you need a fairly decent set of monitor speakers to listen to the results on, otherwise it's rather difficult to tell what, if anything, you need to do with the frequency response and stereo spread, etc - both of these are often compromised on vinyl to take account the physical limitations of the media.

i think to use headphone and work with audition cc

thanks STEVE!!!

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New Here ,
Feb 16, 2023 Feb 16, 2023

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Does the 'one person who make his living restoring vinyl' still doing it?  I have some very rare vinyl albums I would like to save to mp3's or wav.  Would it be possible for me to contact this person?

 

 

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Community Expert ,
Feb 16, 2023 Feb 16, 2023

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I don't know who Bob knew (we haven't heard from him for several years) but the only person I know of still making a living out of this (I think) is Andrew Rose at Pristine Audio - haven't heard from hm for a while, but his website is still live.

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Community Beginner ,
Feb 16, 2023 Feb 16, 2023

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This thread really helped me get started.  Here is the Audacity main link:

https://manual.audacityteam.org/ 

 

This troubleshoot got me out of my jam:

Audacity Troubleshoot Page 

 

Thank you to all who contributed toward this thread.  I really appreicate it.

PS:  I upload my vinyl and edit on Adobe Soundbooth via USB, but the Audacity site helped me.  

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