multitrack working @48 with audio@44.1,and resample at 44.1,is it a big mistake?

Enthusiast ,
Dec 07, 2017 Dec 07, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

hi

i don't know but i have audition cc 2018 & 2015 and when i import a file i miss always the fade out icon

i fix it only creating a multi track with sample rate 48000

now my question , i work mostly with flac files (mostly @44.1  ripped from cd ) and other audio like mp3 or mp4 (many of them have a sample rate of 44.1)

when i drag my 44.1 audio on the multi track with sample rate 48000 i got this warning

HVZhtj7.png

now my question  ?

outside mp3 or mp4 lossy format , but i work with flac too , when i Mixdown section to a new file or export multitrack   @ 44.1 (because i have to burn )

1)

do I commit a big mistake i term of degraded audio ?

2)

working with flac audio @44.1 import to a multitrack session with sample rate @48000 and after re-sample at 44.1 , do I lose audio quality ,audio frequency ?

thanks

Ps

Windows 10 pro 64bit

sorry for my poor english

Views

1.5K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Dec 07, 2017 Dec 07, 2017
Audition's sample rate conversion is the best there is - that's been independently verified some years ago. That said, if you are going to do sample rate conversions, you really should, however it works out, only do them once. So if you have a flac file at 48k and you want to put it in a 44.1k session, then ideally you do the sample rate conversion first. But it doesn't actually matter if you let it happen automatically in a multitrack session - it's only doing what you would have done anyway. T...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 07, 2017 Dec 07, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Audition's sample rate conversion is the best there is - that's been independently verified some years ago. That said, if you are going to do sample rate conversions, you really should, however it works out, only do them once. So if you have a flac file at 48k and you want to put it in a 44.1k session, then ideally you do the sample rate conversion first. But it doesn't actually matter if you let it happen automatically in a multitrack session - it's only doing what you would have done anyway. The only difference is that it uses automated settings, rather than letting you choose them.

So if you want to burn the results to a CD, then have the session as a 44.1k one. If you need the result for anything else as a 48k file, then sample-rate convert the final mixdown file back, as you'll be sample-rate converting your actual mix, which is presumably what you need.

The inherent quality loss in MP3 or MP4 files is way greater than any loss you get in sample-rate conversion.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Dec 07, 2017 Dec 07, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi SteveG

only do them once

i read it

so start a multitrack @48k and drag @48k and 44.1k files  and after converting to 44.1k is a mistake

seeing as i drag 44.1k in a multitrak @48k there is first resample and converting again to 44.1 it's the second resample

right?

but if i have to work with @48k and @44.1k together is the only solution isn't it?

about the sample rate (it's just a curiosity about audition) is audition dipendent by the external audio card or internal audio card?

i mean if the audio card (just an example) doesn't support 96000 , i create new single audio from  @96000 will audion show it avaible and play the audio or will not show in the option the 96000 sample rate ?

thanks SteveG

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 07, 2017 Dec 07, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The safest thing to do if you have to work with two sample rates is to have two versions of all the source files - one at 44,1k and the other at 48k. That way you only ever have to convert each file once!

about the sample rate (it's just a curiosity about audition) is audition dipendent by the external audio card or internal audio card?

i mean if the audio card (just an example) doesn't support 96000 , i create new single audio from  @96000 will audion show it avaible and play the audio or will not show in the option the 96000 sample rate ?

Sample rate conversion has nothing whatsoever to do with your sound device - it's a purely computational process. Whether your sound device can play the resulting file is another matter altogether, and completely unrelated.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Dec 07, 2017 Dec 07, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

hi StevG

The safest thing to do if you have to work with two sample rates is to have two versions of all the source files - one at 44,1k and the other at 48k. That way you only ever have to convert each file once!

great advise!

Sample rate conversion has nothing whatsoever to do with your sound device - it's a purely computational process. Whether your sound device can play the resulting file is another matter altogether, and completely unrelated.

just my curiosity  because i converted an audio to a sample rate on a computer that doesn't support it

but i can playback

have you seen such issue in audition cc 2018/2015 ? 2014 is perfect  , maybe testing on different machine , i have seen on 3 machine

https://forums.adobe.com/message/10024763?et=watches.email.thread#10024763

thanks

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Dec 10, 2017 Dec 10, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Audition's sample rate conversion is the best there is - that's been independently verified some years ago.

hi

may i ask a question?

i want to convert several audio files ,mp3 ,mp4 and flac with audition cc to burn on a cd

i don't know what mp3 or mp4 encoder/decoder does it use audition cc

in the past i have always used foobar to convert mp3 /mp4 and flac to wave 44.1 /16bit

but seeing

Audition's sample rate conversion is the best there is - that's been independently verified some years ago.

i will use audition batch process

might you please tell me which settings should i use to have the best output

41Og7FN.png

H02F2MO.png

thanks

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 10, 2017 Dec 10, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hang on a minute - I said sample rate conversion, and MP3 decoding doesn't come into that at all. In fact, you don't get a choice with Audition - there is only one MP3 decoder, and that's the legal Fraunhofer one that they pay a license for. You decode your MP3 files to 44.1k Stereo wav files, and that's what you have to burn to a CD if you want to play it as audio.

If for some reason you end up with 32-bit files from the decode, then the option you need to convert these is the third one down in the list - the one with triangular dither. You absolutely don't want 'no dither', and the adaptive noise shaping one confers no significant benefits, and has one huge downside if you're converting a lot of tracks, and that is that it's inevitably very slow to calculate and apply.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Dec 10, 2017 Dec 10, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

If for some reason you end up with 32-bit files from the decode, then the option you need to convert these is the third one down in the list

Hi , I got it

what program do you use to decode flac , mp3(moslty are 48K)  and other formats to wave 44.1k ?

and if i may ,what format do you use when you work with audition cc flac?

thank you

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
LEGEND ,
Dec 10, 2017 Dec 10, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Well Audition can open any of those types of audio files. So, of course, I would use it to do any conversions, especially as it's sample rate conversion is so good. And as .wav is Audition's native format any files worked on will be in that format. Any other audio file format would only be used if the final version is required in anything other format than .wav. And then the final edited file would be kept as .wav for archiving and only converted to any other for delivery.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Jan 16, 2022 Jan 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi Steve

I know it's old ,but may I ask you a question ?

I have read on the net that the best resampler is Illustrate dBpoweramp and after Sox

there some tests about re-sampling from 96000  to 44100 here 

 

does audition cc use the same dBpoweramp /SSRC engine ?

and even in the older versions like cs6 (just curiosity for the old version)?

thanks

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

There is very little difference between some of the conversions now - there's no way that any of the others constitute 'best', and anyway, comparisons are odious at that level.

 

Of course Audition doesn't use anybody else's engine! You have to bear in mind that for many years, Audition was unequalled at this, and it's way more likely that they've licenced Adobe's engine, I'd say. Adobe did tweak the conversion engine a little back in the mists of time but essentially it's the same engine that Cool Edit used, with a few inaudible noise floor alterations.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines