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VO Recording in Audition - effects & gain don't seem to change live recording

New Here ,
Apr 07, 2022 Apr 07, 2022

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Hello all!

I'm relatively new to using Adobe Audition. I have used it for some basic recording and noise removal in the past, but now I am working on recording some VO. I am trying to apply effects (compressor & Parametric EQ) to a track in the multitrack editor for use while recording live (I want the effects to be applied while recording to prevent clipping and some background hum). Supposedly these should effect the recording as it is being recorded, correct? However I am not seeing any change to my recording as a result of adding these effects. I also don't seem to be able to adjust the gain effectively.

Any advice or feedback would be much appreciated - thank you!

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How to , User interface or workspaces

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Community Expert ,
Apr 07, 2022 Apr 07, 2022

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Sorry, no - incorrect, and it's by design. It has always been good practice to record dry; if you apply effects to a recording as it's recorded there's no way to undo this if you change your mind. What happens in Multitrack is that you can apply effects to your track, and you'll hear them in the monitoring, but if you remove them after you've stopped, you'll be left with the unaffected track. If you don't remove them, then obviously they will still be applied to your recording.

 

Gain setting is not an Audition function - Audition records exactly what it's sent from your sound device - very reliably. If you are recording a mic, it's normal not to let the audio get to over -12dB, and you have to adjust your mic input stage to achieve this. The space between -12 and 0dB is called 'headroom' and you would be expected to adjust the final level using Normalize. The purpose of headroom is to allow for unexpected peaks. If you're using compression in the form of a limiter, there's a little more to it - you have to normalize twice to get the levels correct. First you normalize the raw recording to 0dB. You do this because that's the value that all the compressor controls relate to. When you've finished applying your limiting, then you have to normalize again to get your peak level back to a more sensible value. For instance, if you flattened the top 9dB off (this is quite a normal amount) then your signal would be at -9dB afterwards, and you'd need to renormalise back to just below 0dB to take advantage of the raised levels.

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