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Create HDRs from Stacks in Bridge

Community Beginner ,
Sep 05, 2022 Sep 05, 2022

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I'm trying to create a bunch of HDRs.  I used the Auto-Stack Panorama/HDR tool in Bridge to create the stacks and double checked them for accuracy.  Is there a way to export the stack as an HDR?  

 

I see the option to Export to DNG, but when comparing the DNG to the originals, it looks exactly like the first of the three originals, so I don't think that's it.

 

If there is a way to Batch Process all of them at once, that's ebven better.

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Community Expert , Sep 05, 2022 Sep 05, 2022

Hi Patrick,

 

Not quite. I'm going to go into a tad of detail about what's happening when you do this, so my answer might make a bit more sense.

 

Bridge can stack the proto-HDR images, but that's about it. Once collected, when you open/double-click those images, they open in ACR, it is from there that the HDR image is made — not Bridge. Since that is outside of Bridge, that is why the stack cannot be exported — there's nothing to export as the HDR from Bridge because Bridge did not create the H

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Community Expert ,
Sep 05, 2022 Sep 05, 2022

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Hi Patrick,

 

Not quite. I'm going to go into a tad of detail about what's happening when you do this, so my answer might make a bit more sense.

 

Bridge can stack the proto-HDR images, but that's about it. Once collected, when you open/double-click those images, they open in ACR, it is from there that the HDR image is made — not Bridge. Since that is outside of Bridge, that is why the stack cannot be exported — there's nothing to export as the HDR from Bridge because Bridge did not create the HDR.

 

Any image you look at in Bridge can be exported to DNG, but if the HDR hasn't been generated yet, Bridge cannot export that which has not yet been generated. Again, Bridge is not the tool that creates the HDR image; ACR is the tool. 

 

And lastly, no. Unfortunately, ACR does not have the ability to Batch process the HDR process. However, Lightroom Classic does have that ability.

 

All good questions, I hope this makes sense.

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Community Beginner ,
Sep 05, 2022 Sep 05, 2022

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Hey Gary - Thanks for the quick response.  I was afraid that was going to be the answer.

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Community Expert ,
Sep 05, 2022 Sep 05, 2022

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Glad to help.

 

The "Wonder Engine" in all this is Adobe Camera Raw. It is truly a wonder. 

 

BTW, the difference between ACR and any of the Lightroom applications is that they are ACR with a database. That makes them a whole new ballgame, which actually makes them ACR into an application. Otherwise, ACR is a plugin in either Bridge or Photoshop. As such, ACR as a plugin has limitations that any of the Lightroom applications do not have — even though they are running the same kernel engine.

 

BTW, since you do HDR and you use ACR, here's an interesting tip: We have always been taught that to do HDR, you need at least three images, two stops apart. Such as -2, 0, and +2. But that was originally developed when using JPG images as most cameras at the time could only deliver jpg images. If you are taking raw images, you only need to use two images: -2 & +2.

 

So why is this? Let's imagine a full dynamic range image as 36˝ long. A jpg image has (let's say) 15˝ of dynamic range, so to cover that 36˝, you need three of them with some overlap. But raw images have a lot more data and, therefore, a greater dynamic range; let's say 20˝ of content. This is more than enough to cover the 36˝.

 

So how many do I take? Usually, three because if I find that later, my "zero" image has sufficient coverage of the image's dynamic range, I'll toss out or not use the outside two. On the other hand, if I'm in an area of extreme dynamic range (e.g., a dark church with brilliant windows), I very well may set my camera to take five or even seven images. Then later, at the computer, I'll work on which combination gives me the best image.

 

Enjoy!

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Community Beginner ,
Sep 05, 2022 Sep 05, 2022

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I'm new to the whole HDR thing.  I used to do bracketing on my Canon 5D Mark iv and would do 5 shots.  I leanred about HDR shortly before going on Holiday, but only learned about the built in feature on the camera.  I later discovered that Adobe can create the HDRs, giving me the option to continue to shoot my 5-bracket and figure out the developing later.

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Community Expert ,
Sep 05, 2022 Sep 05, 2022

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HI Patrick,

 

What I strongly encourage you to do is to take some of your "five" shot sets and play with them. You do not have to delete anything, and since you're working with raw images, so nothing is lost, and nothing is permanently altered.

 

But let's say you shot every "one" stop. Create an HDR from -2. -1. 0. +1, +2. 

Now deselect two and create a new one with -2, 0, +2

Finally, deselect one and create one more with -2, +2.

 

Compare the three images. What do you see is different, what is the same? Can you make any adjustments in one that you like better than the same adjustment in the other two? Fifteen years ago, you'd see folks saying, "I took this shot with 10 shots every 1/2 stop!!" What can I say? It made them happy.

 

I've been doing HDR for about 20 years, and this kind of experimentation is fantastic for giving you the background to go into a new environment and know what to do and what you'll need. Just like any kind of photography! :>)

 

BTW, I have a 7Dm2, and I'm sure you have the same kind of auto exposure bracketing. That was one of the reasons I bought this camera. Enjoy!!

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