Any way to setup Conical design layout for vinyl wrap and laser engraving?

Engaged ,
Apr 03, 2022 Apr 03, 2022

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I have a design that I am trying to engrave onto a glass that is conical in shape. The circumfrence of the bottom is shorter than that of the brim/top. When I try to engrave, the image is stretched and skewed for obvious reasons. I try to go into Illustrator, which is where I create my designs in the first place, and use envelope Distort (mesh -> 3 columns, 1 row) to squish just the sides in, and leave the center part alone for the most part. This helps a lot, but its a pain to due and can only eyeball. I have looked everywhere for instructions on vinyl wraps and engraving of conical objects, but theres absolutely nothing for Adobe Illustrator. I purchased an expensive plugin called Ai ToolBox Conical Label Maker, but it seems to make it worse. I've swapped dimensions, and its no help.

 

Can anyone please help me?

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Draw and design , How to , Third party plugins , Tools

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 04, 2022 Apr 04, 2022

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varxtis,

 

You may take the considerations in the latest post here into account,

https://community.adobe.com/t5/illustrator-discussions/label-for-conical-shape-container/td-p/119098...

 

maybe especially whether a simple adaptation to the conical shape is usable or a (further) customization is needed.

 

Can you give some measures determining the boundaries/outer shape/size of the design/wrap, also in relation to the actual conical shape?

 

 

Edit: The latest paragraph has been edited to replace some nonsense by something that hopefully makes sense (see the other thread)

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 23, 2022 Apr 23, 2022

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varxtis,

 

The following is based on your specifications, given in the other thread,

 

"Top/brim 85.6mm diameter
bottom/base (liquid fill start point - absolute lowest point for graphics) 63.6mm diameter
Height 138mm"

 

and presuming that the 138 mm is the height between the top and bottom measurement points measured along the glass surface rather than the total height of the glass and/or measured vertically, in other words the height available for graphics on the surface,

 

and further presuming that you wish to have the graphics (be able to) go all the way round the glass based on your mentioning a full wrap,

 

you can:

 

1) Create a rectangle with W = 234.363 mm and H = 138 mm, W being the circumference at the middle where the diameter is 74.6 mm, then ensure that Scale Strokes and Effects is unticked; give the rectangle a cut/die line and no fill, then copy the empty rectangle and hide the original;

2) Change the value of W to 197.807 mm (keeping H at 138 mm), then apply Effect>Warp>Arc with Bend = 16%, then print the wrap = the warped rectangle, then wrap it round the glass to ensure that it fits with the side edges abutted (closely enough);

 

Failing a sufficiently accurate fit, maybe owing to inaccuracy in the specifications and/or stretching (or shrinking) of the wrap, 1) - 2) must be redone with corrected values (please state actual inaccuracies); once established, you can:

 

3) Show a copy of the original rectangle created in 1) (with W = 234.363 mm) and create the artwork for laser engraving/vinyl wrap as it would be on a corresponding plane surface; for artwork that is to go all the way round the glass and be continuous so you can turn the glass round with no interruption, place/adapt the artwork sideways so it is uncomplicated (maybe with one of the gaps if any) where the ends meet (literally); keep the original and work on a copy;

4) Repeat 2), only for the rectangle with artwork from 3), then engrave/place vinyl wrap on the glass.

 

Using the circumference at the middle for the original plane artwork will ensure the least possible/noticeable distortion, the upper half gradually widening upwards and the lower half gradually narrowing downwards corresponding to the shape of the glass which will also prevent/reduce the perception of distortion, and the overall appearance as close to the original as possible.

 

The ultimate comparison is between the plane original from 3) and the engraving/warped copy on the actual conical surface of the glass, but you can also compare the warped copy from 4) to the original from 3), either side by side or over and under or (preferably) in a pattern where each instance of one is surrounded by instances of the other (Effect>Distort & Transform>Transform used twice being your friend).

 

You can also use the latter comparison underway if you wish to work on a possible change/adaptation of the design, within the limits of its fitting into a conitinuous design all the way round the glass.

 

 

In connexion with a single engraving/design that is much smaller/narrower than the whole glass surface, and with repeated identical/different instances possibly in a pattern, you may also consider no (or less) warping of the original.

 

In such cases you can place the original plane (or less warped) artwork instance(s) on the warped rectangle from 2), the adaptation for for repeated instances consisting of different angles and/or distances and/or sizes.

 

 

Obviously, the sufficiently accurate fit established in 1) - 2) is crucial, but once establiched you can reuse it for whichever artwork that fits the full wrap, as well as for any smaller artwork.

 

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New Here ,
Apr 26, 2022 Apr 26, 2022

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Hi Jacob,

Thank you for this explanation, however I do have a question. In the example above, where do the values of w=197.807 mm and Bend = 16% in Step 2 come from?  I am trying to follow along through this example using a cone of different dimensions, but I am not sure how to calculate what (or why) I am changing the width in Step 2, as well as how to calculate what percentage to choose for the bend?

Thank you!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 27, 2022 Apr 27, 2022

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adattelbaum,

 

As you can see from the posts here and in this thread,

https://community.adobe.com/t5/illustrator-discussions/label-for-conical-shape-container/td-p/119098...

 

there are different (other) ways which (also) ought to work, and as mentioned the Warp>Arc way is still a work in pogress.

 

Have you tried the Envelope Distort with Mesh way/plugin?

 

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