Confused on acceptable Fonts to use in InDesign 2022

Explorer ,
Nov 04, 2021 Nov 04, 2021

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Please excuse our naivety but we are getting a little bit confused and it's not easy trying to locate the correct answers, so we are hoping to get some clear and concise answers/info (without spending hours and hours of wasted time surfing the web).

 

Adobe has said "Type 1 fonts will no longer be supported starting 2023". We use Myriad Pro in a lot of our documents (of which we get the message "Your document contains 9 Type 1 Fonts") and I am seeing conflicting information (on the web and in chat forums) on whether Myriad Pro is a Type 1 font and therefore needs to be replaced.

  • Question 1: Type 1 Fonts (I've also seen it as OpenType Type 1) need to be replaced with OpenType TrueType Fonts?
  • Question 2: Is there a suggestion for a OpenType TrueType Font to use in place of Myraid Pro that meets within Adobe standards of it not being a Type 1 Font?
  • Question 3: Where is a list that tells us exactly what fonts are Type 1? (therefore, knowing which fonts to avoid using with Adobe products).
  • Question 4: Where is a list that tells us what fonts are OpenType TrueType fonts? (therefore, knowing which fonts we can use properly within Adobe products).

Any advice/help is appreicated.
Thank You

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How to , Print , Type

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correct answers 3 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Nov 04, 2021 Nov 04, 2021
If the name of a type face ends with “Pro” or “Std”, you can be sure that it is a OpentType font, not a Type 1. Type 1 are PostScript fonts. In InDesign, if you see this icon (the O) it is an OTF font if the icon is a “a” it is a PostScript font (a Type 1) and a TT icon means TrueType…

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Explorer , Nov 04, 2021 Nov 04, 2021
Hi ChrisG66, What I have been able to figure out based on the info in this conversation (mostly from jmlevy), look at your font list: If your font has an icon "O" it's OTF OpenType Font If your font has an icon "TT" it's a TrueType Font If your font has an icon "cloud with a checkmark" it means it comes from Adobe Fonts (pretty sure it makes it OpenType) If your font has an icon "O with VAR on top of it" it means variable font allows the user to create its own weights and widths (pretty sure it ...

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Adobe Community Professional , Nov 04, 2021 Nov 04, 2021
if anybody has anything to add or correct please do so. Thank You. By @Peabody Engineering
Yes, a slight correction. The TTF (TT) file format can be either old TrueType coding or new TrueType coding which is a form of OpenType. In 2000, the computer industry standardized on one font technology — OpenType which is based on the Unicode system. But before then, we had 2 competing types of fonts: PostScript/Type1 and TrueType. Today, there are 3 "flavors" of OpenType fonts: Those based on...

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Explorer ,
Jan 28, 2022 Jan 28, 2022

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Thank you so much for this suggestion, David! But now the plot thickens...

 

I've been getting the blue bar for months saying there are 93 Type 1 fonts in my document (a quarterly publication). But of course, the find/change font box shows every font is TT, O or activated Adobe Cloud fonts. (One of these fonts happens to be Myriad Pro-Open Type, not from the Cloud). It also says there are ZERO fonts in graphics.


HOWEVER, when I preflight the document for Type 1 fonts, it finds 27 instances in 13 seperate placed vector infographics (either AIs or Illustrator PDFs). Most of the offending fonts are Myriad Pro; of the rest, all but one are Adobe Cloud fonts.


When I opened one of the PDF infographics in Acrobat, it says Source Sans Variable is an embedded Type 1 font. But if I open the same file in Illustrator, it says it's an Open Type/Variable font.


ITC Stone Sans is used extensively in this publication. InDesign says it's an Open Type font. But when I export the file to a print PDF, all instances of Stone are listed as Type 1 fonts.


In Windows 10 font preview, ITC Stone Sans is described as: Open Type Layout, Postscript Outlines.
Myriad Pro is describe as: Open Type Layout, Digitally Signed, Postscript Outlines. Same for Source Sans Variable.


I don't know what this all means, but maybe it will provide some clues in the mystery of how InDesign is identifying font problems.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 08, 2021 Nov 08, 2021

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Peabody Engineering said:
"When we went to look in the Find/Replace Font, it showed Type 1 Fonts: 9 and they where all our Myriad Pro Fonts."

 

Hm. That should be not the case. I think, the Type 1 messenger is showing the Find/Replace Font panel only; it is not marking the fonts in question. Your personal interpretation was that some font styles must be Type 1 fonts.

 

Could you show a screenshot of the Find/Replace Font panel after you clicked the button of the blue messanger bar?

 

Thanks,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 28, 2022 Jan 28, 2022

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Hi hengwen,

the issue with false Type 1 font style warnings should be gone with the next bug-fix of InDesign.

Version 17.1.0.50, that should be out soon to everyone. The roll-out has begun this week…

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

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Explorer ,
Jan 28, 2022 Jan 28, 2022

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So are you saying I don't necessarily need to replace all the fonts in the infographics?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 29, 2022 Jan 29, 2022

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Hi hengwen,

that I cannot tell, because I have no access to your info graphic.

Also note, even if you used old PostScript Type-1-fonts in your Adobe Illustrator file that you placed in InDesign, for now you have no issue at all. Not with the current version of InDesign, not with a previous version.

 

But if you plan to use the info graphic editable in the future without a change in typography it could be wise to substitute the now used PostScript Type-1-fonts with their OpenType counterparts ( if they exist… ) .

Depending on your operating system this could be a wise step as well, because no-one can tell if a future version of Windows or Mac OS will support PostScript Type-1 technology at all. Any update of the operating system can change that.

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

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New Here ,
Jul 25, 2022 Jul 25, 2022

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We have used Upc Lin P 36 font for many years. It is a postscript font. Any idea what would be a good replacement for this?

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 25, 2022 Jul 25, 2022

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You might not need a replacement, Type 1 fonts can be converted to open type using a number of utilities—see this thread:

 

https://community.adobe.com/t5/indesign-discussions/ende-der-unterst%C3%BCtzung-f%C3%BCr-ps-type-1-f...

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New Here ,
Jul 25, 2022 Jul 25, 2022

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Looks like that did the trick. Thanks!

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