• Global community
    • Language:
      • Deutsch
      • English
      • Español
      • Français
      • Português
  • 日本語コミュニティ
    Dedicated community for Japanese speakers
  • 한국 커뮤니티
    Dedicated community for Korean speakers

Do I need to resize images before importing them in Adobe InDesign?

New Here ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi

I will create three different InDesign-templates for print, in different sizes, with the same image placed. The resolution should be 300 dpi and printed on uncoated paper.

My question is if I need to resize and customize the image in photoshop (tiff format), or if I just can place the PSD-file and let Indesign do the resizing in the export to PDF? What is the best solution to get the best quality?

Of course, I prefer to use a PSD and only work with one file, and then just update the link when making changes, instead of always saving new tiffs.

But do I destroy the images by letting Indesign do the job?

Views

1.5K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

can place the PSD-file and let Indesign do the resizing in the export to PDF?

Yes, also the separation if needed.

But keep in mind that Indesign will by default not upsample, only downsample.

So if the image has 100ppi effective Resolution that would not be changed (except possibly in connection with Transparency Flattening).

What is the best solution to get the best quality?

(Theoretically) you should get better results if you scaled the images and re-sharpened them for the individually specific sizes.

In your case that would mean creating three images additional to the original and, quite frankly, I myself quite often find it not worth the effort.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

fridao52166849  wrote

or if I just can place the PSD-file and let Indesign do the resizing in the export to PDF?

But do I destroy the images by letting Indesign do the job?

Hi Frida,

I moved this from Photoshop to InDesign where you will get a better answer.

In InDesign you can drag-place your images to scale them (or scale them other ways). Watch the Links panel for the original ppi and the effective ppi. It’s the effective ppi that counts.

If the effective ppi is too low because you resize an image larger, it’s a problem. If you scale an image smaller and the ppi is high, you can take care of it in your pdf or print settings and pull it back down to 300 pixels per inch (ppi).

Jane

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Watch the Links panel for the original ppi and the effective ppi. It’s the effective ppi that counts.

Foe a selected image the Information Panel also displays the information.

And with an appropriate preflight profile (created with the Preflight Panel) one can check all the images (and other elements) in an indd-file for resolution and other parameters.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for your answers!

I came up with one more problem regarding the sharpness of the pictures.

Since sharpness should be added to each individual size, how can I add sharpness after the PDF-export?
I read about LinkOptimizer and Elpical Claro, but is there any other solution / program to use?

Thanks for the help!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Since sharpness should be added to each individual size, how can I add sharpness after the PDF-export?

»Should« is relative here, you do not have to sharpen the images if you are satisfied with the current results.

As »the PDF-export« usually/often includes converting the images to a CMYK target space and saving them as jpgs the images included in the PDF should ideally not to be edited anymore. (The sprint-shop may re-separate with a stronger GCR to reduce print costs, but that is not up to you.)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Since sharpness should be added to each individual size, how can I add sharpness after the PDF-export?

I read about LinkOptimizer and Elpical Claro, but is there any other solution / program to use?

If you want to be that fussy about sharpening you could consider turning off down sampling in the PDF Compression tab. I’m skeptical that a well sharpened original would need additional sharpening after an export without a down sample, so I would proof some PDF output comparisons to see if it is in fact a problem.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Enfocus PitStop Pro or Server would be my choice for sharpening within a PDF. A less productive approach would be to touch up/edit critical images in Photoshop by opening the image using Acrobat Pro.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

If the images within the pdf have been subjected to jpg-compression I would deem that a less than optimal approach.

So if further editing is wanted one shouid create the pdf accordingly.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Download the images and compare in Photoshop...

Starting from a sharpened 300ppi original that I was “happy with”… Then placed into InDesign and scaled 50% for a 600ppi effective resolution, resampled to 300ppi on export:

600ppi-effective-resampled-to-300ppi.jpg

Compared to an image that has been resized in Photoshop to 50% size and then sharpened to account for the softness introduced by resampling:

final-sized-sharpened-300ppi.jpg

Compared to using Enfocus PitStop Pro to sharpen the first image that was placed into InDesign and scaled 50% for a 600ppi effective resolution before resampling to 300ppi:

pitstop-pro-usm-on-300ppi-resampled.jpg

It is undeniable that the first image resampled to 300ppi on export to PDF from InDesign is softer than the other two images. However looking at the second and third image, they are comparable.

So for me, the most productive result is to resample on export and then use PitStop to sharpen the resampled images to account for the softness introduced by resampling down from a higher effective resolution.

Of course it is not as easy to test the above compared to not resampling and simply passing on the higher effective resolution to the RIP. Just as PDF exports and the old Distiller defaulted to resample images above a certain effective PPI value, many service providers workflow software and RIPs do the same… So even if you don’t resample and soften your sharp image.

From tests performed years ago, if memory serves correct the result of higher than necessary effective resolution on contone photographic image quality (not lineart) compared to the above examples is approximately similar to running a Gaussian blur on the image at an approximate setting of 0.3-0.5px (very minor softening).

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

A current trend of thinking reasons that you should use the least-altered highest-pixel-count original image file (I prefer PSD, too) and place it in the InDesign document and scale it. That way, when you get to final steps of Export to PDF, the PDF-maker gets to pull from an original quality image to make its internal image in the PDF.

That is different from an older-school thinking that had us make the PSD the correct size and pixel count (300 ppi) prior to placing into InDesign.

The idea above is to provide the PDF rip the originalest, least-altered-est image to make the PDF from. I think that for a lot of bread-and-butter printing, either viewpoint can make a quality outcome.

Mike Witherell

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The idea above is to provide the PDF rip the originalest, least-altered-est image to make the PDF from. I think that for a lot of bread-and-butter printing, either viewpoint can make a quality outcome.

I personally do not always scale the images I place in Indesign to output size in Photoshop, far from it.

As fas as I can tell Indesign resamples with the method Bicubic but Photoshop’s Bicubic Automatic may provide somewhat crisper results when downsampling.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Since sharpness should be added to each individual size, how can I add sharpness after the PDF-export?

I read about LinkOptimizer and Elpical Claro, but is there any other solution / program to use?

And with super fast RIPs and storage running at less than 20 cents a GB, sampling down at export can be penny wise

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Nov 17, 2022 Nov 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

This is very helpful and exactly the explanation (of the evolution of thought) I was looking for. And it also will happen to save me time. Hurray!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Guru ,
Apr 02, 2019 Apr 02, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I just place my .psd in the layout and let indesign handle compression

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines