Lightroom export issue - image lighter and less contrast on export

New Here ,
Oct 05, 2019 Oct 05, 2019

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Compare - as is with luminocity.PNGexport settings.PNGlightroom issue.PNGno luminocity -sharpen.PNGperformance settings.PNGlightroom issue.PNG

 

 

THe above two images show the difference in the export. the Left is my edit and the Right is the image that was exported.

i am editing in Adobe RGB and exporting to sRGB. the settings i have tried are, with LR version 8.4.1, 8.4.0, 8.3.0 . i have viewed the image in the native windows 10 viewer, google drive viewer, and iphone image viewer. i have never had this happen to my exports before, nor have i had an issue with colours. the image above is a screen grab which shows that it is not the result of my vision on the screen or the calibration of the screen. this is the output raw from the machine.

 

EDIT:

Ive added more information via screen shots. the far left images are from a proper image viewer that sees the colour calibration, the middle is windows viewer, and the right is lightroom. you can still see a difference between each image.

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Community Expert ,
Oct 06, 2019 Oct 06, 2019

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I am making the unsafe assumption that your monitor has been calibrated.

To get the exported images to look like they do in LR, the photo viewer program needs to be color managed. Unfortunately, the default photo app in Windows is not color managed. The Chrome and FireFox web browsers are color managed. Most smart phones are not color managed and tend to have their screen settings by default to be too bright and over saturated.

 

All that said, since this is a b&w image, color management would seem to be not the right place to look...... Hmmm.....

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New Here ,
Oct 06, 2019 Oct 06, 2019

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yes it is calibrated, but that technically shouldnt make a difference as the images look different on the same system but different viewers. if you see i added a colour managed viewer in the mix in my updated post.

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Community Expert ,
Oct 06, 2019 Oct 06, 2019

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The image is in b&w, but color management still applies.

 

No native applications on Windows 10 are color managed, including Photos.

Color managed applications, like Lightroom, use the monitor profile to display images correctly. They do this by converting the image from the document profile to the monitor profile.

Applications without color management do not do this conversion, and will consequently display wrong colors.

 

There are several third party color managed image viewers for Windows. I recommend FastStone, which is free for personal use.

Make sure that color management is enabled under Settings. (both boxes must be checked)

https://www.faststone.org/FSViewerDetail.htm

 

As for web browsers, all the major browsers are now color managed, except Internet Explorer and Edge.

Phones are not color managed, and can not be expected to display correct colors.

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New Here ,
Oct 06, 2019 Oct 06, 2019

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so here is the issue, the client will not have a colour managed viewer on their device, the image looks like crap on their device, im not going to get paid.

 

i did try the viewer youl linked and the image does seem to look more like the LightRoom window.

 

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LEGEND ,
Oct 06, 2019 Oct 06, 2019

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Another observation, the border/background around the images. Image on left gray border/background, image on right black border/background. Edit your image before export , or re-edit the exported image with the same border/background as will be displayed in the published location.

 

I am talking about the color behind the image,

https://havecamerawilltravel.com/lightroom/lightroom-classic-change-color-behind-image/

 

Ahh, this link exoplanes how and why a lot better:

https://youtu.be/tdTxdiC2078

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Community Expert ,
Oct 06, 2019 Oct 06, 2019

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Per's got it right; it's an issue with the other application(s) NOT being color managed or they would match Lightroom when you view the image in Develop module at 1:1 or greater.
Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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Community Expert ,
Oct 07, 2019 Oct 07, 2019

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The three new screenshots look completely identical to me.

If you had done a comparison at 1:1, you might have seen a difference in Photos, but the problem is that Photos won't allow you to view the image at 1:1. (or at any particular magnification)

I suggest that you stop using it, and stick to a color managed viewer.

 

 

so here is the issue, the client will not have a colour managed viewer on their device, the image looks like crap on their device, im not going to get paid.

 

You have no control over how images will display on other people's computers.

But you can tell your client that if they want to see a correct rendering of the image, they have to use a calibrated monitor with color managed software.

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New Here ,
Mar 20, 2022 Mar 20, 2022

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Oh yay. Another unhelpful and patronising reply from an Adobe professional that clearly has no experience of using the software in the real world where people are trying to make a living. Imagine telling your client the image looks poor, but if you get a different device it will look better. 

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Community Expert ,
Mar 20, 2022 Mar 20, 2022

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I am not an Adobe professional, but an Adobe Community professional.

See https://community.adobe.com/t5/using-the-community-discussions/what-does-quot-adobe-community-profes...

I've been using Lightroom for 14 years, and I make a living from it.

If you don't believe me, google my name and take a look at my website.

 

What you refer to as "unhelpful and patronising" is simply a description of the importance of using color managed applications, preferably on a calibrated monitor.

It is not Adobe's fault that people are  using non-color managed software.

This is mostly a Windows problem, since all Mac software is color managed.

The good news is that Windows Photos is now color managed, and it now also allows viewing images at 100%.

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Community Expert ,
Mar 20, 2022 Mar 20, 2022

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LATEST

One thing to realize is that you simply CANNOT control what your clients see. Their displays are simply all over the map. You can however control what the average client user sees. The absolute best you can do is to calibrate your display and NOT trust anything you see in unmanaged applications and only export your images to sRGB. Then only judge your images in managed applications on your monitor and NEVER trust anything you see in an unmanaged app. Unmanaged apps will only be correct if your monitor is exactly sRGB gamut and you have calibrated to the sRGB gamma curve (not typically done). However when calibrated, managed apps will be correct regardless of your monitor's gamut and gamma curve. When you do this, the average viewer will see something that is the same as what you see in a managed application. 

 

The counterintuitive thing for many people is that the average user's display will NOT be like your display in an unmanaged app. It is natural to think that but that is not the case. The average client's display will be closest (taken over 100's of users) to the image displayed on your calibrated display in a managed application. 

 

Lastly, a factor that many people forget about (and that might be at play here) is that sometimes perceived brightness and sharpness are influenced by the scaling algorithm that viewing apps use. There is unfortunately no standard for this and especially with images with lots of noise (e.g. night sky images or high ISO images), you can be fooled by this. This has nothing to do with Lightroom (which uses a quite accurate scaling algorithm) but is simply a consequence of math and how different software developers approach this. The only way to prevent these percceived brighness and sharpness changes is to export to exactly the size in pixels that your image will be viewed at so as to avoid any scaling of the image on the client side. This can be basically impossible to accomplish however.

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