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Biggest advantage / difference between Lightroom and Photoshop

Explorer ,
Oct 25, 2023 Oct 25, 2023

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At the moment I'm toying with the idea of installing Lightroom, although I'm not sure how useful it is for me. Currently, I drag the photos from my SD card to the desired directory, open them in Photoshop and make any desired changes via AdobeCameraRAW. Theoretically that's enough for me, but possibly there are other killer features of Lightroom that I'm just not aware of today 😉
I know that Lightroom offers me the possibility of image management - I wouldn't actually need this as far as I know.
What I do know is that you can load presets in Lightroom. AdobeCameraRAW basically offers me this feature as well, though I don't know if I can load Lightroom presets into AdobeCameraRAW as well, for example.
So, besides file management, what are the strongest arguments for you to use Lightroom that Photoshop / AdobeCameraRAW doesn't offer me?
Thanks in advance for your answers and tips, Ehrich Lehnsherr

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LEGEND ,
Oct 25, 2023 Oct 25, 2023

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It seems as if you have posted in the wrong forum? You are talking about Lightroom and not Lightroom Classic, but this is the Lightroom Classic forum. Questions about Lightroom ought to go in the "Lightroom (ecosystem)" forum.

 

Or are you really talking about Lightroom Classic?

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Explorer ,
Oct 25, 2023 Oct 25, 2023

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…is there any admin who can shift the post, or do I have to delete and repost it!??

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Community Expert ,
Oct 25, 2023 Oct 25, 2023

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Your first step is to understand and identify WHICH VERSION of "Lightroom" you are asking about.

This link explains the difference between the 'new' Lightroom and the 'well established' version that is now called Lightroom-Classic. This link helps explain those differences-

COMPARE LIGHTROOM & LIGHTROOM-CLASSIC FEATURES

You need to decide whether you want your image files stored 'locally on hard-drives' or in the 'Lightroom Cloud' and select the appropriate version of "Lightroom".

 

Now if you are coming from only ever using Photoshop, and possibly Adobe Bridge (or simply a file browser), then this youtube link below makes a comparison between using Bridge (or file browser) and a  Lightroom (database) system.  *NOTE: This video was recorded before a name change to Lightroom-Classic, so all references to "Lightroom" in the video should now be applied to "Lightroom-Classic".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tp2AThZiaBY

 

 

Regards. My System: Lightroom-Classic 13.2 Photoshop 25.5, ACR 16.2, Lightroom 7.2, Lr-iOS 9.0.1, Bridge 14.0.2, Windows-11.

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Explorer ,
Jan 13, 2024 Jan 13, 2024

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thank you, but in the video of Julieanne Kost is talking about lightroom and bridge. But I dont think about to use Bridge.

I am just asking myself, wihich of both versions of Lightroom is the right one for me.
I am user which didn´t use lightlroom before – I drag the foto-files which are worth it from the SD-Card on my NAS and work on them with Photoshop and the Camera Raw Extension. My Sister also has access to those files and she also retouches the images and we both store them later locally. So I guess our choice should be the classic version – not the cloud-based.
BUT – if we are one a photoshooting outside and want to check, if the images are really sharp, we just dont want to check it on a zoomed in camera-display but on our iPad Pro.
So my question is now, if I connect the camera to the iPad and activate the tethering-function, which version of Lightroom would be the right one for me?
Actually I want all the files still stored on our NAS for a later retouching. Everything – the database-files should be stored on or local NAS. Is LightroomClassic the right version for our needs?
And how do the both versions of LightroomClassic do “communicate”?

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Community Expert ,
Jan 13, 2024 Jan 13, 2024

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Lightroom-Classic is the app that runs on a PC or Mac and stores your imported files on a local drive (incl. NAS). It does not run on Mobile devices.

On an iPad (Mobile devices) only Lightroom (Cloud centric version) is available.

 

So to use both apps you need the Photography Plan which only has 20GB of storage (unless you pay for 1TB extra). Importing your camera photos to the iPad, so as to "view" them, will fill your 20GB storage very fast if you shoot professionally. That is a limitation that requires careful management (and deletion) of files in the Lightroom Cloud.

 

Also consider Lightroom on the iPad does not have a "tether" function (if you mean immediate camera to iPad). You can however "Import" the image files to the Lightroom catalog on the iPad.

Your Cloud photos can also be automatically 'synced' down to Lightroom-Classic and stored in a folder nominated in the Preferences.

ScreenShot072.jpg

 

 

Regards. My System: Lightroom-Classic 13.2 Photoshop 25.5, ACR 16.2, Lightroom 7.2, Lr-iOS 9.0.1, Bridge 14.0.2, Windows-11.

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Explorer ,
Jan 16, 2024 Jan 16, 2024

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Hey Rob, thank you for your statement. The usage of my iPad would be only for tethering, maybe there is another software, with wich I can proceed this, like smart shooter. But as I know so far, smart shooter isn´t available for an iPad…
The fotos don´t have to be accessible from my iPad.  Would you still suggest Lightroom as the right version for my usage?

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Explorer ,
Jan 16, 2024 Jan 16, 2024

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after a new research, I will try cascable for tethering and Lightroom Classic for editing and organizing my images…

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Community Expert ,
Jan 16, 2024 Jan 16, 2024

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after a new research, I will try cascable for tethering and Lightroom Classic for editing and organizing my images…

By @Markus Kleine

 

Sounds good, because no Adobe app on mobile does tethered shooting as far as I know. If I do wireless tethering with iPhone/iPad, it’s either with Cascable or the camera manufacturer’s app.

 

Regarding the desktop apps, in case it helps your final decision:

 

If you also want to do tethered shooting on the desktop, and manage originals locally with the help of the organizational features in a catalog, and you want to print, then use Lightroom Classic.

 

If you don’t need tethered shooting on the desktop, and want to upload all originals to the cloud and manage them there, then use Lightroom. Lightroom does have a new Local tab for browsing and editing originals in local folders, storing edits in XMP sidecar files, and that will work about as well as using Camera Raw, so maybe you’d be happy with that. But keep in mind that Lightroom Local mode cannot take advantage of many features in Lightroom that are cloud-managed, such as version control and virtual organization (albums).

quote

if we are one a photoshooting outside and want to check, if the images are really sharp, we just dont want to check it on a zoomed in camera-display but on our iPad Pro.

By @Markus Kleine

 

If you are using Cascable, you can review each captured image in the app. Captured images are stored to the apps’s own private storage on iPad by default. You can define other storage locations and have Cascable automatically copy photos there, using its Storage Link feature. For example, you can have Cascable use Storage Link to copy captured images to an external SSD connected to the iPad USB-C port. Later, you connect that SSD to a Mac or PC, and copy the images to your NAS. Then have Lightroom Classic import the new images at the NAS without moving them (using the Import/Add or Synchronize options). The catalog remembers the images at that path. You might need to test all of that, but I think it would work.

 

Lightroom Classic can catalog images on an NAS, but the catalog itself cannot be stored on an NAS, only on DAS (direct attached storage) or internal volumes.

 

Important note: Lightroom on iOS has a new Device tab, but unfortunately it doesn’t work as well as the Local tab in desktop Lightroom. It can browse only the device photo library; it cannot browse photos in a folder in the iOS Files app (I wish it could), which is the iOS equivalent of a computer desktop folder hierarchy. For this reason, I do not think it’s practical to use Lightroom on iOS to do quick review of images captured by tethered shooting on that device, because it will try to upload them to Lightroom Photos in the Adobe cloud.

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Explorer ,
Jan 18, 2024 Jan 18, 2024

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Hey Conrad, thank you very much for your detailed answer and your invested time for helping me. Really, thank you!!
Right now, my thoughts are, that I only want to check, if the photos me or my sister has shooten in the studio are sharp. So I leave them on my camera sd-card and copy them after shooting onto my NAS.

But your hint concerning the DAS unsettles me a little bit. Sure, my computer hast got a DAS, but I dont do safety-copies of my mac and the same for my sisters mac. We just work on the NAS, which surely has got safety-copies. And what is, if I sell the computer? Than I have to remind those annoying catalog-files from Lightroom classic? Is this what Adobe thinks is an appropriate usage!?? Sounds bit strange 2 me…
Or is this fact just the exclusion for LightroomClassic and I should use Lightroom?

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Community Expert ,
Jan 18, 2024 Jan 18, 2024

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But your hint concerning the DAS unsettles me a little bit. Sure, my computer hast got a DAS, but I dont do safety-copies of my mac and the same for my sisters mac. We just work on the NAS, which surely has got safety-copies. And what is, if I sell the computer? Than I have to remind those annoying catalog-files from Lightroom classic? Is this what Adobe thinks is an appropriate usage!?? Sounds bit strange 2 me…
Or is this fact just the exclusion for LightroomClassic and I should use Lightroom?

By @Markus Kleine

 

When you sell the computer, if it’s a Mac, then the standard procedure is to use Apple Migration Assistant to easily transfer all of your account information and data to the new Mac. This is very easy and works well, and it means when you start the new Mac, it works as your old Mac did, with the data in the same place. A Lightroom Classic catalog folder on internal storage would naturally be included, and just go along for the ride with everything else. No extra work. If you store the catalog folder on DAS, then the only change is that you now connect the DAS to the new Mac, and everything is there.

 

The reason Apple provides Migration Assistant is the issue of storage on computer is not unique to Lightroom Classic. For many apps, a lot of your data must be on the computer and it’s difficult to make some of them work with external storage. For example, if the Apple Photos or Apple Music content is too large for Mac internal storage, there is a way to store their content on external storage, but it causes complications. But also, any of your system and account settings are on that Mac, so there needs to be an easy way to transfer them to a newer Mac, and Migration Assistant is that way.

 

If you wanted to sell the Mac first, then you could make an Apple Time Machine backup of it, sell the Mac, buy the new Mac, and then have Migration Assistant set up the new Mac from the Time Machine backup. If the Lightroom Classic catalog was on internal storage and therefore included in the backup, it will be there in the backup and migrated to the new Mac.

 

quoteOr is this fact just the exclusion for LightroomClassic and I should use Lightroom?
By @Markus Kleine

 

It depends on what you do with those shoots:

 

Lightroom Classic will catalog images, store edits in the catalog, and build previews, you can store the original photos on internal storage, external DAS, or external NAS storage, and store the catalog on internal storage or external DAS.

 

Lightroom was originally only cloud-based, but recently added local edit capability, so it now has two modes now, Local and Cloud. Any images imported in Cloud mode are uploaded with edits also stored in the cloud, and those cloud originals are completely unconnected from your local file system, so in Cloud mode the NAS cannot be involved. So if you were to use Lightroom, you would use Local mode, which is a local file browser similar to Adobe Bridge + Adobe Camera Raw: There is no catalog, edits are stored in sidecar XMP files, and the only organization is the local folder hierarchy. In theory you could use Local mode to browse the NAS and edit images there. But Lightroom currently lacks many of the features in Lightroom Classic and Bridge/Camera Raw, such as advanced metadata filtering, advanced settings copy/paste, and advanced batch exporting. And some Lightroom features work only for cloud-synced images, not local. So you might prefer Lightroom Classic (or Bridge + Camera Raw if you really don’t need many of the cataloging features).

 

quote

Right now, my thoughts are, that I only want to check, if the photos me or my sister has shooten in the studio are sharp. So I leave them on my camera sd-card and copy them after shooting onto my NAS.

By @Markus Kleine

 

For that workflow, I think you might simply use the image review built into Cascable. It can be set to automatic, so that the review window appears immediately after each shot.

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Explorer ,
Jan 19, 2024 Jan 19, 2024

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quote

But your hint concerning the DAS unsettles me a little bit. Sure, my computer hast got a DAS, but I dont do safety-copies of my mac and the same for my sisters mac. We just work on the NAS, which surely has got safety-copies. And what is, if I sell the computer? Than I have to remind those annoying catalog-files from Lightroom classic? Is this what Adobe thinks is an appropriate usage!?? Sounds bit strange 2 me…
Or is this fact just the exclusion for LightroomClassic and I should use Lightroom?

By @Markus Kleine

 

When you sell the computer, if it’s a Mac, then the standard procedure is to use Apple Migration Assistant to easily transfer all of your account information and data to the new Mac. This is very easy and works well, and it means when you start the new Mac, it works as your old Mac did, with the data in the same place. A Lightroom Classic catalog folder on internal storage would naturally be included, and just go along for the ride with everything else. No extra work. If you store the catalog folder on DAS, then the only change is that you now connect the DAS to the new Mac, and everything is there.

 

The reason Apple provides Migration Assistant is the issue of storage on computer is not unique to Lightroom Classic. For many apps, a lot of your data must be on the computer and it’s difficult to make some of them work with external storage. For example, if the Apple Photos or Apple Music content is too large for Mac internal storage, there is a way to store their content on external storage, but it causes complications. But also, any of your system and account settings are on that Mac, so there needs to be an easy way to transfer them to a newer Mac, and Migration Assistant is that way.

 

If you wanted to sell the Mac first, then you could make an Apple Time Machine backup of it, sell the Mac, buy the new Mac, and then have Migration Assistant set up the new Mac from the Time Machine backup. If the Lightroom Classic catalog was on internal storage and therefore included in the backup, it will be there in the backup and migrated to the new Mac.

 

quoteOr is this fact just the exclusion for LightroomClassic and I should use Lightroom?
By @Markus Kleine

 

It depends on what you do with those shoots:

 

Lightroom Classic will catalog images, store edits in the catalog, and build previews, you can store the original photos on internal storage, external DAS, or external NAS storage, and store the catalog on internal storage or external DAS.

 

Lightroom was originally only cloud-based, but recently added local edit capability, so it now has two modes now, Local and Cloud. Any images imported in Cloud mode are uploaded with edits also stored in the cloud, and those cloud originals are completely unconnected from your local file system, so in Cloud mode the NAS cannot be involved. So if you were to use Lightroom, you would use Local mode, which is a local file browser similar to Adobe Bridge + Adobe Camera Raw: There is no catalog, edits are stored in sidecar XMP files, and the only organization is the local folder hierarchy. In theory you could use Local mode to browse the NAS and edit images there. But Lightroom currently lacks many of the features in Lightroom Classic and Bridge/Camera Raw, such as advanced metadata filtering, advanced settings copy/paste, and advanced batch exporting. And some Lightroom features work only for cloud-synced images, not local. So you might prefer Lightroom Classic (or Bridge + Camera Raw if you really don’t need many of the cataloging features).

 

quote

Right now, my thoughts are, that I only want to check, if the photos me or my sister has shooten in the studio are sharp. So I leave them on my camera sd-card and copy them after shooting onto my NAS.

By @Markus Kleine

 

For that workflow, I think you might simply use the image review built into Cascable. It can be set to automatic, so that the review window appears immediately after each shot.

By @Conrad C

yes - I will exactly work this way…

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Explorer ,
Jan 19, 2024 Jan 19, 2024

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Lightroom was originally only cloud-based, but recently added local edit capability, so it now has two modes now, Local and Cloud. Any images imported in Cloud mode are uploaded with edits also stored in the cloud, and those cloud originals are completely unconnected from your local file system, so in Cloud mode the NAS cannot be involved. So if you were to use Lightroom, you would use Local mode, which is a local file browser similar to Adobe Bridge + Adobe Camera Raw: There is no catalog, edits are stored in sidecar XMP files, and the only organization is the local folder hierarchy. In theory you could use Local mode to browse the NAS and edit images there. But Lightroom currently lacks many of the features in Lightroom Classic and Bridge/Camera Raw, such as advanced metadata filtering, advanced settings copy/paste, and advanced batch exporting. And some Lightroom features work only for cloud-synced images, not local. So you might prefer Lightroom Classic (or Bridge + Camera Raw if you really don’t need many of the cataloging features).

 

I really would like to try Lightroom and use new presets and many other new advantages. Maybe I don´t think to open minded for this new programm and/or maybe I just dont get through the whole system. But what is, if my sister also wants to work on those images I have downloaded to our NAS - in my understanding she doesn´t has access to the catalog I have created, because it is on the HD of my computer, not!??

 
 

 

 

 
 

 

 

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Community Expert ,
Jan 19, 2024 Jan 19, 2024

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quoteI really would like to try Lightroom and use new presets and many other new advantages. Maybe I don´t think to open minded for this new programm and/or maybe I just dont get through the whole system. But what is, if my sister also wants to work on those images I have downloaded to our NAS - in my understanding she doesn´t has access to the catalog I have created, because it is on the HD of my computer, not!??
By @Markus Kleine

 

If your primary interest is in the latest presets and features, while preserving multi-user local NAS access to both photos and the edits to those photos, then actually it sounds like you should stay with the latest versions of Bridge and Camera Raw. Adobe keeps Camera Raw and Lightroom at feature parity most of the time, they usually get new features simultaneously, so you are not missing out. Camera Raw keeps edits in the same folder as the image, so whoever opens the file there sees the previous edits.

 

But the Lightroom Classic catalog cannot be stored on the NAS.

 

The features you are missing by using Bridge and Camera Raw instead of Lightroom Classic are mostly organizational. For image edits, the main feature missing in Camera Raw is that Lightroom Classic keeps full edit history across sessions so you can roll back to any step all the way to the beginning.

 

Some of the reasons I like working in Lightroom Classic are the Secondary Display window, where I can keep Grid and Survey views for immediate access and reference, much better metadata handling, and being able to print without changing applications. But it doesn’t seem worth it to lose multi-user NAS access to get those features.

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Explorer ,
Jan 21, 2024 Jan 21, 2024

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LATEST

I have to admit that this is a little sobering, because I was looking forward to learning something new with Lightroom. When I look at all the photographer videos, it seems to me that every professional uses Lightroom or (CaptureOne ;-)).
However - I'll buy the Cascable-App from CaptureOne now and Adobe is out of luck...
Honestly - like I already wrote, maybe I dont understand the whole usage of Lightroom. But are my requirements so different/special, like nobody others, that Adobe doesn´t have a solution for users like me?

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