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a question when using luminosity blending mode, it presents different results in 16 bits and 32 bits

New Here ,
Apr 29, 2024 Apr 29, 2024

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(sorry I didn't learn English well please pardon my English ;w;)

This is my layer 1 and 2:

CrystalStar35019217g01h_0-1714403917386.png

CrystalStar35019217g01h_1-1714403934041.png

(This painting is from Pixiv, not mine)

In 16 bits mode I tried to use luminosity mode in this layer to create an effect, but it turned out to be like:

CrystalStar35019217g01h_2-1714404102704.png

but when I switch to 32 bits mode, it looks much better:

CrystalStar35019217g01h_3-1714404180604.png

I'm trying to figure out why this is the case. What are the possible reasons that could have caused this?

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Community Expert , Apr 29, 2024 Apr 29, 2024

The 16 bit example you show is the correct and expected result with Luminosity blend mode.

 

32 bits per channel is linear gamma floating point data, capable of containing data above the white point and below the black point of a normal gamma encoded image. As such, luminosity blend mode doesn't really apply (or will give you a non-intuitive or unexpected result).

 

If the bottom example is what you want, don't use Luminosity blend mode.

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Community Expert ,
Apr 29, 2024 Apr 29, 2024

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The 16 bit example you show is the correct and expected result with Luminosity blend mode.

 

32 bits per channel is linear gamma floating point data, capable of containing data above the white point and below the black point of a normal gamma encoded image. As such, luminosity blend mode doesn't really apply (or will give you a non-intuitive or unexpected result).

 

If the bottom example is what you want, don't use Luminosity blend mode.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 29, 2024 Apr 29, 2024

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OP, you may want to look at this Adobe article explaining blend modes.

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/blending-modes.html

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New Here ,
May 05, 2024 May 05, 2024

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Thanks! That's very useful.

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New Here ,
May 05, 2024 May 05, 2024

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Thanks for your help!

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