How do you "reset" your eyes

Engaged ,
Aug 04, 2022 Aug 04, 2022

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How do you "reset" your eyes as in if you look at certain colors for too long it can make the colors look "different". Also, looking at the colors on different devices Also changes the colors. 😞

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 04, 2022 Aug 04, 2022

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Ensure the background to your workspace is neutral (I use a light colour theme for the tools and panels and a 50% grey background to the workspace).

Visual adaptation to colour and exposure occurs remarkably quickly and when adjusting images I like to have one or two reference images available that I can use for comparison and to 'reset' my eyes.

Finally, use tools such as the histogram which will give a graphical indication of under/over exposure.

 

You mention that looking at colours on different devices changes the colours. You can limit that with proper colour management e.g. making sure that all monitors are profiled and you only use colour managed applications (including Photoshop) for viewing. There will be some difference when printing, as the dynamic range and gamut of ink on paper is different to screen, but even that difference can be limited by calibrating the monitor to visually match paper white under the chose viewing condition and using 'proof colours' to preview using the printer profile.

 

Dave

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 04, 2022 Aug 04, 2022

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First of all, buy a calibrator like an i1 Display Pro or similar. Any serious Photoshop user will have one.

 

Aside from that, I'd recommend a light interface in Photoshop, not the dark one that is default now. A light interface gives the eye a visual reference to judge colors against. The dark interface removes all references.

 

Another thing to watch out for is screen brightness. This is normally a part of the calibration procedure, but you can do it in the monitor's OSD controls. Monitor white should be - this is roughly speaking just to point you in the right direction - just like looking at a white sheet of paper. In most normal cases, this corresponds to a brightness of around 120 cd/m².

 

Edit - cross post, but we're basically saying the same thing

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 05, 2022 Aug 05, 2022

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To set your eyes grey balance emsure that you are using a neutral great desktop background, also grey is better in Photoshop than black. 

And definitely calibrate your display [with a plug in screen sensor, a colorimeter like the X-Rite i1 Display Pro (called 'Calibrite' in some territories]

 

I hope this helps
neil barstow, colourmanagement net :: adobe forum volunteer:: co-author: 'getting colour right'
google me "neil barstow colourmanagement" for lots of free articles on colour management

 

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 06, 2022 Aug 06, 2022

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you can only trust the numbers…

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 06, 2022 Aug 06, 2022

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@didiermazier wrote:

you can only trust the numbers…


Yup, when in Lab.... 

The other simple thing to do; is close your eyes for a few seconds. 


Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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Enthusiast ,
Aug 06, 2022 Aug 06, 2022

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Also useful...
- keeping a reference image open.

- if you don't compare to variations, you might be shocked how much better someone else's version could look.

- some retouchers use a half-inch white border to better judge some aspects (don't retouch on a fully white background though)

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 06, 2022 Aug 06, 2022

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Just to add with all the great advice: definitely have a gray surface to look at and rest your eyes. Go back and look at the image later - a second look with some time between really helps. When color correcting, the faster you can correct, the better. Your eyes adjust quickly. This was really stressed, when I worked in a pro color lab, back in the film days. The folds who used the Video Color Negative Analysers, had to make the corrections very quickly so they're eyes didn't shift too much. We also had a know reference print that helped guage skin tones - it would be really nice if ACR allowed this.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 06, 2022 Aug 06, 2022

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@AntDX316 

 

You could try the following script. I created it more for practice than anything – however, it may also serve a practical use too!

 

It adds a "visual reset" mid-grey layer above all other layers in the stack, then removes it 3 seconds later. The previously selected layer and overall layer stack visibility should be restored without change.

 

Set a keyboard shortcut against the installed script for easy access. It has not been exhaustively tested, so use it with all due caution (I have added a single history step undo if the script doesn't play nice with your layer structure).

 

/*
Visual Reset.jsx
v1.0, 7th August 2022, Stephen Marsh
https://community.adobe.com/t5/photoshop-ecosystem-discussions/how-do-you-quot-reset-quot-your-eyes/td-p/13114189
*/

#target photoshop

function main() {

	// Set the original layer
	var origLayer = activeDocument.activeLayer;

	// Store the original layer visibility
	toggleActiveLayerVisibility(true);

	// Select the top layer
	activeDocument.activeLayer = activeDocument.layers[0];

	// Create the visual reset shield
	dupeLayer();
	activeDocument.activeLayer.name = "Visual Reset";
	executeAction(stringIDToTypeID("newPlacedLayer"), undefined, DialogModes.NO);
	app.runMenuItem(stringIDToTypeID('rasterizePlaced'));
	fillGray();

	// Force the screen redraw for 1 second
	app.refresh();

	// Pause for 2 seconds
	$.sleep(2000);

	// Restore the original layer state
	activeDocument.activeLayer.remove();
	activeDocument.activeLayer = origLayer;
	toggleActiveLayerVisibility(true);


	// Functions

	function dupeLayer() {
		var s2t = function (s) {
			return app.stringIDToTypeID(s);
		};
		var descriptor = new ActionDescriptor();
		var list = new ActionList();
		var reference = new ActionReference();
		reference.putEnumerated(s2t("layer"), s2t("ordinal"), s2t("targetEnum"));
		descriptor.putReference(s2t("null"), reference);
		descriptor.putInteger(s2t("version"), 0);
		descriptor.putList(s2t("ID"), list);
		executeAction(s2t("duplicate"), descriptor, DialogModes.NO);
	}

	function fillGray() {
		var s2t = function (s) {
			return app.stringIDToTypeID(s);
		};
		var descriptor = new ActionDescriptor();
		descriptor.putEnumerated(s2t("using"), s2t("fillContents"), s2t("gray"));
		descriptor.putUnitDouble(s2t("opacity"), s2t("percentUnit"), 100);
		descriptor.putEnumerated(s2t("mode"), s2t("blendMode"), s2t("normal"));
		executeAction(s2t("fill"), descriptor, DialogModes.NO);
	}

	function toggleActiveLayerVisibility(toggleOptionsPalette) {
		var s2t = function (s) {
			return app.stringIDToTypeID(s);
		};
		var descriptor = new ActionDescriptor();
		var list = new ActionList();
		var reference = new ActionReference();
		reference.putEnumerated(s2t("layer"), s2t("ordinal"), s2t("targetEnum"));
		list.putReference(reference);
		descriptor.putList(s2t("null"), list);
		descriptor.putBoolean(s2t("toggleOptionsPalette"), toggleOptionsPalette);
		executeAction(s2t("show"), descriptor, DialogModes.NO);
	}
}

activeDocument.suspendHistory('Visual Reset.jsx', 'main()');

 

https://prepression.blogspot.com/2017/11/downloading-and-installing-adobe-scripts.html

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 07, 2022 Aug 07, 2022

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Maybe this can help.

https://youtu.be/O713uP4thAA

Lee- Graphic Designer, Print Specialist, Photographer
In this Photoshop tutorial, you will learn how to change eye color in Photoshop.You will learn a non-destructive technique using groups, Hue and Saturation A...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 07, 2022 Aug 07, 2022

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Jumpenjax - Nice idea, but that wasn’t the question. Did you read the w question or just the thread title? 

 

"How do you "reset" your eyes as in if you look at certain colors for too long it can make the colors look "different". Also, looking at the colors on different devices Also changes the colors"

 

 

neilB

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 07, 2022 Aug 07, 2022

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Yes, I guess I did. I still am wondering what exactly your asking. Like are you asking for you personally? If so, look away at something white for a few minutes, to let your eyes reset and rest.

Lee- Graphic Designer, Print Specialist, Photographer

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