LONG delay when selecting a found object

New Here ,
Jul 15, 2022 Jul 15, 2022

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I just got Photoshop 2022 (Version 23.4.1).  When I use the object finder, it takes 2-3 minutes to do it's thing.  I'm sort of OK with that as my PC is a few years old.  BUT, when I then go to select one of the found objects the CPU pegs out for just under 3 minutes before the outline appears.  If I then select an additional found object, it does the same thing.  This really isn't usable for me.  I've already changed the history cycles from 50 to 20 and set the cache levels to 6, but can't tell any difference in performance.  Is this normal?  Anything else I can do to fix this?  Thanks for any advice you can give.  My system specs are below:


Processor Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 CPU 860 @ 2.80GHz 2.80 GHz
Installed RAM 12.0 GB
System type 64-bit operating system, x64-based processor
4 cores; 8 logical processors

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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What do you have for a graphics card?

Kevin Stohlmeyer
Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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New Here ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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My card is not super fast nor does it have all that much memory (2 GB).

 

GTX 750 Ti GPU Engine Specs:
640CUDA Cores
1020Base Clock (MHz)
1085Boost Clock (MHz)
GTX 750 Ti Memory Specs:
5.4 GbpsMemory Clock
2048 MBStandard Memory Config
GDDR5Memory Interface
128-bitMemory Interface Width
86.4Memory Bandwidth (GB/sec)
GTX 750 Ti Support:
4.4OpenGL
PCI Express 3.0Bus Support
YesCertified for Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Vista or Windows XP
NVIDIA GameStream, GPU Boost 2.0, 3D Vision, CUDA, PhysX, TXAA, Adaptive VSync, FXAA, NVIDIA Surround, G-SYNC-readySupported Technologies 1
Yes3D Vision Ready
12 APIMicrosoft DirectX
YesBlu Ray 3D
Yes3D Gaming
Yes3D Vision Live (Photos and Videos)

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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That would be another reason to upgrade, with both the processor and graphics card lacking your best option is to either downgrade your PS to a more compatible version or upgrade your hardware to better handle the more intense features.

Kevin Stohlmeyer
Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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While your computer meets the minimum system requirements, it does not mean it will perform as well as a newer system. I would expect lags with doing something as memory intestive as the sensei selection features depending on the canvas/image size of the project. There comes a point where updating PS is going to negatively affect your work with a 13 year old processor.

Kevin Stohlmeyer
Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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New Here ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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Thanks for your comments.  I do understand that my processor is pretty old.  I wouldn't have upgraded except that my Lightroom 6 wouldn't load anymore and I've invested LOTS of time in naming and keywording over 150K photos.  Surprisingly, after subscribing and installing LR Classic, LR 6 would then open again.  I'm not finding any significant difference in functionality between LR 6 and LR Classis, although Classic has bug that 6 didn't have where the text box turns all white (white text on white background so you can't see it) in Classic.  Seems to be related to whether or not side panels are visible.  I'm finding that I can do manual selections in Ps faster than waiting for Sensei.  The part that surprises me the most is that after waiting for the initial finding of objects, it seems to take just a long each time I select one of the found objects.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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This got me curious, because I have also seen long delays with the Object Selection tool/Object Finder at times. My personal impression is that this is one of those features that only showed up in the newest versions of Photoshop because if they had tried to add it more than a few years ago, the best hardware available then would not have run it well. In other words…

 


@GrandyCo wrote:

Is this normal?


 

From what I can tell, it probably is normal.

My brief tests below, after a cold start of Photoshop version 23.4:

 

Computer 1 (MacBook Pro notebook)

Intel Core i5, 4 CPU cores with (weak) Intel integrated graphics, released in 2018 (5 years old)

Object Finder time to recognize: 24 seconds

 

Computer 2 (MacBook Pro notebook)

Apple M1 Pro, 8 CPU cores and 10 GPU cores, released in 2021 (<1 year old)

Object Finder time to recognize: 8 seconds

My guess is that the latest (12th generation) Intel Core CPUs would perform similarly or better; the top of the line Intel processors for notebooks now have 14 CPU cores.

 

So it looks reasonable to assume that the time that Object Finder takes gets a lot closer to zero if the computer is very recent. It is not just that they are newer; they have more. Both Apple Silicon and Intel now include many more CPU and GPU cores than just a few years ago. And, to further accelerate machine learning features, some current processors now include hardware acceleration for machine learning, such as the Apple Neural Engine, or Deep Learning Boost in the latest Intel processors.

 

Given that the 4-core Intel Core i7 860 listed for your system specs was released 13 years ago (2009) if my web search was correct, it seems plausible that Object Finder could take over 2 minutes, based on the 24 seconds I got with my 5-year-old 8th gen Core i5. The Intel Core i7 860 was probably a great performer at the time. But compared to the amount of power available today, it does fall short in terms of CPU cores, GPU processing power, and won’t have any kind of hardware acceleration for machine learning.

 

I wouldn’t mind being wrong about this, but it looks like the performance cure for AI-type features is using hardware that’s quite recent (released after the sharp rise in cores and the addition of machine learning acceleration). That might apply to any advanced machine learning feature you try, such as the scaling in Topaz Gigapixel AI. Do you find similarly long times using the Neural Filters in Photoshop, which also use Sensei machine learning?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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@GrandyCo wrote:

Anything else I can do to fix this?


 

I just thought of a possible way. Can you test this:

 

First, in the options bar for the Object Selection tool, deselect Object Finder so that Photoshop doesn’t need to churn through that.

Now, use the Object Selection tool to drag a rectangle around the object you want. Is Photoshop able to isolate it faster when you give it a smaller area to analyze?

 

If that helps, you might also experiment with the Object Selection Tool in lasso mode (choose Lasso from the Mode menu on the options bar). Although I think Rectangle mode might be easier, because it takes a lot more time to drag a careful lasso selection around an object.

 

In short, try dragging the Object Selection tool around an object, instead of just hovering it.

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New Here ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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Thanks for your comments and research on this!  I tried your suggestion and it still took about 3:35 to "find" a fairly simple object using a rectangle.  However... if I only need to find one object it would be quicker, because when I find all objects (and it takes almost 4 minutes), it takes that long AGAIN when I hover and select a single object before the marching ants outline appears... and that long again if I select an additional object.  That's the part that's really hard for me to understand... almost like it's having to find that each object all over again when I hover and select it.  I do have a newer notebook (i5 7200U @ 2.5Gz) that I don't currently have Ps on, but I might try it some day.  It's still about 7 years old.  Looks like I'll just have to live with the times until I upgrade some day, but I won't upgrade just for this as I can manually select must faster and that'll meet most of my needs as a hobbyist.

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