• Global community
    • Language:
      • Deutsch
      • English
      • Español
      • Français
      • Português
  • 日本語コミュニティ
    Dedicated community for Japanese speakers
  • 한국 커뮤니티
    Dedicated community for Korean speakers

Photoshop referencing wrong monitor profile

Community Beginner ,
Dec 18, 2021 Dec 18, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

 

 

My current and only monitor is an ASUS PA278CV, and it's profile is setup correctly as default in Windows color management per below:

 

Screenshot 2021-12-19 152654.jpg

See below, somehow Photoshop is referencing an old monitor (wide gamut) Dell monitor profile which is causing me all sorts of headaches.  Note, the below is just to show the profile that Photoshop considers the monitor profile (I'm not using this as color space or anything like that).

 

IMG_20211219_145226.jpg

 

I've tried uninstalling Photoshop and it's settings, and re-installing but the issue persists.

 

Note, Windows actually won't let me delete that old monitor profile from the spool.

 

Any suggestions would be most welcome.  Thank you.

TOPICS
Windows

Views

315

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Community Expert , Dec 18, 2021 Dec 18, 2021

Likes

Translate

Translate
Community Expert ,
Dec 18, 2021 Dec 18, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Your monitor profile only needs to be set at the OS level. This is separate from the RGB profile setting in Adobe's color settings workflow. You should not use your monitor profile there, instead pick a nice wide RGB gamut like AdobeRGB.

In your workflow, your monitor is essentially an output device, so the ICC profile assigned to it in your OS translates the information in your documents to display them as best as possible. If you use that profile as your RGB working space, you are actually limiting your gamut. Not what you want

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 18, 2021 Dec 18, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Dec 18, 2021 Dec 18, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

After some exhaustive research (and as alluded to by jazz-y) it turns out that color management is broken in Windows 11.  Color mangaged apps aren't able to reference the monitor profile set in Windows color manangement.  

 

Down-grading to Windows 10 has fixed the issue.  Thanks Microsoft....urgh....

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Dec 18, 2021 Dec 18, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for the reply, however as stated in my post, I'm not using the monitor profile as my color space in PS color settings, the image was just a way to show that PS was not seeing the correct monitor profile.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 19, 2021 Dec 19, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Ah, I get your issue now.

FYI, not that it matters since you've already downgraded back to Win 10, but apparently Microsoft has fixed the issue but has yet to release it, but someone suggested a temporary workaround which is to open “Color Management”, go to the “Advanced” tab and, in “Device profile”, choose your monitor’s device profile there as well. This works only for a one-monitor setup, as it would apply the profile to all connceted monitors. ( I don't have a Win11 system to test this theory myself, however.)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Dec 19, 2021 Dec 19, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks, yep, I had tried that work-around also, but strangely it didn't solve it for me.   I'd noticed it worked for some but not others.  

 

Crazy that Microsoft can break something so fundamental in a major upgrade.  There must be a lot of users out there pulling their hair out, I hope MS is on top of it for future release. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Dec 26, 2021 Dec 26, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 28, 2021 Dec 28, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

good to know, thanks for the info

 


neil barstow, colourmanagement net :: adobe forum volunteer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Nov 02, 2022 Nov 02, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Ugh! Now it seems like Windows 10 is broken in the exact same way. Every inage I view with an Adobe product looks sickly since Windows keeps telling everything that the default profile is the one I made for the wide gamut mode of my Dell display even though I am in the REC709 custom calibration mode now and have the profile for that set in Windows as the default.

 

And every image I view in a web browser that has a color profile associated with it also looks sickly now.

 

The only things that work are programs that let you manually select your monitor's profile, so if I go to force Irfanview to use a specific profile then it works or FastPicViewer works if I tell it what to use.

 

How can Microsoft keep breaking this? Why do they even need to fiddle with whatever code sends out the link to the current default set profile? Why would they even need to change that single line of code? And how can they apparently keep re-breaking it again and again in various OS versions recently?

 

And why in the world does Adobe not let you manually chose a monitor profile like a lot of other special software and force you to be at the whim of the OS??

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Nov 02, 2022 Nov 02, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

How do you change the display from native to the Rec.709 preset? In the monitor's OSD controls, or does the calibration software communicate with the display to do this? If the former, what is the procedure for switching to the corresponding monitor profile? And how is that profile made?

 

It has always worked correctly here on Windows 10, in two different systems, both using wide gamut Eizos. I sometimes switch to sRGB emulation when I need to use non-color managed applications, and that always works correctly too.

 

I've seen some cases here in the forum where this happens, but that has always, no exceptions, been on systems with an integrated display plus an external connected display. Mostly on MBP/iMacs, but also some cases with Windows laptops. There have also been a few cases with BenQ calibration software, known to be pretty buggy.

 

I don't think I have ever heard about this on desktop systems with only connected displays (aside from the quickly fixed Windows 11 problem).

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Nov 02, 2022 Nov 02, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

My Dell has four modes that you can calibrate. A couple have calibrated to two different wide gamut modes and then a couple I have calibrated to REC709-type modes.

 

Using the monitor I have it currently set to a mode that I calibrated the monitor internally to be REC709 with Gamma 2.4.

 

When you calibrate a mode it also makes a monitor profile for that mode.

 

I currently set, under Windows 10, the default profile for the monitor to be the proper one for my monitor in REC709 Gamma 2.4 mode.

 

However, in Photoshop I see that it says Monitor RGB profile is one of the native wide gamut mode profiles which are only supposed to be used when I have it switched over to one of those modes.

 

And I see that any program that uses color management but does not let you manually pick the monitor profile but instead simply asks Windows which monitor profile to use, is getting sent, by Windows 11, the wrong profile, no matter what I do it appears to just be sending the wide gamut profile an dnot the one that actually is now currently set in Windows as the default.

 

So everything in Adobe programs looks sickly and so do any images that have color profiles when viewed in Firefox or Chrome, etc.

 

The same exact problem seems to have happened to the OP here, but in his case, about a year ago and on Windows 11 instead of Windows 10. He appears to have a desktop display with a connected monitor. EDIT: although I see you list that as a Windows 11 problem quickly fixed. So I don't know what to say, but the same problem now seems to have suddenly happened on Windows 10 about a year later. It seemed to happen after I updated adobe apps or maybe after I updated Windows 10.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Nov 02, 2022 Nov 02, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Windows 10 seems to tell all programs that the proper monitor profile to use is a wide gamut one, which makes things look sickly since my monitor is currently set to REC709 gamut, even though I have set the defauly profile in Windows to be the proper REC709 one for my display.

 

Programs that let me manually chose the monitor profile (where I chose the REC709 one) show everything perfectly.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Nov 02, 2022 Nov 02, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

So you're not using a calibrator, just the stock Dell profiles? I wouldn't trust those. You need to have a calibrator, especially with a wide gamut monitor. I usually say they should never be sold without one.

 

When the monitor behavior changes, you need to load the corresponding monitor profile that describes that behavior. How is that done? Do you go into Windows color management to change it manually?

Displayprofile_50_2.png

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Nov 03, 2022 Nov 03, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I am using a calibrator and the special version of i1Profiler for my Dell monitor.

 

Yeah I did just what you did above. It used to work, now it doens't work. I set it to the profile created by doing a calibration with my probe for my REC709 Gamma 2.4 calibration and it shows that it is set to the default as above BUT for some reason programs started acting like the calibration profile I made when I was calibrating a native wide gamut mode is the default.

 

So all the programs like Photoshop/Premiere Pro or Firefox/Chrome that don't let you specifically chose which profile to use keep using the wrong one. In Photoshop I can even see it says Monitor RGB is the wide gamut one. Again even though I have as you show above set it to a totally different profile. It is set in Windows there, it stays set and yet for some reason Windows started telling programs it is one of the wide gamut profiles that I made that is the default.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Nov 03, 2022 Nov 03, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

This is really odd. You have only one display, this isn't a laptop?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Nov 03, 2022 Nov 03, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

"In Photoshop I can even see it says Monitor RGB is the wide gamut one"

 

This would seem to prove your point - that the wrong display profile is being served by Windows to Photoshop. 

 

I wonder if resetting Photoshop might help?

Perhaps try resetting Photoshop preferences?

(read this entire post before acting please)

Resetting restores Photoshop's internal preferences, which are saved when Photoshop closes.

If they become corrupt then various issues can occur.

 

Here’s some info on how to do that:

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/preferences.html

Manually removing preferences files is the most complete method for restoring Photoshop to its default state: 

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/preferences.html#Manually

 

The user Library folder is hidden by default on macOS.

To access files in the hidden user Library folder, see here for how to access hidden user library files.

https://helpx.adobe.com/x-productkb/global/access-hidden-user-library-files.html

 

Unexpected behavior may indicate damaged preferences. Restoring preferences to their default settings is a good idea when trying to troubleshoot unexpected behaviors in Photoshop. check out the video

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/preferences.html#reset_preferences

 

Learn how to access and modify Photoshop preferences and customize per your frequent workflows

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/preferences.html

 

And here’s an earlier forum discussion as an aid to understanding

https://community.adobe.com/t5/photoshop-ecosystem-discussions/quick-tips-how-to-reset-photoshop-pre...

 

You may want to backup your settings and custom presets, brushes & actions before restoring Photoshop's preferences.

Here is general info about that:  https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/preferences.html#BackupPhotoshoppreferences

 

 

Before you reset your preferences

in case of future issues, I suggest you make a copy as Adobe may need one to check problematic references. 

Quit Photoshop.
Go to Photoshop's Preferences folder

Preferences file locations: https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/kb/preference-file-names-locations-photoshop.html\


  [in MacOS see: Users/[user name]/Library/Preferences/Adobe Photoshop [version] Settings

  be aware that the user Library folder is hidden by default on macOS.

  https://helpx.adobe.com/x-productkb/global/access-hidden-user-library-files.html

  In the Finder, open the “Go” menu whilst holding down the Option (Alt) key.

  Library will now appear in the list - below the current user's “home” directory. ]

 

Now you can drag the entire Adobe Photoshop [Version] Settings folder to the desktop or somewhere safe as a back-up of your settings.

 

I hope this helps
neil barstow, colourmanagement net :: adobe forum volunteer:: co-author: 'getting colour right'
google me "neil barstow colourmanagement" for lots of free articles on colour management

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Nov 03, 2022 Nov 03, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks. I'm not sure re-setting Photoshop preferences would fix it since the issue seems to affect other programs.

 

If I tell Irfanview to use default monitor profile it makes images look just like Photoshop and is clearly also being sent the incorrect wide gamut profile. If I manually instruct Irfanview which profile to use then it looks normal. And images in Firefox and Chrome, both now seem to rely on Windows telling them which monitor profile to use when viewing images that have a color profile, also look wrong, just as in Photoshop.

 

And things also look wrong in Premiere Pro, etc. basically anything that depends on Windows to tell it which monitor profile to use, things look wrong.

 

Hmm i just spotted some weird "CalibrationLoader by LOGO" in Windows startup programs and "i1ProfilerTray" let me see if disabling them and rebooting fixes anything. Maybe the new xrite software is using some bugged calibration loader that is secretly constantly forcing the last profile created to be loaded regardless of what is set in the OS? Would be kinda silly since the monitor has multiple modes to switch between so no such loader such ever be bundled with any software that calibrates this monitor. But maybe in some update they bungled it? I'll see what happens.

 

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Nov 03, 2022 Nov 03, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The distinction between calibration and monitor profile can look somewhat blurred in hardware calibrated monitors where the software communicates directly with the monitor - but it's still important to understand (even more so perhaps). Apologies if you know this, but it's important to clearly define the problem.

 

The calibration isn't the problem here. The profile is.

 

Simply put, the monitor profile is description of the monitor in its calibrated state. The profile is just a map, it doesn't adjust anything, it doesn't do anything at all. It just has to describe how the monitor behaves at the moment.

 

This profile is used by Photoshop in a standard profile conversion, just like any other profile conversion, but on the fly, as you work. The profile has to be an accurate map of the actual terrain, that's all it needs to do. And it has to be the right map.

 

Whenever the monitor's behavior changes, by whatever means or method, the current profile is invalidated, and you need to replace it. This is done in the operating system. This is normally very reliable in Windows. Photoshop uses the profile it gets from Windows. The only thing you need to watch, is that you must relaunch Photoshop. It loads the monitor profile at application startup.

 

The only scenario I've heard about where this can break, is in systems with an integrated dispay + an external connected display. This can apparently break how displays are assigned in the OS. So is that the case here? As I asked before: do you have more than one display?

 

EDIT: There are still a lot of unknown variables here that depend on how the "Dell version" of i1Profiler works. Is this genuine hardware calibration where the software communicates directly with the display, or is the calibration done in the video card? Any calibration loader would only apply in the latter case (if even needed, which I don't think) - but still be unrelated to the problem here. Again, it's the profile, not the calibration.

 

If this is traditional video card calibration, you must change the profile manually, and then relaunch Photoshop. I'm still not clear on exactly how the profile is changed when the calibration targets change. Do you open the Windows Color Management dialog and set it manually? Or does the software do it? If the latter, I'd look for bugs in the calibration software.

 

Someone or something has to change the profile. That's where the problem is.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Nov 04, 2022 Nov 04, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The monitor gets calibrated internally.

 

I don't have an integrated monitor. It's a desktop PC I put together myself with an external monitor (I do also run it to an HDTV but that alternate display is not on now and not currently shown as available in Windows or graphics card control panel. I don't have a monitor profile made for that HDTV yet anyway.).

 

Windows is for some reason insisting that the default profile is the wide gamut one that I profiled for my Dell after doing a wide gamut calibration in one of its four internal calibration slots.

 

I have Windows set to the proper REC709 profile the calibration software made after it internally calibrated the monitor.

 

Unless maybe a month ago, everything worked fine.

 

If I switch calibration modes in the monitor then I go toggle the correct monitor profile to default.

 

In case it got confused I even removed the other three options from current set of options in Windows.

 

I suppose I could try going to the spool/color drawer and actually taking out the wrong profile that it keeps using and see if that forces it to do something else. I certainly should not have to do that and have a feeling that at best that might just crash something at this point or make it default to sRGB with no profile.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Nov 04, 2022 Nov 04, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Removing the calibration loader and i1ProfilerPanel from startup and re-booting did nothing.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Nov 04, 2022 Nov 04, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I tried disabling CalibrationLoader and I1ProfilerTray from startup, didn't help.

 

Tried all sorts of things.

 

Finally I went to Windows/System32/Spool/Drivers/Color and (after backup up elsewhere first) the other three monitor profiles for my monitor (including the offending one that Windows 10 kept telling programs was default even though it was NOT the one set to default in Windows). And then it suddenly started working and now Photoshop shows Monitor RGB as the proper REC709 one for my monitor that is set to default. However, one really should not have to delete other monitor profiles to get it to send the proper selected one.

 

At least it is a temp workaround until whatever went wrong gets fixed. Not sure if a Windows 10 patch bothced it up or if something during the install of the new next year's versions of Adobe software somehow messed up the system a bit.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Nov 05, 2022 Nov 05, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

OK, glad you finally got it to work. I can't really explain what happened, it sounds more like a random glitch in the matrix than a genuine reproducible bug. We would have seen similar cases, and we haven't.

 

Anyway, excellent 🙂

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Nov 05, 2022 Nov 05, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

Glad its fixed, that does seem like a Windows issue.
 
IN cases like this [temporarily] setting the default monitor display profile to "CX_Monitor_weird.icc" [from the colour gurus at Chromix] can help because it's SO obvious when it's used. It can be super useful in multiple display situations. 

 

http://www.colorwiki.com/wiki/Stunt_Profiles#CX_Monitor_weird.icc

 

I hope this helps
neil barstow, colourmanagement net :: adobe forum volunteer:: co-author: 'getting colour right'
google me "neil barstow colourmanagement" for lots of free articles on colour management

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines